Bandits in Guinea steal suspected Ebola blood

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Vials Containing Ebola Infected Blood Stolen


CONAKRY, Guinea (AP) -- It was a highway robbery but the bandits got more than they bargained for when they stopped a taxi in Guinea and made off with blood samples that are believed to be infected with the deadly Ebola virus.

Authorities publicly appealed on national radio Friday to the unidentified robbers to hand over the samples that were stolen from the taxi during its 265-kilometer (165-mile) trek on winding rural roads from the central Kankan prefecture to a test site in southern Gueckedou.

The samples, stored in tightly wrapped vials tucked into a cooler bag, were in the care of a Red Cross courier who was among nine passengers sharing a taxi when three bandits on a motorbike led the attack near the town of Kissidougou, a local Red Cross official said.

The robbers forced the passengers out, stole mobile phones, cash and jewelry, and fired into the air as they demanded the handover of the cooler bag, said Saa Mamady Leno of the Red Cross in Gueckedou. The courier, Abubakar Donzo, was later questioned by police.

Faya Etienne Tolno, a spokesman for the Guinea Red Cross, said the aid group had a shortage of vehicles for transport, which explains why a taxi was used. No one was injured in the incident, which took place on a road known for banditry.

"We don't understand why they stole the blood sample. Perhaps they thought there was cash hidden in the flask," Tolno said.

Dr. Barry Moumie, who heads patient care for the national Ebola response coordination committee, told The Associated Press: "We have informed the security services. If these thieves handle this blood, it will be dangerous."

Ebola is spread primarily by contact with infected bodily fluids including blood, feces and vomit.

"I can assure you, however, that the sample-transportation procedures will now be strengthened to avoid such disappointments," Moumie said.

The theft underscores how hazards abound and hiccups remain in the aid response, despite millions of dollars' worth of international support pouring into West Africa to fight a virus now responsible for more than 5,000 deaths in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.

Dr. Hans Rosling, who is advising Liberia on its Ebola response, noted the difficulties of transporting such samples, saying countries and groups like the United States and the United Nations have rules about moving such hazardous materials.

In Liberia, "we use specifically allocated motorbikes and cars. We use what's available and what's reasonable. We have to organize things as we go along," he said. "It may have been the correct decision in Guinea (to use a taxi) and the robbery was just a sad mishap."

"There's no way we can secure transport in all of this area," Rosling said. "It was a good initiative to try to get the sample out."

International assistance has been increasing in Sierra Leone, where the World Health Organization has warned about an "intense" surge in cases.

The United Nations Children's Fund was working Friday to ramp up the number of community care centers in order to isolate more suspected patients. A total of 10 community care centers with eight beds each have been opened in the northern district of Bombali, one of the areas hit hardest in Sierra Leone. The outbreak in Sierra Leone alone is believed to have killed more than 1,200 people.

Five more centers will open in the next week, UNICEF spokesman John James said Friday.

The community care centers, built after consulting local officials and traditional leaders in rural areas, are part of an effort to break transmission by isolating more suspected patients, James said.

Such centers are critically important in halting the spread of the disease. A WHO report released Wednesday indicates that Sierra Leone has the lowest percentage of Ebola patients who have been isolated - only 13 percent.

"It's a way to isolate people, give them basic care in the area where they live. And it's easier for families to see them," James said. Those patients who test positive for Ebola will ideally be transferred to treatment or holding centers, he added.

A Dutch naval vessel arrived in Freetown, Sierra Leone's capital, on Thursday stocked with medical supplies and two laboratories that will be staffed by Dutch experts and managed by Save the Children and the U.K.'s foreign assistance arm. The supplies were provided by nine European Union countries, according to Hans Docter, the Dutch special envoy for Ebola.

The Dutch government will soon announce an additional 10 million euros ($12.4 million) for NGOs working on the Ebola fight, Docter said.

WHO announced Friday that Congo's separate Ebola outbreak was officially over after 42 days passed with no new cases. The outbreak, unrelated to the one in West Africa, was concentrated in northwest Equateur province and killed at least 49 people, according to local officials. Congo declared the outbreak over earlier this month.

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Bandits in Guinea steal suspected Ebola blood
Children out of school climb a wall to see a civilian helicopter land in Gueckedou, Ginea, Friday Nov. 21, 2014. Officials in Guinea say bandits during a roadside robbery stole a cooler containing blood samples that are believed to have Ebola, from a vehicle traveling from Kankan prefecture in central Guinea to a test site in Gueckedou, in the south. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this picture taken Thursday Nov. 20, 2014, an MSF Ebola heath worker is sprayed as he leaves the contaminated zone at the Ebola treatment centre in Gueckedou, Guinea. Officials in Guinea say bandits during a roadside robbery stole a cooler containing blood samples that are believed to have Ebola, from a vehicle traveling from Kankan prefecture in central Guinea to a test site in Gueckedou, in the south.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this photo taken Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014, a woman runs through a village near Faranah, in Guinea. A coalition of companies and aid groups announced plans Tuesday to test experimental drugs and collect blood plasma from Ebola survivors to treat new victims of the disease in West Africa. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
In this photo taken Monday, Nov. 17, 2014, a Mali soldier, center, controls a crowd of people during a visit by their president, Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, at the border village of Kouremale, Mali, between Mali and Guinea. On Mali's dusty border with Ebola-stricken Guinea, travelers have a new stop: Inside a white tent, masked medical workers zap incomers with infrared thermometer guns and instruct them to wash their hands in chlorinated water. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
In this photo taken Monday, Nov. 17, 2014, health care workers at a screening center for the Ebola virus await patients at the border village of Kouremale, Mali, between Mali and Guinea. On Mali's dusty border with Ebola-stricken Guinea, travelers have a new stop: Inside a white tent, masked medical workers zap incomers with infrared thermometer guns and instruct them to wash their hands in chlorinated water. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
In this photo taken Monday, Nov. 17, 2014, Mali's President, Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, washes his hands during a visit to the border village of Kouremale, Mali, between Mali and Guinea. On Mali's dusty border with Ebola-stricken Guinea, travelers have a new stop: Inside a white tent, masked medical workers zap incomers with infrared thermometer guns and instruct them to wash their hands in chlorinated water. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
In this photo taken Monday, Nov. 17, 2014, a woman walks past an Ebola health care center, rear, to be used for screening for Ebola virus patients at the border village of Kouremale, Mali, between Mali and Guinea. On Mali's dusty border with Ebola-stricken Guinea, travelers have a new stop: Inside a white tent, masked medical workers zap incomers with infrared thermometer guns and instruct them to wash their hands in chlorinated water. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
In this photo taken Monday, Nov. 17, 2014, Mali's President, Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, visits the border village at Kouremale, Mali, between Mali and Guinea. On Mali's dusty border with Ebola-stricken Guinea, travelers have a new stop: Inside a white tent, masked medical workers zap incomers with infrared thermometer guns and instruct them to wash their hands in chlorinated water. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
Annick Girardin, French state secretary for development, center, listens to Guinean President Alpha Conde making remarks following their meetings at the Presidency on Conakry, Saturday Nov. 15, 2014. Girardin was on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Annick Girardin, French state secretary for development, center, bids farewell to Guinean President Alpha Conde following their meetings at the Presidency on Conakry, Saturday Nov. 15, 2014. Girardin was on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country. At right is French Ambassador to Guinea Bertrand Cochery. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Macenta women chant "down with Ebola" at a meeting with Annick Girardin, the French development secretary, before the inauguration of the Macenta Ebola treatment center in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Macenta residents stare at the French delegation led by Annick Girardin, the French development secretary, as they inaugurate the Macenta Ebola treatment center in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Residents watch a French delegation led by Annick Girardin, the French development secretary, as they inaugurate the Macenta Ebola treatment center in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this photo taken Friday, Nov. 14, 2014, a health worker sprays disinfectant near a mosque, after the body of a man suspected of dying from the Ebola virus was washed inside before being berried in Bamako, Mali. It all started with a sick nurse, whose positive test results for Ebola came only after death. In a busy clinic that treats Bamako’s elite as well as wounded U.N. peacekeepers, who was the patient who had transmitted the virus? Soon hospital officials were taking a second look at the case of a 70-year-old man brought to the capital late at night from Guinea suffering from kidney failure. On Friday, Malian health authorities went to disinfect the mosque where the 70-year-old’s body was prepared for burial - nearly three weeks ago. Already some are criticizing the government for being too slow to react when health authorities had announced his death as a suspected Ebola case earlier in the week. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
In this photo taken Friday, Nov. 14, 2014, a health worker sprays disinfectant near a mosque, after the body of a man suspected of dying from the Ebola virus was washed inside before being berried in Bamako, Mali. It all started with a sick nurse, whose positive test results for Ebola came only after death. In a busy clinic that treats Bamako’s elite as well as wounded U.N. peacekeepers, who was the patient who had transmitted the virus? Soon hospital officials were taking a second look at the case of a 70-year-old man brought to the capital late at night from Guinea suffering from kidney failure. On Friday, Malian health authorities went to disinfect the mosque where the 70-year-old’s body was prepared for burial - nearly three weeks ago. Already some are criticizing the government for being too slow to react when health authorities had announced his death as a suspected Ebola case earlier in the week. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
Annick Girardin, French development secretary, washes her hands as she arrives at the Macenta Ebola treatment center to inaugurate it in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Annick Girardin, center, French development secretary, arrives in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Macenta residents watch a French delegation led by Annick Girardin, French development secretary, as they inaugurate the Macenta Ebola treatment center in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Annick Girardin, center, French development secretary, arrives in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Annick Girardin, center, French development secretary, arrives in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Macenta residents watch a French delegation led by Annick Girardin, French development secretary, as they inaugurate the Macenta Ebola treatment center in Macenta, Guinea Conakry, Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. Girardin, who is on a three-day visit to the Ebola-stricken country, officially opened the Macenta Ebola treatment center, built by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the French Red Cross and financed by France at a cost of 11 million euro (14 million US$). (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this photo taken Friday, Nov. 14, 2014, health workers spray disinfectant around a mosque after the body of a man suspected of dying from the Ebola virus was washed inside before being berried in Bamako, Mali. It all started with a sick nurse, whose positive test results for Ebola came only after death. In a busy clinic that treats Bamako’s elite as well as wounded U.N. peacekeepers, who was the patient who had transmitted the virus? Soon hospital officials were taking a second look at the case of a 70-year-old man brought to the capital late at night from Guinea suffering from kidney failure. On Friday, Malian health authorities went to disinfect the mosque where the 70-year-old’s body was prepared for burial - nearly three weeks ago. Already some are criticizing the government for being too slow to react when health authorities had announced his death as a suspected Ebola case earlier in the week.(AP Photo/Baba Ahmed)
In this picture taken Monday Nov. 10, 2014, expat children break for lunch at the American International School Tim Casey runs in Conakry, Guinea. Students and teachers pass through a temperature screening point when they enter the campus and wash their hands several times a day. Two years ago, the school that has remained opened through coups and now Ebola scare, had about 75 students. Today enrollment is in the low 30s, and anti-Ebola practices like hand washing have led to a drop in other illnesses. "The big thing that has done for us is we don't have kids coming down with colds, so our attendance has improved percentage wise," Casey said.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this picture taken Monday Nov. 10, 2014, Beth Casey, center, and her husband Tim Casey, left, engage with pupils at the American International School he runs in Conakry, Guinea. Students and teachers pass through a temperature screening point when they enter the campus and wash their hands several times a day. Two years ago, the school that has remained opened through coups and now Ebola scare, had about 75 students. Today enrollment is in the low 30s, and anti-Ebola practices like hand washing have led to a drop in other illnesses. "The big thing that has done for us is we don't have kids coming down with colds, so our attendance has improved percentage wise," Casey said.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this picture taken Monday Nov. 10, 2014, expat children break for lunch at the American International School Tim Casey runs in Conakry, Guinea. Students and teachers pass through a temperature screening point when they enter the campus and wash their hands several times a day. Two years ago, the school that has remained opened through coups and now Ebola scare, had about 75 students. Today enrollment is in the low 30s, and anti-Ebola practices like hand washing have led to a drop in other illnesses. "The big thing that has done for us is we don't have kids coming down with colds, so our attendance has improved percentage wise," Casey said.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this picture taken Monday Nov. 10, 2014, A traditional band play by the pool at a five-star hotel where expats hang out in Conakry, Guinea.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Pictured from a hotel window, a woman walks in the street in Conakry, Guinea, Friday Nov. 7, 2014. According to an update this week from the World Health Organization, there have been 13,042 Ebola cases and 4,818 deaths since the first child died of the virus in December — but those figures include all probable, suspected and confirmed cases and are subject to change as more information becomes available. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Pictured from a hotel window, A garbage collector gives the thumbs up after collecting trash in Conakry, Guinea, Friday Nov. 7, 2014. According to an update this week from the World Health Organization, there have been 13,042 Ebola cases and 4,818 deaths since the first child died of the virus in December — but those figures include all probable, suspected and confirmed cases and are subject to change as more information becomes available. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this picture taken Monday Nov. 10, 2014, Tim Casey engages with pupils at the American International School he runs in Conakry, Guinea. Students and teachers pass through a temperature screening point when they enter the campus and wash their hands several times a day. Two years ago, the school that has remained opened through coups and now Ebola scare, had about 75 students. Today enrollment is in the low 30s, and anti-Ebola practices like hand washing have led to a drop in other illnesses. "The big thing that has done for us is we don't have kids coming down with colds, so our attendance has improved percentage wise," Casey said.