Final Tower of London poppy 'planted' on Armistice Day

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Final Tower of London poppy 'planted' on Armistice Day
The near completed ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red" is lit up before sunrise in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day today. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
A remembrance day ceremony takes place at the near completed ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day today. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
The near completed ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' is seen lit up before sunrise in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day today. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, center, stands with Cadet Harry Alexander Hayes, left, and a Yeoman Warder after a remembrance day ceremony at the ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day today. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
A Yeoman Warder walks past the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation of ceramic poppies by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in London on November 10, 2014. Designed as a tribute to Britain's World War I dead, a blood-red trench of ceramic poppies around the Tower of London has become a national phenomenon as Britons flock to remember the fallen in generations of war. When the final poppy is planted on November 11, Armistice Day, the installation will consist of over 800,000 ceramic poppies, each one symbolising a British and Commonwealth military fatalities in WW1. AFP PHOTO/ANDREW COWIE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read ANDREW COWIE/AFP/Getty Images)
A Yeoman Warder holds ceramic poppies from the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in London on November 10, 2014. Designed as a tribute to Britain's World War I dead, a blood-red trench of ceramic poppies around the Tower of London has become a national phenomenon as Britons flock to remember the fallen in generations of war. When the final poppy is planted on November 11, Armistice Day, the installation will consist of over 800,000 ceramic poppies, each one symbolising a British and Commonwealth military fatalities in WW1. AFP PHOTO/ANDREW COWIE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read ANDREW COWIE/AFP/Getty Images)
The near completed ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' is seen lit up before sunrise in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day today. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
People look at the near completed ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red" in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Monday, Nov. 10, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day on November 11. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
Yeoman Warders, nicknamed Beefeaters, stand in the near completed ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red" in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Monday, Nov. 10, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day on November 11. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
People look at the near completed ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red" in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Monday, Nov. 10, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day on November 11. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
People look at the near completed ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red" in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Monday, Nov. 10, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day on November 11. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
General the Lord Dannatt reads out a list of names of some of the fallen soldiers from WWI during a remembrance day ceremony by the near completed ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day today. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 11: General the Lord Dannatt (C) leads a ceremony in which the last ceramic poppy was placed in the moat of Tower of London during Armistice Day, on November 11, 2014 in London, England. The installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
French Defence Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian (L) and British Defence Secretary Michael Fallon (R) walk through the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation of ceramic poppies by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in London on November 10, 2014. Le Drian and Fallon visited the installation to plant a ceramic poppy each. Designed as a tribute to Britain's World War I dead, a blood-red trench of ceramic poppies around the Tower of London has become a national phenomenon as Britons flock to remember the fallen in generations of war. When the final poppy is planted on November 11, Armistice Day, the installation will consist of over 800,000 ceramic poppies, each one symbolising a British and Commonwealth military fatalities in WW1. AFP PHOTO/ANDREW COWIE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read ANDREW COWIE/AFP/Getty Images)
The near completed ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' is seen lit up before sunrise in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day today. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
French Defence Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian (L) and British Defence Secretary Michael Fallon (R) walk around the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation of ceramic poppies by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in London on November 10, 2014. Le Drian and Fallon visited the installation to plant a ceramic poppy each. Designed as a tribute to Britain's World War I dead, a blood-red trench of ceramic poppies around the Tower of London has become a national phenomenon as Britons flock to remember the fallen in generations of war. When the final poppy is planted on November 11, Armistice Day, the installation will consist of over 800,000 ceramic poppies, each one symbolising a British and Commonwealth military fatalities in WW1. AFP PHOTO/ANDREW COWIE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read ANDREW COWIE / AFP,ANDREW COWIE/AFP/Getty Images)
