Ice-T, military dogs to appear on NYC parade float

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Ice-T, military dogs to appear on NYC parade float
This 2012 publicity photo provided by Animal Planet shows a soldier and military working dog, in Afghanistan. Animal Planet embedded four camera crews with front line troops for six weeks to create a television special called "Glory Hounds," where each crew was assigned to a handler and his dog and the show set out to prove that dogs were more than military "tools." “Glory Hounds" airs Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013 at 8 p.m. ET/PT and repeats on Feb. 24 at 9 a.m. ET/PT. (AP Photo/Animal Planet)
This 2012 publicity photo provided by Animal Planet shows Lance Corporal Durward Shaw and his military working dog, Falko, in Afghanistan. Animal Planet embedded four camera crews with front line troops for six weeks to create a television special called "Glory Hounds," where each crew was assigned to a handler and his dog and the show set out to prove that dogs were more than military "tools." (AP Photo/Animal Planet)
CAPTION CORRECTION OF NAME. This 2012 publicity photo provided by Animal Planet shows Lance Corporal Durward Shaw and a military working dog, in Afghanistan. Animal Planet embedded four camera crews with front line troops for six weeks to create a television special called "Glory Hounds," where each crew was assigned to a handler and his dog and the show set out to prove that dogs were more than military "tools." (AP Photo/Animal Planet)
Los Angeles Sheriff Counter Terrorism Unit Sgt. Dryson and his dog Aron, left, meets with fellow members of the Counter Terrorism Unit as they patrol the subway at Union Station in Los Angeles on Tuesday, April 16, 2013. The city increased security following bomb explosions in Boston that killed two people and injured more than 80 near the crowded finish line of the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Los Angeles Sheriff Counter Terrorism Unit Sgt. Dryson and his dog Aron patrol at Union Station on Tuesday, April 16, 2013. The city increased security following bomb explosions in Boston that killed two people and injured more than 80 near the crowded finish line of the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
A member of the U.S. Navy Seals rappels from the scoreboard with a military service dog before the first half of an NFL football game between the Dallas Cowboys and Arizona Cardinals Sunday, Nov. 2, 2014, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)
This photo taken Feb. 18, 2014 shows Lexy, a therapy dog at Fort Bragg, N.C. A slowly evolving form of treatment, animal therapy is used in only a few other Army installations, including Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. A small number of dogs like Lexy are being used almost as co-therapists. Others routinely work as service animals and are often used for animal-assisted therapy, including in visits to patients in the hospitals. (AP Photo/Lolita Baldor)
A Colombian Army Special Forces soldier rappels with a dog, in a show of military exercises at the Tolemaida military base, during a visit by U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, in Melgar, Colombia, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014. Colombia was Hagel's first stop on his six-day, three-country trip to South America. Hagel will also travel to Chile and Peru, where he will attend a conference of defense ministers from the Americas. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)
This photo taken Feb. 18, 2014 shows a German Shepherd Lexy, with Van Woodruff, former Sgt. 1st Class who got a medical retirement, that is changing the lives of U.S. Army soldiers being treated for physical and psychological injuries. Maj. Christina Rumayor, a psychiatrist at the 82nd Airborne Division, says Lt. Col. Lexy — the therapy dog — is one of her most important tools. (AP Photo/Alex Sanz)
A sniffer dog equipped with a camera is restrained by a Dutch soldier during a training exercise inside the World Forum congress center, the venue of the Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague Netherlands, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. The aim of the March 24-25 NSS summit is to reduce the amount of nuclear material in the world and improve its security. Fifty-three countries and four international organizations are taking part in the negotiations. The images can be viewed remotely. (AP Photo/Freek van den Bergh, Pool)
A policeman plays with his dog near Union Buildings in Pretoria South Africa, Monday, Dec. 9, 2013. Former South African president Nelson Mandela's body is being prepared by the Military Health Service of the South African National Defense Force to lie in state at the Union Buildings according to the Presidency. Mandela died Thursday Dec. 5 at his Johannesburg home after a long illness. He was 95. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
Marine Cpl. Jordan Encalade is bitten in a burlap and nylon training jacket by patrol dog Leo, a German Shepherd, at the Marine Corps base at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Thursday, July 19, 2012. The Marine Corps has created its first police battalion. The specialized force made up of 550 military police officers and 29 dogs will be able to land within three days at any hot spot on the globe to gather evidence and intelligence to take down criminal networks and do other law enforcement work. Its creation is a key part of the Marine Corps' historic restructuring to become a leaner, more specialized force after fighting landlocked wars for more than a decade. The battalion comes as every branch in the military is trying to show its flexibility and resourcefulness amid defense cuts. (AP Photo/Grant Hindsley)
In this May 20, 2011 photo, Chyba, a 12-year-old former military dog who served in Iraq with the Army, poses at the Rancho Coastal Humane Society in Encinitas, Calif. Madeleine Pickens, wife of billionaire T. Boone Pickens, adopted her dog, Chyba, last year. War dog organizations say the number of inquiries from people asking about military working canines has risen dramatically. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
In this Sept. 8, 2011 photo, U.S. Marine dog handler Sgt. Mark Behl, left, of the 3rd Marine Expeditionary Force K9 unit, and another Marine, perform first aid on U.S. Military working dog Drak, after he was wounded in a bomb attack, in Sangin, Helmand province, Afghanistan. Drak's own handler, Sgt Kenneth A. Fischer, was also wounded in the bomb attack, which also killed several civilians. Both Fischer and Drak were flown out of the country for surgery and recovery. Eventually, in line with military custom, Fischer will adopt Drak and take him home. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