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Pictured from a hotel window, passengers disembark from a taxi in Conakry, Guinea, Friday Nov. 7, 2014. According to an update this week from the World Health Organization, there have been 13,042 Ebola cases and 4,818 deaths since the first child died of the virus in December — but those figures include all probable, suspected and confirmed cases and are subject to change as more information becomes available. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Pictured from a hotel window, a child plays with a football in Conakry, Guinea, Friday Nov. 7, 2014. According to an update this week from the World Health Organization, there have been 13,042 Ebola cases and 4,818 deaths since the first child died of the virus in December — but those figures include all probable, suspected and confirmed cases and are subject to change as more information becomes available. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Photo taken on November 21, 2014 at the port of Conakry shows containers with donations, including vehicles and materials, from the Netherlands, Belgium, Hungary, Britain and the Czech Republic to assist Guinea with the fight against Ebola. The outbreak, which has killed over 5,400 in west Africa and has ravaged countries like Guniea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, has been the deadliest so far. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
Guinean Foreign Affairs Minister Francois Losseny Fall (C) walks past soldiers of the Dutch ship Karel Doorman at the port of Conakry on November 21, 2014, after the ship arrived with donations, including vehicles and materials, from the Netherlands, Belgium, Hungary, Britain and the Czech Republic to assist Guinea with the fight against Ebola. The outbreak, which has killed over 5,400 in west Africa and has ravaged countries like Guniea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, has been the deadliest so far. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
A worker wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) has his name written on his suit before leaving the red zone at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A man walks in front of his house on November 20, 2014 in Macenta in Guinea. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman sits in front of a shelter on November 20, 2014 in Macenta in Guinea. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Guinean Foreign Affairs Minister Francois Losseny Fall (C-R) and Belgian Ambassador to Guinea Johan Verkammen (C) look at a truck donated by Belgium at the port of Conakry on November 21, 2014, after a Dutch ship arrived with donations, including vehicles and materials, from the Netherlands, Belgium, Hungary, Britain and the Czech Republic to assist Guinea with the fight against Ebola. The outbreak, which has killed over 5,400 in west Africa and has ravaged countries like Guniea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, has been the deadliest so far. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on November 20, 2014 shows the Ebola treatment center run by the non-governmental international organization French red cross in Macenta in Guinea. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A nurse wearing a personal protective equipment (PPE) assists a patient at the Ebola treatment center run by the French Red Cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
People walk in a street of Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A worker wearing a Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) prepares before leaving the red zone at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) prepare before leaving the red zone at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A worker wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) has his name written on his suit before leaving the red zone at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) prepare before leaving the red zone at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A health worker wearing a personal protective equipment (PPE) works at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A health worker wearing a personal protective equipment (PPE) works at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A nurse wearing a personal protective equipment (PPE) assists a patient at the Ebola treatment center run by the French Red Cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A health worker wearing a personal protective equipment (PPE) works at the Ebola treatment center run by the French red cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A nurse wearing a personal protective equipment (PPE) assists a patient at the Ebola treatment center run by the French Red Cross society in Macenta in Guinea on November 20, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Villagers from Momo Kanedou in Guinea looks at health workers from Guinea's red cross carrying the body of a victim of the Ebola virus on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Health workers from Guinea's Red Cross prepare to carry the body of a victim of the Ebola virus in Momo Kanedou in Guinea on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Health workers from Guinea's Red Cross carry the body of a victim of the Ebola virus in Momo Kanedou in Guinea on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Health workers from Guinea's Red Cross wearing Personal Protective Equipments (PPE) clean their gloves with desinfectant after removing from a house the body of a victim of the Ebola virus in Momo Kanedou in Guinea on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
People pray near the body of a victim of the Ebola virus in Momo Kanédou in Guinea on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Health workers from Guinea's Red Cross prepare to carry the body of a victim of the Ebola virus in Momo Kanedou in Guinea on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Health workers from Guinea's red cross carry the body of a victim of Ebola in Momo Kanédou in Guinea on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
People pray near the body of a victim of the Ebola virus in Momo Kanédou in Guinea on November 19, 2014. Guinea and fellow west African states Liberia and Sierra Leone have been hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus, which has claimed nearly 5,200 lives this year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). AFP PHOTO KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
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