French Defence Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian (L) and British Defence Secretary Michael Fallon (R) walk through the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation of ceramic poppies by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in London on November 10, 2014. Le Drian and Fallon visited the installation to plant a ceramic poppy each. Designed as a tribute to Britain's World War I dead, a blood-red trench of ceramic poppies around the Tower of London has become a national phenomenon as Britons flock to remember the fallen in generations of war. When the final poppy is planted on November 11, Armistice Day, the installation will consist of over 800,000 ceramic poppies, each one symbolising a British and Commonwealth military fatalities in WW1. AFP PHOTO/ANDREW COWIE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read ANDREW COWIE/AFP/Getty Images)
Visitors take a group selfie backdropped by the near completed ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Monday, Nov. 10, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day on November 11. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
French Defence Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian (L) and British Defence Secretary Michael Fallon (R) walk around the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation of ceramic poppies by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in London on November 10, 2014. Le Drian and Fallon visited the installation to plant a ceramic poppy each. Designed as a tribute to Britain's World War I dead, a blood-red trench of ceramic poppies around the Tower of London has become a national phenomenon as Britons flock to remember the fallen in generations of war. When the final poppy is planted on November 11, Armistice Day, the installation will consist of over 800,000 ceramic poppies, each one symbolising a British and Commonwealth military fatalities in WW1. AFP PHOTO/ANDREW COWIE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read ANDREW COWIE / AFP,ANDREW COWIE/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of the public gather to watch as the final poppy is added to the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, commemorating service personnel killed in WW1, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London, on November 11, 2014. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
A ceremony to mark the addition of the final poppy to the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, is pictured on Armistice Day in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London, on November 11, 2014. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
Britain's General Sir Francis Richard Dannatt reads out the names of service personnel killed in WW1 on Armistice Day as the final poppy is added to the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London, on November 11, 2014. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 11: General the Lord Dannatt (C) leads the salute with Military cadet, Harry Alexander Hayes (3rdR) and artists Tom Piper (2ndL) and Paul Cummins (R) during a ceremony in which the last ceramic poppy was placed in the moat of Tower of London during Armistice Day, on November 11, 2014 in London, England. The installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
Members of the public gather to watch on Armistice Day as the final poppy is placed at the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking those killed in WW1, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London, on November 11, 2014. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
A Yeomen Warder is pictured on Armistice Day as the final poppy is added to the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking those killed in WW1, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London, on November 11, 2014. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
Ceramic poppies are pictured on Armistice Day as the final poppy is added to the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking those killed in WW1, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London, on November 11, 2014. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 11: General the Lord Dannatt (C) leads the salute with with Military cadet, Harry Alexander Hayes (6thR) and artist Tom Piper (5thL) during a ceremony in which the last ceramic poppy was placed in the moat of Tower of London during Armistice Day, on November 11, 2014 in London, England. The installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 11: Crowds of onlookers watch as a ceremony in which the last ceramic poppy was placed in the moat of Tower of London during Armistice Day takes place on November 11, 2014 in London, England. The installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 11: General the Lord Dannatt (C) reads the names of the fallen during a ceremony in which the last ceramic poppy was placed in the moat of Tower of London during Armistice Day, on November 11, 2014 in London, England. The installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 11: A Yeoman Warder stands amongst a sea of poppies during a ceremony in which the last ceramic poppy was placed in the moat of Tower of London during Armistice Day, on November 11, 2014 in London, England. The installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
Cadet Harry Alexander Hayes, (L) age 13, from the Reading Blue Coat School Combined Cadet Force, salutes after planting the final poppy at the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking those killed in WW1, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London, on November 11, 2014. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 11: General the Lord Dannatt (C) leads a ceremony in which the last ceramic poppy was placed in the moat of Tower of London during Armistice Day, on November 11, 2014 in London, England. The installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 11: Military cadet, Harry Alexander Hayes, looks at the last ceramic poppy he had earlier planted in the moat of Tower of London to mark Armistice Day, on November 11, 2014 in London, England. The installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
A picture shows ceramic poppies from the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in London on November 10, 2014. Designed as a tribute to Britain's World War I dead, a blood-red trench of ceramic poppies around the Tower of London has become a national phenomenon as Britons flock to remember the fallen in generations of war. When the final poppy is planted on November 11, Armistice Day, the installation will consist of over 800,000 ceramic poppies, each one symbolising a British and Commonwealth military fatalities in WW1. AFP PHOTO/ANDREW COWIE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read ANDREW COWIE/AFP/Getty Images)
