Every city with hipsters wants to be a Brooklyn

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Every city with hipsters wants to be a Brooklyn
FILE - In this July 1, 2013 file photo, restaurants line the street adjacent to the Brooklyn Brewery, in the Williamsburg section of the Brooklyn borough of New York. Many neighborhoods around the world are comparing themselves to Brooklyn, where gritty, industrial neighborhoods have been gentrified and now attract hipsters, small businesses, artisanal food and the arts. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
This April 22, 2014 file photo shows the Bushwick Food Cooperative, located at the Shops of the Loom, on the site of a former textile mill in the Brooklyn, N.Y., neighborhood of Bushwick. Many neighborhoods around the world are comparing themselves to Brooklyn, where gritty, industrial neighborhoods have been gentrified and now attract hipsters, small businesses, artisanal food and the arts. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)
FILE - This May 5, 2014 file photo shows The Mark Morris Dance Center in an emerging arts district in the Fort Greene section of the Brooklyn borough of New York. Many neighborhoods around the world are comparing themselves to Brooklyn, where gritty, industrial neighborhoods have been gentrified and now attract hipsters, small businesses, artisanal food and the arts. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
A cyclist pedals by a a street art mural and a storefront church, Tuesday, April 22, 2014, in Brooklyn's Bushwick neighborhood in New York. The neighborhood, once considered dangerous, is beginning to attract tourists and hipsters. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
** TO GO WITH MINIENCUENTROS ** People walk by the Macri Park Bar located in the Williamsburg section of the Brooklyn borough of New York, Thursday, July 1, 2010. Speed dating, a dating party where groups of people have micro-dates with a handful of people over the course of an evening, has been rebranded as younger, hipper and more specialized with events like "The Internet Killed Your Social Skills." (AP Photo/Swoan Parker)
This June 25, 2011 photo shows visitors sampling beer at the Brooklyn Brewery in the Brooklyn borough of New York. The brewery is located in a 150-year-old factory in Williamsburg, a working-class section of Brooklyn with a gritty industrial past that has become popular among hipsters and is starting to attract tourists. The brewery also offers weekend tours that attract visitors from around the world. (AP Photo/Beth Harpaz)
FILE- This Oct. 30, 2008 file photo shows Luigi Viscome, a mason at 80 Metropolitan, as he works on the roofline of a condominium and townhouse development in the Brooklyn borough of New York. In the background are the Williamsburg Bridge and the lower Manhattan skyline. The bridge can be seen from many sections of Williamsburg, a working-class Brooklyn neighborhood with a gritty industrial waterfront that has become popular with local hipsters and is now starting to attract tourists. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, file)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 25: A person walks through the newly opened Rough Trade NYC on November 25, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Housed in a 15,000 square-foot former film prop warehouse at 64 N 9th Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Rough Trade NYC features an exhibition space, a 250-capacity live performance room as well as space devoted to records and books. While record sales across the nation have fallen dramatically over the last decade, some urban areas have witnessed a resurgence of vinyl consumers. This is the first U.S. location for the iconic London-based record label Rough Trade which signed such bands as the Smiths and The Strokes. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 25: A man walks past the newly opened Rough Trade NYC store on November 25, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Housed in a 15,000 square-foot former film prop warehouse at 64 N 9th Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Rough Trade NYC features an exhibition space, a 250-capacity live performance room as well as space devoted to records and books. While record sales across the nation have fallen dramatically over the last decade, some urban areas have witnessed a resurgence of vinyl consumers. This is the first U.S. location for the iconic London-based record label Rough Trade which signed such bands as the Smiths and The Strokes. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 25: A person walks through the newly opened Rough Trade NYC store on November 25, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Housed in a 15,000 square-foot former film prop warehouse at 64 N 9th Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Rough Trade NYC features an exhibition space, a 250-capacity live performance room as well as space devoted to records and books. While record sales across the nation have fallen dramatically over the last decade, some urban areas have witnessed a resurgence of vinyl consumers. This is the first U.S. location for the iconic London-based record label Rough Trade which signed such bands as the Smiths and The Strokes. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 19: The Brooklyn Bridge is viewed from a park in in DUMBO, an acronym for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass, on August 19, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Brooklyn, once a quiet and affordable borough across from Manhattan, is now home to some of the most ambitious projects in New York City. The Atlantic Yards development project, the Brooklyn Bridge Park and the building of residential towers in downtown Brooklyn are just a few of the development projects quickly transforming the borough. In the first half of 2014 alone total investment property sales in Brooklyn rose 38 percent from the first half of 2013 to 884. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 19: People relax in Brooklyn Bridge Park on August 19, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Brooklyn, once a quiet and affordable borough across from Manhattan, is now home to some of the most ambitious projects in New York City. The Atlantic Yards development project, the Brooklyn Bridge Park and the building of residential towers in downtown Brooklyn are just a few of the development projects quickly transforming the borough. In the first half of 2014 alone total investment property sales in Brooklyn rose 38 percent from the first half of 2013 to 884. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 19: People relax in Brooklyn Bridge Park on August 19, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Brooklyn, once a quiet and affordable borough across from Manhattan, is now home to some of the most ambitious projects in New York City. The Atlantic Yards development project, the Brooklyn Bridge Park and the building of residential towers in downtown Brooklyn are just a few of the development projects quickly transforming the borough. In the first half of 2014 alone total investment property sales in Brooklyn rose 38 percent from the first half of 2013 to 884. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 19: People relax near a carousel in DUMBO, an acronym for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass, on August 19, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Brooklyn, once a quiet and affordable borough across from Manhattan, is now home to some of the most ambitious projects in New York City. The Atlantic Yards development project, the Brooklyn Bridge Park and the building of residential towers in downtown Brooklyn are just a few of the development projects quickly transforming the borough. In the first half of 2014 alone total investment property sales in Brooklyn rose 38 percent from the first half of 2013 to 884. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 19: The Manhattan skyline is seen in the background as people relax in the Brooklyn Bridge Park on August 19, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Brooklyn, once a quiet and affordable borough across from Manhattan, is now home to some of the most ambitious projects in New York City. The Atlantic Yards development project, the Brooklyn Bridge Park and the building of residential towers in downtown Brooklyn are just a few of the development projects quickly transforming the borough. In the first half of 2014 alone total investment property sales in Brooklyn rose 38 percent from the first half of 2013 to 884. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 19: The Brooklyn Bridge is seen from a park in in DUMBO, an acronym for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass, on August 19, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Brooklyn, once a quiet and affordable borough across from Manhattan, is now home to some of the most ambitious projects in New York City. The Atlantic Yards development project, the Brooklyn Bridge Park and the building of residential towers in downtown Brooklyn are just a few of the development projects quickly transforming the borough. In the first half of 2014 alone total investment property sales in Brooklyn rose 38 percent from the first half of 2013 to 884. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 19: People relax near the water in DUMBO, an acronym for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass, on August 19, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Brooklyn, once a quiet and affordable borough across from Manhattan, is now home to some of the most ambitious projects in New York City. The Atlantic Yards development project, the Brooklyn Bridge Park and the building of residential towers in downtown Brooklyn are just a few of the development projects quickly transforming the borough. In the first half of 2014 alone total investment property sales in Brooklyn rose 38 percent from the first half of 2013 to 884. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 19: People relax near the water in DUMBO, an acronym for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass, on August 19, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Brooklyn, once a quiet and affordable borough across from Manhattan, is now home to some of the most ambitious projects in New York City. The Atlantic Yards development project, the Brooklyn Bridge Park and the building of residential towers in downtown Brooklyn are just a few of the development projects quickly transforming the borough. In the first half of 2014 alone total investment property sales in Brooklyn rose 38 percent from the first half of 2013 to 884. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
With the Brooklyn Bridge in the background, commuters on the Staten Island Ferry watch the morning sunrise in the New York Harbor in lower Manhattan July 11, 2014 AFP PHOTO / Timothy A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 19: A new building being constructed seen in DUMBO, an acronym for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass, section of Brooklyn on August 19, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Brooklyn, once a quiet and affordable borough across from Manhattan, is now home to some of the most ambitious projects in New York City. The Atlantic Yards development project, the Brooklyn Bridge Park and the building of residential towers in downtown Brooklyn are just a few of the development projects quickly transforming the borough. In the first half of 2014 alone total investment property sales in Brooklyn rose 38 percent from the first half of 2013 to 884. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 27: woman walks down a street in the Fort Greene neighborhood where the director and artist Spike Lee once lived on February 27, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. During a recent African-American History Month lecture, Lee used strong language to vent his feelings about gentrification in his former neighborhood and other parts of Brooklyn. Numerous Brooklyn neighborhoods, which were once considered dangerous and underdeveloped, have gone through transformations in recent years resulting in more affluent newcomers displacing long time residents. The 'Do The Right Thing' director accused many newcomers of not respecting neighborhoods history or character. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 27: The home stands in the Fort Greene neighborhood where the director and artist Spike Lee once lived in the Fort Greene neighborhood on February 27, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. During a recent African-American History Month lecture, Lee used strong language to vent his feelings about gentrification in his former neighborhood and other parts of Brooklyn. Numerous Brooklyn neighborhoods, which were once considered dangerous and underdeveloped, have gone through transformations in recent years resulting in more affluent newcomers displacing long time residents. The 'Do The Right Thing' director accused many newcomers of not respecting neighborhoods history or character. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 27: Pedestrians walk down a crowded street on March 27, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. According to estimates released on Thursday by the United States Census Bureau, New York City's population has increased by more than 61,000, pushing it past 8.4 million for the first time since population records have been kept. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 27: Pedestrians walk down a crowded street on March 27, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. According to estimates released on Thursday by the United States Census Bureau, New York City's population has increased by more than 61,000, pushing it past 8.4 million for the first time since population records have been kept. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 27: People wait in line outside of a court house on March 27, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. According to estimates released on Thursday by the United States Census Bureau, New York City's population has increased by more than 61,000, pushing it past 8.4 million for the first time since population records have been kept. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 27: Two homes sit side-by-side in the Fort Greene neighborhood where the director and artist Spike Lee once lived on February 27, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. During a recent African-American History Month lecture, Lee used strong language to vent his feelings about gentrification in his former neighborhood and other parts of Brooklyn. Numerous Brooklyn neighborhoods, which were once considered dangerous and underdeveloped, have gone through transformations in recent years resulting in more affluent newcomers displacing long time residents. The 'Do The Right Thing' director accused many newcomers of not respecting neighborhoods history or character. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 27: A man walks down a street in the Fort Greene neighborhood where the director and artist Spike Lee once lived on February 27, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. During a recent African-American History Month lecture, Lee used strong language to vent his feelings about gentrification in his former neighborhood and other parts of Brooklyn. Numerous Brooklyn neighborhoods, which were once considered dangerous and underdeveloped, have gone through transformations in recent years resulting in more affluent newcomers displacing long time residents. The 'Do The Right Thing' director accused many newcomers of not respecting neighborhoods history or character. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 27: People walk past the offices of director and artist Spike Lee in the Fort Greene neighborhood February 27, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. During a recent African-American History Month lecture, Lee used strong language to vent his feelings about gentrification in his former neighborhood and other parts of Brooklyn. Numerous Brooklyn neighborhoods, which were once considered dangerous and underdeveloped, have gone through transformations in recent years resulting in more affluent newcomers displacing long time residents. The 'Do The Right Thing' director accused many newcomers of not respecting neighborhoods history or character. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 27: A man walks in a park in the Fort Greene neighborhood where the director and artist Spike Lee once lived on February 27, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. During a recent African-American History Month lecture, Lee used strong language to vent his feelings about gentrification in his former neighborhood and other parts of Brooklyn. Numerous Brooklyn neighborhoods, which were once considered dangerous and underdeveloped, have gone through transformations in recent years resulting in more affluent newcomers displacing long time residents. The 'Do The Right Thing' director accused many newcomers of not respecting neighborhoods history or character. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 27: People walk down a street in the Fort Greene neighborhood where the director and artist Spike Lee once lived on February 27, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. During a recent African-American History Month lecture, Lee used strong language to vent his feelings about gentrification in his former neighborhood and other parts of Brooklyn. Numerous Brooklyn neighborhoods, which were once considered dangerous and underdeveloped, have gone through transformations in recent years resulting in more affluent newcomers displacing long time residents. The 'Do The Right Thing' director accused many newcomers of not respecting neighborhoods history or character. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 04: People walk down a popular shopping street in the rapidly developing neighborhood of Dumbo on October 4, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. A group of five prominent properties owned by the Jehovah's Witnesses have recently been sold and are slated to become part of a complex that will be converted into a center for technology companies. The five buildings, which will become part of the larger Brooklyn Tech Triangle, were sold to Jared Kushner, the Kushner Cos. CEO, and RFR for a reported $375 million deal. What was until recently a sleepy former manufacturing hub with cobblestone streets and derelict old factories has become one of the trendiest locations in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 04: People eat at food carts in Dumbo on October 4, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. A group of five prominent properties in Dumbo owned by the Jehovah's Witnesses have recently been sold and are slated to become part of a complex that will be converted into a center for technology companies. The five buildings, which will become part of the larger Brooklyn Tech Triangle, were sold to Jared Kushner, the Kushner Cos. CEO, and RFR for a reported $375 million deal. What was until recently a sleepy former manufacturing hub with cobblestone streets and derelict old factories has become one of the trendiest locations in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 04: Buildings owned by the Jehovah's Witnesses that have recently been sold and are part of a complex that will be converted into a center for technology companies are seen in the rapidly developing neighborhood of Dumbo on October 4, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. The five buildings, which will become part of the larger Brooklyn Tech Triangle, were sold to Jared Kushner, the Kushner Cos. CEO, and RFR for a reported $375 million deal. What was until recently a sleepy former manufacturing hub with cobblestone streets and derelict old factories has become one of the trendiest locations in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 04: Pedestrians and cars make their way on a street in Dumbo on October 4, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. A group of five prominent properties in Dumbo owned by the Jehovah's Witnesses have recently been sold and are slated to become part of a complex that will be converted into a center for technology companies. The five buildings, which will become part of the larger Brooklyn Tech Triangle, were sold to Jared Kushner, the Kushner Cos. CEO, and RFR for a reported $375 million deal. What was until recently a sleepy former manufacturing hub with cobblestone streets and derelict old factories has become one of the trendiest locations in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 04: A man sweeps a street in Dumbo on October 4, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. A group of five prominent properties in Dumbo owned by the Jehovah's Witnesses have recently been sold and are slated to become part of a complex that will be converted into a center for technology companies. The five buildings, which will become part of the larger Brooklyn Tech Triangle, were sold to Jared Kushner, the Kushner Cos. CEO, and RFR for a reported $375 million deal. What was until recently a sleepy former manufacturing hub with cobblestone streets and derelict old factories has become one of the trendiest locations in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 04: A man sells jewelry along a street in Dumbo on October 4, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. A group of five prominent properties in Dumbo owned by the Jehovah's Witnesses have recently been sold and are slated to become part of a complex that will be converted into a center for technology companies. The five buildings, which will become part of the larger Brooklyn Tech Triangle, were sold to Jared Kushner, the Kushner Cos. CEO, and RFR for a reported $375 million deal. What was until recently a sleepy former manufacturing hub with cobblestone streets and derelict old factories has become one of the trendiest locations in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 04: A woman walks down a street in Dumbo on October 4, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. A group of five prominent properties in Dumbo owned by the Jehovah's Witnesses have recently been sold and are slated to become part of a complex that will be converted into a center for technology companies. The five buildings, which will become part of the larger Brooklyn Tech Triangle, were sold to Jared Kushner, the Kushner Cos. CEO, and RFR for a reported $375 million deal. What was until recently a sleepy former manufacturing hub with cobblestone streets and derelict old factories has become one of the trendiest locations in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
One World Trade Center and the lower New York City skyline, including the Brooklyn Bridge, are seen from the air over New York on May 13, 2013. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 01: A man walks by a building still undergoing renovation along Van Brunt Street near the the building housing the newly re-opened Fairway Market on the waterfront in Red Hook on March 1, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Fairway, which quickly became a popular shopping destination and an anchor in the struggling community of Red Hook, was closed following severe flooding during Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012. Like the rest of Red Hook, Fairway has struggled to quickly re-open in a neighborhood that lost dozens of businesses during the storm. The re-opening, which included a ceremony and ribbon cutting featuring Miss America and Mayor Michael Bloomberg, is being viewed as Red Hooks official comeback since the storm. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - JANUARY 17: A graffiti memorial adorns a wall in memory of a man in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood on January 17, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Visual memorials honoring residents who in many cases met violent ends decorate many Brooklyn neighborhoods. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo recently signed into law the New York Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act, one of the toughest gun laws in the country. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - JANUARY 17: A graffiti memorial adorns a wall in memory of a man in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood on January 17, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Visual memorials honoring residents who in many cases met violent ends decorate many Brooklyn neighborhoods. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo recently signed into law the New York Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act, one of the toughest gun laws in the country. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
This July 18, 2011, photo shows bicyclists and pedestrians on the Williamsburg Bridge, which connects the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn with the Lower East Side section of Manhattan in New York. Williamsburg is a working-class ethnically diverse neighborhood that has become popular with local hipsters and is now starting to attract tourists. (AP Photo/Beth Harpaz)
This Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014 photo shows a view of the Thaddeus Ropac gallery, in Pantin, east of Paris. Pantin, a once-gritty Paris suburb, is sometimes compared to Brooklyn, New York. Both areas have gentrified, with artists and galleries moving in to old warehouses and real estate prices shooting up. Many other neighborhoods and cities around the world also compare themselves to Brooklyn, which has become known for hipster culture and artisanal food. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
A man rides on a bicycle along the Ourcq canal, in Pantin, east of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Pantin, a once-gritty Paris suburb, is sometimes compared to Brooklyn, New York. Both areas have gentrified, with artists and galleries moving in to old warehouses and real estate prices shooting up. Many other neighborhoods and cities around the world also compare themselves to Brooklyn, which has become known for hipster culture and artisanal food. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
This Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014 photo shows a view of the Thaddeus Ropac gallery, in Pantin, east of Paris. Pantin, a once-gritty Paris suburb, is sometimes compared to Brooklyn, New York. Both areas have gentrified, with artists and galleries moving in to old warehouses and real estate prices shooting up. Many other neighborhoods and cities around the world also compare themselves to Brooklyn, which has become known for hipster culture and artisanal food.(AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Graffiti covers a wall, in Pantin, east of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Pantin, a once-gritty Paris suburb, is sometimes compared to Brooklyn, New York. Both areas have gentrified, with artists and galleries moving in to old warehouses and real estate prices shooting up. Many other neighborhoods and cities around the world also compare themselves to Brooklyn, which has become known for hipster culture and artisanal food. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus
A man walks past an old manufacturer of Pantin, east of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Pantin, a once-gritty Paris suburb, is sometimes compared to Brooklyn, New York. Both areas have gentrified, with artists and galleries moving in to old warehouses and real estate prices shooting up. Many other neighborhoods and cities around the world also compare themselves to Brooklyn, which has become known for hipster culture and artisanal food. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
In this Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014 image girls look graffiti in Pantin, east of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Pantin, a once-gritty Paris suburb, is sometimes compared to Brooklyn, New York. Both areas have gentrified, with artists and galleries moving in to old warehouses and real estate prices shooting up. Many other neighborhoods and cities around the world also compare themselves to Brooklyn, which has become known for hipster culture and artisanal food. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
A man walks in front of an old manufacturer, in Pantin, east of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Pantin, a once-gritty Paris suburb, is sometimes compared to Brooklyn, New York. Both areas have gentrified, with artists and galleries moving in to old warehouses and real estate prices shooting up. Many other neighborhoods and cities around the world also compare themselves to Brooklyn, which has become known for hipster culture and artisanal food. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
This Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014 photo shows a view of a shut down manufacturer along the Ourcq canal , in Pantin, east of Paris. Pantin, a once-gritty Paris suburb, is sometimes compared to Brooklyn, New York. Both areas have gentrified, with artists and galleries moving in to old warehouses and real estate prices shooting up. Many other neighborhoods and cities around the world also compare themselves to Brooklyn, which has become known for hipster culture and artisanal food. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
A man walks in a street of Pantin, east of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Pantin, a once-gritty Paris suburb, is sometimes compared to Brooklyn, New York. Both areas have gentrified, with artists and galleries moving in to old warehouses and real estate prices shooting up. Many other neighborhoods and cities around the world also compare themselves to Brooklyn, which has become known for hipster culture and artisanal food. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
In this Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014 image, a family walks along the canal de l'Ourcq in Pantin, east of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Pantin, a once-gritty Paris suburb, is sometimes compared to Brooklyn, New York. Both areas have gentrified, with artists and galleries moving in to old warehouses and real estate prices shooting up. Many other neighborhoods and cities around the world also compare themselves to Brooklyn, which has become known for hipster culture and artisanal food. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
In this Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014 photo, people stand along the canal de l'Ourcq in Pantin, east of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Pantin, a once-gritty Paris suburb, is sometimes compared to Brooklyn, New York. Both areas have gentrified, with artists and galleries moving in to old warehouses and real estate prices shooting up. Many other neighborhoods and cities around the world also compare themselves to Brooklyn, which has become known for hipster culture and artisanal food. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
In this Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014 photo, a girl rides a scooter along the canal de l'Ourcq in Pantin, east of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Pantin, a once-gritty Paris suburb, is sometimes compared to Brooklyn, New York. Both areas have gentrified, with artists and galleries moving in to old warehouses and real estate prices shooting up. Many other neighborhoods and cities around the world also compare themselves to Brooklyn, which has become known for hipster culture and artisanal food. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
This Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014 photo shows a view of a shut down factory along the Ourcq canal , in Pantin, east of Paris. Pantin, a once-gritty Paris suburb, is sometimes compared to Brooklyn, New York. Both areas have gentrified, with artists and galleries moving in to old warehouses and real estate prices shooting up. Many other neighborhoods and cities around the world also compare themselves to Brooklyn, which has become known for hipster culture and artisanal food. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
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NEW YORK (AP) -- For more than a century, cities around the world have compared themselves to Paris. Many claim to be the Paris of the East: Bucharest, Prague, Istanbul, Beirut and Shanghai to name a few. There's also the Paris of North America (Montreal), the Paris of South America (Buenos Aires) and the Paris of the Plains - Kansas City in the Jazz Age.

But now the wannabe city is Brooklyn. Every neighborhood with a critical mass of bearded hipsters, bike shops and vegan cafes calls itself "the new Brooklyn." Ballard is the Brooklyn of Seattle. Glasgow and Melbourne both claim Brooklyn cool. And Oakland, California, has been called the Brooklyn of San Francisco so many times that Julia Cosgrove, editor of AFAR travel magazine, says she "can't bear to read another story about it."

There's even a Brooklyn of Paris: the once-gritty suburb of Pantin. Its derelict, graffiti-covered warehouses have been taken over by galleries and artists, turning it into the hippest place in the City of Light. Just like in Brooklyn, real estate prices have shot up, and old industrial buildings now house luxury lofts.

"It may have a way to go before it's on a par with Brooklyn, but I expect it will continue to develop, considering how much investment and risk-taking is going on there - alongside the natural flux of artists toward the area," said artist Oliver Beer, who works both with a gallery in Pantin and with the Museum of Modern Art's contemporary arts outpost, PS1, in New York City.

Other signs of what's called the "Brooklynization of Paris" include gluten-free restaurants and juice bars popping up. "It used to be when young chefs studied under the great chefs, they wanted to open important restaurants or go to the countryside and get their Michelin star. Now they're rejecting that model, they're saying, `I'm going to do more back-to-the-roots, farm-to-table cooking in a small restaurant with a few tables,'" said Katherine Johnstone, a spokeswoman for Atout France USA, the French tourism agency in New York, describing a shift that some observers compare to Brooklyn's culinary scene.

Tourism folks in Asheville, North Carolina, say their city was once called the Paris of the South, but now they compare it to Brooklyn, thanks to artisanal food, indie entrepreneurs and a thriving music and arts scene. An emerging arts and entertainment district in Miami that will link to areas like Wynwood, known for street art, is said by promoters to be "like Brooklyn in its nascent days" - an interesting thought, since Brooklyn was settled by the Dutch in the 1600s. And San Diego's South Park-North Park neighborhood is called SoNo, but it would be a no-no to compare it to Soho. Instead it claims a mix of Brooklyn and Southern California vibes.

But cities that once compared themselves to Paris were evoking something much grander than culinary trends or gentrification. In the mid-19th century, the "narrow, labyrinthine streets" of medieval Paris were demolished, making way "for the massive boulevards and squares where restaurants, cafes, theaters and other centers of amusement satisfied bourgeois taste," according to Villanova University history professor Alexander Varias. Cultural capitals in many regions underwent similar redesigns, then called themselves the Paris of wherever to signal pride in their architecture, broad boulevards, parks, arts and even nightlife.

Meanwhile, Brooklyn's emergence as a global symbol of all things trendy marks quite a turnaround for a place once mocked as Manhattan's less sophisticated neighbor - even if the new Brooklyn has new problems, like young professionals and affluent families pushing out the poor and working-class folks who populated Brooklyn for decades.

"We've become the epicenter of cool as cool is now defined," said Marty Markowitz, 69, who was born and raised in Brooklyn in an era when it was better-known for ethnic enclaves, working-class culture and the Brooklyn Dodgers. Markowitz, who served as Brooklyn borough president for 12 years and now works for NYC & Company, the city's tourism agency, promoting all the boroughs, added: "There is no question that Brooklyn now serves as an example for other urban centers of how a community can transform itself into a hotbed of style."

On Oct. 10, The Atlantic published a list of places The New York Times has compared to Brooklyn with headlines like "Brooklyn in Beijing" and "Brooklyn on the Hudson." Undaunted, a Nov. 6 Times headline read: "A Touch of Brooklyn in Ridgewood, Queens."

And if Queens is the new Brooklyn, there's already a name for that, too: Quooklyn.

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