Wis. student bemoans Obama school lunches, organizes boycott

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D.C. Everest High Wisconsin high school lunch boycott - Meghan Hellrood
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Wis. student bemoans Obama school lunches, organizes boycott

Meghan Hellrood, who attends D.C. Everest High, in Westin, has organized a school lunch boycott while claiming the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act works against its two primary goals. (Google Maps)

Meghan Hellrood, who attends D.C. Everest High, in Westin, has organized a school lunch boycott while claiming the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act works against its two primary goals. (Facebook)
Meghan Hellrood, who attends D.C. Everest High, in Westin, has organized a school lunch boycott while claiming the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act works against its two primary goals. (Facebook)
A turkey wrap served at Forest Hill High School cafeteria, in Florida. Michelle Obama and the rest of the country's health experts have taken aim at the obesity epidemic in children and say one key to turning the tide is changing school lunch. (Alamy)
First lady Michelle Obama and a student look over their plates as they eat lunch in the East Room of the White House following the annual fall harvest of the White House Kitchen Garden in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014. In celebration of Farm to School Month, the Obama invited students from Arizona, California, and Ohio to participate in the fall harvest. These schools were selected because they are participating in farm to school programs that incorporate fresh, local food into their school meals, and they teach students about healthy eating through school gardens and nutrition education. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
First lady Michelle Obama and Food Network chef Rachel Ray discuss the lunches students from the Eastside and Northside Elementary Schools receive during a "Let's Move!" program at the Clinton, Miss., schools Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2013. The pair visited with the children and conducted a cooking contest between the schools' chefs. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
Spaghetti and broccoli lunch served at Forest Hill High School cafeteria. Many students around the country complain they are not getting enough to eat. (Alamy)
Fairmeadow Elementary School third grade students Ellery Carlson, left, and Tatiana Aboytes, right, pick chocolate milk during a school lunch program in Palo Alto, Calif., Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010. More children would eat lunches and dinners at school under legislation passed Thursday by the House and sent to the president, part of first lady Michelle Obama's campaign to end childhood hunger and fight childhood obesity. The $4.5 billion bill approved by the House 264-157 would expand a program that provides full meals after school to all 50 states. It would also try to cut down on greasy foods and extra calories by giving the government power to decide what kinds of foods may be sold in vending machines and lunch lines. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
Turkey corn dog lunch served at Forest Hill High School cafeteria. (Alamy)
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By RYAN GORMAN

A Wisconsin high school senior claims First Lady Michelle Obama's school lunch reforms have caused her school to serve smaller portions of processed foods.

Meghan Hellrood, who attends D.C. Everest High, in Westin, has organized a school lunch boycott while claiming the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act works against its two primary goals.

"We have calorie regulations now on our lunches, so students cannot take as much food as they used to be able to," she told local radio station WSAU. "The whole point of it was to get healthier foods, but instead of healthier foods, we're getting smaller portions of more processed foods."

To help classmates have better, more filling lunches, Hellrood has organized a "Pack-A-Bag" day boycotting the lunches served by the school.

All students are being encouraged by Hellrood and friends to bring their own lunches on November 13.

School officials took down posters hung in the hallways, but she told WSAU she believes word of mouth and a Facebook site will help make the boycott a success.

Students are already forced to bring their own food to school because the lunches aren't enough, she claims.

They have to pack more food themselves to go along with the school food. So, they're getting two meals," Hellrood told the station. "One is from school but they're bringing the other one."

Cafeteria staff even regulate how many packets of mayonnaise and barbecue sauce students can take. Hellrood brings her own mayo to school and freely hands it out in defiance of the rules.

"I'm 4-11 and weigh 90 pounds and I want more food," she quipped. "I can't imagine the senior guys on the football team."

Hellrood, who is also editor-in-chief of her school newspaper, has the full support of her parents.

Even though they give them 800 calories, which would seem like a reasonable amount for a smaller child, it's not the kind of food that children want to eat," father Jim Hellrood told WSAU.

The Hellroods are hardly the first people to complain about the new school lunches being served since the Obama rules went into effect.

Facebook and Twitter are full of pictures of the smaller, less filling meals.

Private schools like the one attended by the president's children, though, are free to serve whatever they like – fattening or not.

How The Political Game Of School Lunches Is Hurting Our Kids

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