Cadet Harry Alexander Hayes, (3rd R) age 13, from the Reading Blue Coat School Combined Cadet Force, salutes after planting the final poppy at the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking those killed in WW1, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London, on November 11, 2014. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
Cadet Harry Alexander Hayes, (2nd R) age 13, from the Reading Blue Coat School Combined Cadet Force, plants the final poppy at the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of WW1, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London, on November 11, 2014. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
Cadet Harry Alexander Hayes, (3rd R) age 13, from the Reading Blue Coat School Combined Cadet Force, plants the final poppy at the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking those killed in WW1, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London, on November 11, 2014. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 11: Sir Richard Dannatt, Military cadet, Harry Alexander Hayes and artists Tom Piper and Paul Cummins stand with yeoman warders, veterans and dignitaries after the last ceramic poppy was placed in the moat of Tower of London to mark Armistice Day, on November 11, 2014 in London, England. The installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 11: Military cadet, Harry Alexander Hayes, places the last ceramic poppy in the moat of Tower of London to mark Armistice Day, on November 11, 2014 in London, England. The installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
Cadet Harry Alexander Hayes, (3rd R) age 13, from the Reading Blue Coat School Combined Cadet Force, plants the final poppy at the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of WW1, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London, on November 11, 2014. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 11: Sir Richard Dannatt (C) salutes during the placing of the last ceramic poppy in the moat of Tower of London to mark Armistice Day, on November 11, 2014 in London, England. The installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 11: Military cadet, Harry Alexander Hayes, (C) and artist Paul Cummins (R) place the last ceramic poppy in the moat of Tower of London to mark Armistice Day, on November 11, 2014 in London, England. The installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 11: Crowds gather in front of City Hall as they await the placing of the last ceramic poppy in the moat of Tower of London to mark Armistice Day, on November 11, 2014 in London, England. The installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 11: Military cadet, Harry Alexander Hayes, places the last ceramic poppy in the moat of Tower of London to mark Armistice Day, on November 11, 2014 in London, England. The installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
A picture shows ceramic poppies lined up on a wall ready to be planted in the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in London on November 10, 2014. Designed as a tribute to Britain's World War I dead, a blood-red trench of ceramic poppies around the Tower of London has become a national phenomenon as Britons flock to remember the fallen in generations of war. When the final poppy is planted on November 11, Armistice Day, the installation will consist of over 800,000 ceramic poppies, each one symbolising a British and Commonwealth military fatalities in WW1. AFP PHOTO/ANDREW COWIE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read ANDREW COWIE/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture shows ceramic poppies from the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in London on November 10, 2014. Designed as a tribute to Britain's World War I dead, a blood-red trench of ceramic poppies around the Tower of London has become a national phenomenon as Britons flock to remember the fallen in generations of war. When the final poppy is planted on November 11, Armistice Day, the installation will consist of over 800,000 ceramic poppies, each one symbolising a British and Commonwealth military fatalities in WW1. AFP PHOTO/ANDREW COWIE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read ANDREW COWIE/AFP/Getty Images)
A Yeoman Warder walks past the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation of ceramic poppies by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in London on November 10, 2014. Designed as a tribute to Britain's World War I dead, a blood-red trench of ceramic poppies around the Tower of London has become a national phenomenon as Britons flock to remember the fallen in generations of war. When the final poppy is planted on November 11, Armistice Day, the installation will consist of over 800,000 ceramic poppies, each one symbolising a British and Commonwealth military fatalities in WW1. AFP PHOTO/ANDREW COWIE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read ANDREW COWIE/AFP/Getty Images)
A Yeoman Warder holds ceramic poppies from the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in London on November 10, 2014. Designed as a tribute to Britain's World War I dead, a blood-red trench of ceramic poppies around the Tower of London has become a national phenomenon as Britons flock to remember the fallen in generations of war. When the final poppy is planted on November 11, Armistice Day, the installation will consist of over 800,000 ceramic poppies, each one symbolising a British and Commonwealth military fatalities in WW1. AFP PHOTO/ANDREW COWIE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read ANDREW COWIE/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture shows ceramic poppies from the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in London on November 10, 2014. Designed as a tribute to Britain's World War I dead, a blood-red trench of ceramic poppies around the Tower of London has become a national phenomenon as Britons flock to remember the fallen in generations of war. When the final poppy is planted on November 11, Armistice Day, the installation will consist of over 800,000 ceramic poppies, each one symbolising a British and Commonwealth military fatalities in WW1. AFP PHOTO/ANDREW COWIE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read ANDREW COWIE/AFP/Getty Images)
People look at the almost complete ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Sunday Nov. 2, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day on November 11. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. Thousands of visitors have come to see the installation over the last few days. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
A person looks at the almost complete ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Sunday Nov. 2, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day on November 11. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. Thousands of visitors have come to see the installation over the last few days. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Yeoman Warders, nicknamed Beefeaters, stand in the near completed ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red" in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Monday, Nov. 10, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day on November 11. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
A view of the almost complete ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Sunday Nov. 2, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day on November 11. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. Thousands of visitors have come to see the installation over the last few days. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
People look at the almost complete ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Sunday Nov. 2, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day on November 11. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. Thousands of visitors have come to see the installation over the last few days. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Visitors view the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London on 2 November, 2014. The installation fills the Tower of London's famous dry moat with over 800,000 ceramic poppies to create a powerful visual commemoration for the First World War Centenary. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
The Tower of London (UNESCO World Heritage List, 1988), England, United Kingdom, 11th-13th century.
Visitors view the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London on 2 November, 2014. The installation fills the Tower of London's famous dry moat with over 800,000 ceramic poppies to create a powerful visual commemoration for the First World War Centenary. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
A Chelsea Pensioner visits 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London on October 31, 2014. When finished the evolving installation with fill the Tower of London's famous dry moat with over 800,000 ceramic poppies to create a powerful visual commemoration for the First World War Centenary. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
A volunteer works on the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London on October 31, 2014. When finished the evolving installation with fill the Tower of London's famous dry moat with over 800,000 ceramic poppies to create a powerful visual commemoration for the First World War Centenary. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 30: Visitors view the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation at Tower of London on October 30, 2014 in London, England. The installation by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper will eventually consist of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images)
Visitors view the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in central London on October 31, 2014. When finished the evolving installation with fill the Tower of London's famous dry moat with over 800,000 ceramic poppies to create a powerful visual commemoration for the First World War Centenary. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 16: Ceramic poppies covered in rainwater are seen ahead of a visit by Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh to the Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red evolving art installation at the Tower of London on October 16, 2014 in London, England. 888,246 poppies will be planted in the moat by volunteers with the last poppy being planted on the 11th November 2014. Each poppy represents a British or Colonial fatality in the First World War. The poppies are for sale with 10% plus all net proceeds going to six service charities. (Photo by Chris Jackson - WPA Pool /Getty Images)
Tower of London
LONDON, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 16: Ceramic poppies covered in rainwater are seen ahead of a visit by Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh to the Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red evolving art installation at the Tower of London on October 16, 2014 in London, England. 888,246 poppies will be planted in the moat by volunteers with the last poppy being planted on the 11th November 2014. Each poppy represents a British or Colonial fatality in the First World War. The poppies are for sale with 10% plus all net proceeds going to six service charities. (Photo by Chris Jackson - WPA Pool /Getty Images)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II (L) is pictured as she visits the Tower of London's 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' poppy installation in central London on October 16, 2014. The art installation will eventually consist of over 800,000 ceramic poppies, and serves to symbolise British and Colonial military fatalities in WW1. AFP PHOTO/ADRIAN DENNIS (Photo credit should read ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images)
The installation of over 800,000 ceramic poppies in the moat at the Tower of London dedicated to the British servicemen who died in WW1.
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BY AOL VIDEO

Commemorations are taking place around the world to mark the anniversary of the end of World War I and none are more beautiful than the remembrance in the UK.

The final poppy was planted at the Tower of London Tuesday by a young 13-year-old cadet. Thousands of onlookers gathered to get a look at the massive crimson field filled with more than 888,000 ceramic poppies.

The exhibition is powerful and emotional as well as gorgeous--every poppy stands for somebody who lost their life. This year is particularly special because it marks the 100th anniversary of the start of WWI.

The flower became a powerful commemorative symbol because many soldiers lost their lives surrounded by fields of poppies during the Great War.

The poppy also became a the symbol of a single gunshot, because a poppy--ironically-- looks like a gunshot wound.

The BBC reports this installation has been extended.

It was supposed to end this week but the Prime Minister says that this installation should remain standing until the end of the month.

Tower Of London Poppies Honor WWI Soldiers

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