In this May 20, 2011 photo, Chyba, a 12-year-old former military dog who served in Iraq with the Army, poses in front of a military working dog monument crowned with her likeness in stone, at the Rancho Coastal Humane Society in Encinitas, Calif. Madeleine Pickens, wife of billionaire T. Boone Pickens, adopted her dog, Chyba, last year. War dog organizations say the number of inquiries from people asking about military working canines has risen dramatically. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
In this Sept. 8, 2011 photo, U.S. Marine dog handler Sgt. Mark Behl, of the 3rd Marine Expeditionary Force K9 unit, from Cottage Grove, Wis, sits on a cot cleaning his rifle as his military working dog Fuli rests on another cot, at Forward Operating Base Jackson, in Sangin, Helmand province, Afghansiatn. Handlers and their dogs, that sniff for explosives or narcotics or track down wanted persons, patrol together, day after day. Sometimes, they sleep side by side in military cots. They face the same dangers together. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
In this photo taken Thursday, July 29, 2010, Gina, a highly trained bomb-sniffing dog with the U.S. military, joins Staff Sgt. Chris Kench on a sofa at the kennel at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs. Gina was a playful 2-year-old German shepherd when she went to Iraq but months of door-to-door searches and noisy explosions left her cowering and fearful. After she came home to Peterson Air Force Base in June 2009, a military veterinarian diagnosed her with post-traumatic stress disorder. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
In this photo taken Thursday, July 29, 2010, Staff Sft. Melinda Miller hugs Gina after a workout on an obstacle course at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colo. Gina was a playful 2-year-old German shepherd when she went to Iraq as a highly trained bomb-sniffing dog with the U.S. military, but months of door-to-door searches and noisy explosions left her cowering and fearful. After she came home to Peterson Air Force Base in June 2009, a military veterinarian diagnosed her with post-traumatic stress disorder. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
In this photo taken Thursday, July 29, 2010, Staff Sft. Melinda Miller works Gina on an obstacle course at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colo. Gina was a playful 2-year-old German shepherd when she went to Iraq as a highly trained bomb-sniffing dog with the U.S. military, but months of door-to-door searches and noisy explosions left her cowering and fearful. After she came home to Peterson Air Force Base in June 2009, a military veterinarian diagnosed her with post-traumatic stress disorder. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
Euro the dog with civilian handler Mike Wilcox, right, attached to the 293rd Military Police Company out of Fort Stewart, Georgia, U.S.A., are seen during preparation for a clearing operation in farm land in Kandahar City, southern Afghanistan Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2010. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Department of Defense from Feb. 13, 2007, U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Harvey Holt and his military working dog Jackson search for weapons caches in Kahn Bani Sahd, Iraq. Holt, attached to the 732nd Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron, is patrolling with U.S. Army soldiers from the 1st Cavalry Division. On Monday, March 3, 2014, Holt, now living in Worthington, Ind., and a deputy with the Greene County Sheriff's Department, is finally adopting the dog, which is expected to arrive in Indiana. (AP Photo/U.S. Department of Defense via Bloomington Herald-Times, U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Stacy L. Pearsall)
FILE - In this Jan. 23, 2007, file photo, then-U.S. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Joseph Rocha, of Riverside, Calif., sits with Reno, an explosives detection and attack dog, on duty in Mina Salman, Bahrain, during the unloading of the USS Gladiator. The Navy is admitting it was wrong when it accused dog handler Michael Toussaint of vicious hazing that singled out Rocha, a gay sailor, under his command at kennels in Bahrain. Toussaint will still be forced to retire from the Navy for allowing what officials considered "minor" hazing directed at Rocha and all other trainees, according to two Naval officers. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)
** ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, AUG. 13**Marine Cpl. Megan Leavey poses July 17, 2007, with the military dog, Flapoor, at Camp Pendleton Marine Base in California where Flapoor, a Belgian Malinois, recovered there from injuries suffered in Iraq in 2006. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)
Sgt. Joshua Anderson takes military dog Piki through a training course on a mock airplane at Lackland AF Base, July 11, 2007. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Dog handler Staff Sgt. David Adcox works with military dog Kim during canine training at Lackland Air Force Base, Wednesday, July 11, 2007. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Sgt. Douglas Timberlake works with Jimmy, a military dog, during canine training at Lackland Air Force Base, July 11, 2007. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
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NEW YORK (AP) - Ice-T will appear on a float with military dogs and their wartime handlers at New York's Veterans Day Parade.

The rapper, actor and Army veteran will ride up Fifth Avenue with six dogs that served in Iraq or Afghanistan.

Ice-T says it's important to recognize the heroism of both human veterans and their canine counterparts. It's the first time dogs are being featured.

The float is funded by philanthropist Lois Pope. She works with several organizations that help reunite military dogs and the veterans with whom they served.

The parade steps off at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday from Madison Square Park.

The grand marshal this year is New York's former police commissioner, Raymond Kelly, who served in the Marines. He'll march with his wife, Coast Guard veteran Veronica Kelly.

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