Pope to go to Turin to view burial shroud icon

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Pope to go to Turin to view burial shroud icon
Pope Francis blesses faithful during the Angelus noon prayer from his studio window overlooking St. Peter's square at the Vatican, Sunday, Nov. 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Riccardo De Luca)
Pope Francis touches his ear as he arrives for his weekly general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
Pope Francis arrives for his weekly general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
An exact copy of the Shroud of Turin, the linen cloth that wrapped the body of Jesus Christ, is displayed at the chapel of the Cahtholic Armenian patriarch�s residence in an east Beirut neighbourhood on September 30, 2010. The Shroud arrived in Beirut by the will of Nerses Bedros, the Armenian Catholic patriarch who after a pilgrimage to Turin last May decided to display permanently the replica at the Saint Elias Cathedral. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH EID (Photo credit should read JOSEPH EID/AFP/Getty Images)
An exact copy of the Shroud of Turin, the linen cloth that wrapped the body of Jesus Christ, is displayed at the chapel of the Cahtholic Armenian patriarch�s residence in an east Beirut neighbourhood on September 30, 2010. The Shroud arrived in Beirut by the will of Nerses Bedros, the Armenian Catholic patriarch who after a pilgrimage to Turin last May decided to display permanently the replica at the Saint Elias Cathedral. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH EID (Photo credit should read JOSEPH EID/AFP/Getty Images)
Lebanese women touch the surface of an exact copy of the Shroud of Turin, the linen cloth that wrapped the body of Jesus Christ, displayed at the chapel of the Cahtholic Armenian patriarch�s residence in an east Beirut neighbourhood on September 30, 2010. The Shroud arrived in Beirut by the will of Nerses Bedros, the Armenian Catholic patriarch who after a pilgrimage to Turin last May decided to display permanently the replica at the Saint Elias Cathedral. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH EID (Photo credit should read JOSEPH EID/AFP/Getty Images)
A Lebanese woman touches the surface of an exact copy of the Shroud of Turin, the linen cloth that wrapped the body of Jesus Christ, displayed at the chapel of the Cahtholic Armenian patriarch�s residence in an east Beirut neighbourhood on September 30, 2010. The Shroud arrived in Beirut by the will of Nerses Bedros, the Armenian Catholic patriarch who after a pilgrimage to Turin last May decided to display permanently the replica at the Saint Elias Cathedral. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH EID (Photo credit should read JOSEPH EID/AFP/Getty Images)
Detail of Shroud of Turin in Chiesa della SS. Annunziata church (Photo by: Godong/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)
Shroud of Turin in Chiesa della SS. Annunziata (Photo by: Godong/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)
Detail of Shroud of Turin in Basilica di Maria Ausiliatrice (Photo by: Godong/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)
Detail of Shroud of Turin in Duomo (cathedral) (Photo by: Godong/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)
Shroud of Turin in Duomo (cathedral) (Photo by: Godong/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)
FILE - This Thursday, Sept. 30, 2010 file photo shows a replica of the Shroud of Turin, which some believe is Jesus Christ's burial cloth, at a church in Beirut, Lebanon. The cloth bears the figure of a crucified man, complete with blood seeping from his hands and feet, and believers say Christ's image was recorded on the linen's fibers at the time of his resurrection. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla, File)
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VATICAN CITY (AP) -- The Shroud of Turin, the burial cloth some believe covered Jesus, will go back on public display next year.

Pope Francis said Wednesday he will go to that northern Italian city on June 21 to view that 4.3-meter-long (14-foot) cloth, which is kept in a climate-controlled case in Turin's cathedral.

As during the last display in 2010, reservations are required for the April 19-June 24 viewing but there is no charge.

Papal predecessor Benedict XVI has described the cloth as an icon `'written with the blood" of a crucified man, but didn't dive into scientific questions. Skeptics say the linen bearing the figure of a crucified man is medieval forgery.

Turin Archbishop Cesare Nosiglia has called the shroud both "reality and deep mystery" to which science hasn't given "concrete answers."

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