Wealthy Kurd building replica of the White House in northern Iraq

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Wealthy Kurd building replica of the White House in northern Iraq
Construction work takes place at the building known as Erbil's White House, center, in this aerial photo taken of the Iraqi Kurdish city of Erbil, Iraq, on Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014. After admiring the White House in Washington for its beauty and simplicity, Kurdish businessman, Shihab N. Shihab is building a $20 million replica in the Iraqi city of Erbil replete with layers of Italian 21-carat gold leaf covering banisters and ceilings and Greek marble columns that grace the entrance. Photographer: Donna Abu-Nasr/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A car drives past a building known as Erbil's White House during construction in the Iraqi Kurdish city of Erbil, Iraq, on Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014. After admiring the White House in Washington for its beauty and simplicity, Kurdish businessman, Shihab N. Shihab is building a $20 million replica in the Iraqi city of Erbil replete with layers of Italian 21-carat gold leaf covering banisters and ceilings and Greek marble columns that grace the entrance. Photographer: Donna Abu-Nasr/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Main entrance of White House at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington DC, USA (Alamy)
Aerial view of The White House (Alamy)
This picture of the White House appeared in The Stranger in America?, by Charles Wm. Jansen, London, 1817. The print also appears in the Magazine of America History for May 1887 with the title from original sketch taken on the spot. It is the only picture in existence as far as known of the White House in Washington in 1931, before it was burned by British in War of 1812. (AP Photo)
The south front of the White House in Washington in 1825. (AP Photo)
The earliest published view of the White House, seen in this image of an introduction page to a travel book, which was drawn during Thomas Jefferson's administration. It shows the temporary wooden porch and steps of 1600, prior to the construction of Latrobe's stone platform at the north door. (AP Photo/White House Historical Association, HO)
An interior view of the recently refinished floor of the Oval Office in the White House August 22, 2001 in Washington, DC. Workers refinished the floor as President George W. Bush continues his vacation at his ranch in Crawford, TX. (Photo: Tina Hager,The White House/Getty Images)
American statesman Bill Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States, reading in the White House, Washington DC. (Photo: Consolidated News Pictures/Getty Images)
American First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy (1960 - 1999) sits and talks with CBS News correspondent Charles Collingwood in the East Room of the White House, Washington DC, January 15, 1962. The interview aired as a CBS News Special program called 'A Tour of the White House with Mrs. John F. Kennedy'. (Photo: CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images)
US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882 - 1945) sits at his radio desk in the White House, Washington DC, 1940s. His leg braces, seldom seen in photographs, are visible in this image. (Photo: FPG/Getty Images)
Spanish cellist Pablo Casals (1876 - 1973) gives a recital for American president John F. Kennedy (1917 - 1963) and Jackie Kennedy at the White House, 24th November 1961. (Photo: Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
U.S. President George W. Bush (C) speaks as (L-R) America Samoa Gov. Togiola Tulafono, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, Alabama Gov. Bob Riley, Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings, National Governors Association Chairwoman and Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano, Secretary of Health and Human Services Mike Leavitt, Secretary of Interior Dirk Kempthorne, Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, Wyoming Gov. Dave Freudenthal, West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III, and Washington State Gov. Chris Gregoire listen during a meeting February 26, 2007 at the White House in Washington, DC. The members of the National Governors Association are in Washington for their annual winter meeting.  (Photo: Alex Wong, Getty Images) 
US President George W. Bush (R) walks with British Prime Minister Tony Blair (L) to a joint press conference in the Cross Hall of the White House 17 July, 2003, in Washington, DC. Bush and Blair will meet privately after their press conference to discuss the war in Iraq and their intelligence gathering. Blair maintained the accuracy of British intelligence on Iraq's purchase of nuclear material from Niger, saying "we know for sure" that it bought 270 tons of the material from the African country in the 1980s. (Photo: Stephen Jaffe, AFP/Getty Images)
John F. Kennedy With His Children John John And Caroline in the Oval Office. (Photo: Mondadori/Getty Images)
The President of the United States Lyndon Johnson talking to the editors of some of the United States' most important newspapers inside the White House studio. (Photo: Mondadori/Getty Images)
The Blue Room at the White House, Washington DC, USA, 1908. (Photo: Print Collector/Getty Images)
The White House kitchen, Washington DC, USA, 1908. Illustration from The Story of the White House, by Esther Singleton, Volume II. (Photo: The Print Collector/Getty Images)
The Oval Sitting-room at the White House, Washington DC, USA, 1908. (Photo: The Print Collector/Getty Images)
The State Dining-room at the White House, Washington DC, USA, 1908. (Photo: The Print Collector/Getty Images)
President Harrison's bedroom at the White House, Washington DC, USA, 1908. (Photo: The Print Collector/Getty Images)
The East Room at the White House, Washington DC, USA, 1908. (Photo: The Print Collector/Getty Images)
Mrs. McKinley's bedroom at the White House, Washington DC, USA, 1908. (Photo: The Print Collector/Getty Images)
Private dining-room at the White House, Washington DC, USA, 1908. (Photo: The Print Collector/Getty Images)
Long corridor, The White House, Washington, USA, 1908. (Photo: The Print Collector/Getty Images)
The piano corner of the East Room of The White House. (Photo: Library of Congress)
The State Dining Room of The White House. (Photo: Library of Congress)
The Red Room of The White House. (Photo: Library of Congress)
The Green Room of The White House. (Photo: Library of Congress)
The President's Study in The White House. (Photo: Library of Congress)
The East Room of The White House in 1910. (Photo: Library of Congress)
The Conservatory of The White House. (Photo: Library of Congress)
A remodeled corridor in The White House. (Photo: Library of Congress)

The White House from the top of the State Department. (Photo: Library of Congress)

Front of White House from Lafayette Park. (Photo: Library of Congress)

Entrance of White House from interior of lobby. (Photo: Library of Congress)

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By RYAN GORMAN

An Iraqi businessman has decided to build his dream home in the city of Erbil -- a replica of the White House.

The to-scale replica is being built in a gated community called "Dream City" in the Kurdish capital and has already been valued at $17 million despite not even being finished.

"It's outrageous, really fancy, and well-built," Tony Hozeph, the general manager of Dream City, told ABC News.

The building includes layers of 21-carat Italian gold leaf covering banisters and ceilings and Greek marble columns that grace the entrance, among other luxuries.

"It's not finished yet completely, there's no furniture and the interior construction still needs to be done," Hozeph added.

Dream City is one of many gated communities being built in Iraq. Land in the wealthy enclave starts at 250 per square foot and houses sell for about $1,000 per square foot, Hozeph told ABC.

Erbil is one of many cities threatened by ISIS, but recent U.S.-led airstrikes appear to have staved off further attacks by the terrorists. At least for now.

The original White House was designed by Irishman James Hoban, completed in 1801 and burned down by the British during the War of 1812. Second President John Adams was the first to live in the iconic building.

A rebuilt White House was completed in 1817 and first lived in by President James Monroe.

Further additions were made over the years bringing the Neoclassical six-story building's square footage to more than 55,000.

It is not clear how big the Iraqi White House is. There is also no word on any measures being taken to prevent possible fence jumpers.

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