Companies sign secret tax deals with Luxembourg: report

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

5 PHOTOS
Luxembourg Tax Deals
See Gallery
Companies sign secret tax deals with Luxembourg: report
Signage is displayed outside American International Group Inc. (AIG) offices in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. AIG is scheduled to announce earnings figures on Oct. 31. Photographer: Craig Warga/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Deutsche Bank headquarters in Frankfurt, Germany, photographed Monday, May 19, 2014. Deutsche Bank AG says raising 8 billion euros (US $11 billion) in new capital from investors will strengthen its finances as it faces tighter regulation and uncertain costs from litigation. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
Purchase, UNITED STATES: (FILES) The sign that greets visitors and employees to Pepsico headquarters taken 19 July 2005 in Purchase, NY. PepsiCo Inc., the US snack food maker and No. 2 soft drink company, said Thursday 12 October 2006 its third-quarter profit jumped 71 percent. AFP PHOTO/FILES/DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
Banque LBLux, Bank building, Kirchberg district, city of Luxembourg
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

(Reuters) - More than 300 companies, including PepsiCo Inc (PEP.N), AIG Inc (AIG.N) and Deutsche Bank AG (DBKGn.DE), secured secret deals from Luxembourg to slash their tax bills, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) reported, quoting leaked documents.

The companies appear to have channeled hundreds of billions of dollars through Luxembourg and saved billions of dollars in taxes, the group of investigative journalists said, based on a review of nearly 28,000 pages of confidential documents.

The leaked documents reviewed by ICIJ journalists include hundreds of private tax rulings – known as comfort letters – that Luxembourg provides to corporations seeking favorable tax treatment.

Luxembourg officials denied any "sweetheart deals" in its tax system.

"The Luxembourg system of taxation is competitive – there is nothing unfair or unethical about it," ICIJ quoted Nicolas Mackel, chief executive of Luxembourg for Finance, as saying in an interview.

Pepsi, AIG and Deutsche Bank were not immediately available for comment.

EU state aid regulators are investigating Amazon's (AMZN.O) tax deals with Luxembourg, saying the arrangements could have underestimated the U.S. online retailer's profits and given it an unfair advantage, Reuters reported in October. (Reporting By Neha Dimri in Bangalore; Editing by Rodney Joyce)

More in the news:
US sends long-held Guantanamo prisoner to Kuwait
Goodell testifies for two-plus hours at Rice hearing
AC/DC drummer accused of trying to procure murder

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners