Dallas nurse who caught Ebola: 'I'm not careless'

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...

12 PHOTOS
Amber Vinson
See Gallery
Dallas nurse who caught Ebola: 'I'm not careless'
Amber Vinson, 29, the Dallas nurse who was being treated for Ebola, right, embraces Emory University Hospital epidemiologist Dr. Bruce Ribner, as she leaves a press conference after being discharged from the hospital, Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014, in Atlanta. Vinson worked as a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas and cared for Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who died of Ebola at the hospital on Oct. 8. Vinson was one of two nurses who became infected while caring for Duncan. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Amber Vinson, 29, the Dallas nurse who was being treated for Ebola, second from right, is applauded by members of her nursing staff as she walks in with Emory Hospital spokesman Vince Dollard to a news conference after being discharged from the hospital, Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014, in Atlanta. Vinson worked as a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas and cared for Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who died of Ebola at the hospital on Oct. 8. Vinson was one of two nurses who became infected while caring for Duncan. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Amber Vinson, left, 29, the Dallas nurse who was being treated for Ebola, looks at Emory University Hospital epidemiologist Dr. Bruce Ribner, during a press conference after being discharged from the hospital, Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014, in Atlanta. Vinson, is now virus-free, worked as a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas and cared for Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who died of Ebola at the hospital on Oct. 8. Vinson was one of two nurses who became infected while caring for Duncan. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Amber Vinson, 29, the Dallas nurse who was being treated for Ebola, embraces members of her nursing staff while leaving a news conference after being discharged from Emory University Hospital, Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014, in Atlanta. Vinson worked as a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas and cared for Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who died of Ebola at the hospital on Oct. 8. Vinson was one of two nurses who became infected while caring for Duncan. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
ATLANTA, GA - OCTOBER 28: Amber Vinson, a Texas nurse who contracted Ebola after treating an infected patient, speaks to the media during a press conference after being released from care at Emory University Hospital on August 1, 2014 in Atlanta, Georgia. Vinson, a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, contacted Ebola after treating Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan, who later died of the disease. (Photo by Daniel Shirey/Getty Images)
Amber Vinson, 29, the Dallas nurse who was being treated for Ebola, speaks at a news conference as members of her nursing staff look on after being discharged from Emory University Hospital, Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014, in Atlanta. Vinson worked as a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas and cared for Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who died of Ebola at the hospital on Oct. 8. Vinson was one of two nurses who became infected while caring for Duncan. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Amber Vinson, 29, the Dallas nurse who was being treated for Ebola, rear, looks on as Emory University Hospital epidemiologist Dr. Bruce Ribner speaks during a news conference after Vinson was discharged from the hospital, Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014, in Atlanta. Vinson worked as a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas and cared for Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who died of Ebola at the hospital on Oct. 8. Vinson was one of two nurses who became infected while caring for Duncan. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
This Oct. 21, 2014, file photo, provided by Amber Vinson, shows  Vinson at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. Vinson, a Dallas nurse who was being treated for Ebola, will attend a news conference, Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014, to discuss her discharge from the hospital after tests showed she's virus-free. (AP Photo/Amber Vinson, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2014 file photo, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas staff line the drive that exits the emergency room as they wait for an ambulance carrying Ebola patient Nina Pham to depart, in Dallas. Pham, a nurse at the hospital was diagnosed with the virus after caring for Thomas Eric Duncan who died of the same virus. Amber Vinson, another nurse diagnosed, was taken to a similar location in Atlanta. For all the strengths of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, the first U.S.-diagnosed Ebola patient walked through the seemingly weakest link in its medical armor: the emergency room. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File)
Police keep watch on a home Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014 in Tallmadge, Ohio where Amber Joy Vinson stayed over the weekend before flying home to Dallas. At least seven people in northeast Ohio are under voluntary quarantine and being monitored because they had contact with Vinson, a Texas nurse who was diagnosed with Ebola shortly after visiting the area last weekend, health officials said Thursday. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
FILE - In the Oct. 15, 2014 file photo the driver of an ambulance wears protective clothing while transporting Amber Vinson, the second healthcare worker who contracted Ebola to a Dallas airport for a chartered flight to Emory Hospital in Atlanta for treatment, in Dallas. For all the strengths of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, the first U.S.-diagnosed Ebola patient walked through the seemingly weakest link in its medical armor: the emergency room. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade, File)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

ATLANTA (AP) -- The nurse who flew on a commercial jet before being diagnosed with Ebola says she wasn't careless or reckless.

In an interview Thursday on NBC's "Today" show, Amber Vinson also said she didn't get enough training to feel comfortable treating Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas.

"The first time that I put on the protective equipment, I was heading in to take care of the patient," she said.

Vinson also said she checked with health officials before flying Oct. 10 from Dallas to Cleveland and returning three days later. She said reports that she felt sick while traveling were false.

She also said she became fearful after learning that her fellow nurse Nina Pham, who had also been treating Duncan, was suspected of having Ebola.

"I was floored," she said in the interview. "I was afraid for myself and my family because I did everything that I was instructed to do every time and I felt like if Nina can get it, any one of us could have gotten it."

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta has acknowledged that Vinson wasn't stopped from flying. CDC Director Tom Frieden later said that was a mistake on the agency's part.

Vinson and Pham have both recovered from Ebola. Duncan died on Oct. 8.

Vinson said Thursday that she feels good, but still gets tired sometimes.

Asked whether she would be willing to treat another Ebola patient, Vinson said "absolutely."

"Nursing is what I do," she said. "I could never see a patient there that needs help and not do everything I can to help them."

More in the news:
US sends long-held Guantanamo prisoner to Kuwait
Snooki and JWoww: We don't want our kids on reality TV
Goodell testifies for two-plus hours at Rice hearing

Read Full Story

People are Reading