Stunning microscope images show the beauty in detail

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32 PHOTOS
Nikon Small World
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Stunning microscope images show the beauty in detail

1st Place
-Mr. Rogelio Moreno 
-Panama, Panama 
-Rotifer showing the mouth interior and heart shaped corona

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

2nd Place
-Mr. Alessandro Da Mommio
-Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università di Pisa
-Pisa, Italy

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

3rd Place
-Noah Fram-Schwartz 
-Greenwich, Connecticut, USA 
-Jumping Spider Eyes 

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

4th Place
-Ms. Karin Panser
-Institute of Molecular Pathology I.M.P. Vienna, Austria 
-Caterpillar proleg with circle of gripping hooks in red

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

5th Place
-Dr. Muthugapatti K. Kandasamy
-Biomedical Microscopy Core, University of Georgia 
Athens, Georgia, USA 
-Bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells stained for actin (pink), mitochondria (green) and DNA (yellow)

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

6th Place
-Dr. Douglas Brumley
-Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
-Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA 
-Active fluid flow around P. damicornis (coral polyp) 

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

7th Place
-Mr. Dennis Hinks 
-Cleveland, Ohio, USA 
-Circuitry in DVD reader 

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

8th Place
-Dr. Igor Robert Siwanowicz
-Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) 
-Ashburn, Virginia, USA 
-Appendages of a common brine shrimp 

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

9th Place
-Ms. Meritxell Vendrell
-Servei de Microscòpia, Universitat Autònoma 
Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain 
-Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) ovary fixed and stained to show lectins (red) and nuclei (blue)

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

10th Place
-Dr. Paul Joseph Rigby
-CMCA, The University of Western Australia 
-Crawley, Western Australia, Australia 
-Daisy petal with fungal infection and pollen grains, whole mount, unstained 

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

11th Place
-Mr. Stefano Barone 
-Cremona, Italy 
-House cricket's tongue

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

12th Place
-Mr. Douglas Moore
-University Relations and Communications, University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point 
-Stevens Point, Wisconsin, USA 
-Montana Dryhead agate, unpolished 

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

13th Place
-Charles Krebs Photography 
-Issaquah, Washington, USA 
-Conochilus unicornis (rotifer), actively feeding. This rotifer species forms a free floating spherical colony

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

14th Place
-Dr. Ali Erturk
-Munich, Germany 
-Mouse brain vasculature 

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

15th Place
-Mr. Charles Krebs
-Charles Krebs Photography 
-Issaquah, Washington, USA 
-Chrysochroa buqueti (jewel beetle) carapace, near eye

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

16th Place
-Dr. Nils Lindstrom
-Developmental Biology, The Roslin Institute 
-Edinburgh, Scotland, UK 
-Three transgenic kidneys cultured together, showing colliding branching collecting duct systems

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

17th Place
-Mr. Rogelio Moreno
-Panama, Panama 
-Pleurotaenium ovatum (microalgae)

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

18th Place
-Mr. Jens H. Petersen
-MycoKey 
-Ebeltoft, Denmark 
-Anagallis arvensis (scarlet pimpernel)

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

19th Place
-Dr. Sabrina Kaul
-University of Vienna 
-Vienna, Austria 
-Larval stage of the acorn worm Balanoglossus misakiensis, dorsal view, showing cell borders, muscles and apical eye spots

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

20th Place
-Dr. Dylan T. Burnette
-Vanderbilt University School of Medicine 
-Nashville, Tennessee, USA 
-A crawling bone cancer (osteosarcoma) cell showing actin filament bundles in the lamella 

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

Honorable Mention
-Mr. Honorio Cócera-La Parra
-University of Valencia 
-Valencia, Spain 
-Conichalcite pseudomorph after azurite 

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

Honorable Mention
-Dr. Marco Dal Maschio 
-Max Planck Institute Neurobiology 
-Munich, Germany 
-Sagittal brain slice showing cell nuclei (cyan) and Purkinije cells (red) expressing EGFP 

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

Honorable Mention
-Mr. Evan Darling
-Rochester Institute of Technology 
-Rochester, New York, USA 
-Rat embryo fluorescently labeled with Rhodamine

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

Honorable Mention
-Mr. Geir Drange
-Asker, Norway 
-Leptothorax acervorum (ant) carrying its larva


Courtesy: Nikon Small World

Honorable Mention
-Mr. Frank Fox 
-Konz, Germany 
-Living Micrasterias in contrast Interphako 

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

Honorable Mention
-Noah Fram-Schwartz 
-Greenwich, Connecticut, USA 
-Ant Eye

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

Honorable Mention
-Department of Integrative Zoology, University of Vienna 
-Vienna, Austria 
-Lynceus brachyurus (clam shrimp), whole mount larva

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

Honorable Mention
-Dr. William James Hatton
-University of New South Wales, School of Medicine 
-Sydney, New South Wales, Australia 
-Mouse cardiac ventricular myocytes (isolated heart muscle cells)

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

Honorable Mention
-Ms. Hsiao-Ling Lu
-University of Miami 
-Coral Gables, Florida, USA 
-Pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) stage 17 embryo showing actin filaments (red), tubulin (green), nucleus (blue), and germ cells (white)

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

Honorable Mention
-Mr. Fabrice Parais
-DREAL de Basse-Normandie 
-Caen, France 
-Air pearl in the middle of larva Stratiomyidae respiratory fringe (Diptera aquatic larva).

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

Honorable Mention
-Mrs. Magdalena Turzanska
-Institute of Experimental Biology, University of Wroclaw 
-Wroclaw, Poland 
-Nowellia curvifolia (leafy liverwort) gametophyte, berberine stained Epi-autofluorescence with Z-stack Reconstruction

Courtesy: Nikon Small World

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By Keith Morrison

Taking the phrase of "putting it under the microscope" quite literally, the Nikon Small World contest recently announced its winners for 2014. Now in its 40th year, the contest aims to seamlessly merge the worlds of science and photography into a genre known as photomicrography.

The submissions -- 2,000 in total from professionals and hobbyists alike -- allow the viewer to step into the lab and explore the otherwise unseen world around them in a new and colorful way. This year's collection features an array of subject matter stemming from an up-close encounter with a jumping spider all the way down to the intricate circuitry of a DVD player.

This year's top prize was awarded to Rogelio Moreno of Panama for his unique shot of an open-mouthed rotifer. The extremely rare site required diligence on the end of Moreno who had to sit for hours waiting patiently for the moment to depress the shutter.

"When you see that movement, you fall in love. I thought -- wow, that is amazing, I can't believe what I'm seeing," said Moreno in a press release. "I hope now it can inspire others as much as it has inspired me –- to learn about science, to look closely and notice something truly amazing."

A computer system programmer by day, the self-taught Moreno now enters a collection of 36 other individuals who have received the top prize.

Browse the full set of winners and Honorable Mentions in the slideshow above!

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