Get ready for the solar eclipse!

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Get Ready for Next Week's Solar Eclipse

Grab your pinhole projectors and welder's goggles, a partial solar eclipse is happening soon! Spectators will have a chance to see the event in North America this Thursday -- as the new moon is set to partially block the sun. Creating an afternoon light show!

The new moon will pass between the earth and the sun. However, the moon won't be close enough to our planet to produce a full eclipse -- instead, it will look more like a bite out of the sun. The event is expected to begin just before 6:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time on Thursday, and peak by around 10:00 p.m. after.

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Partial Solar Eclipse
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Get ready for the solar eclipse!
** RETRANSMITTING TO ADD INFORMATION THAT A CAMERA FILTER WAS USED TO PROTECT PHOTOGRAPHERS VISION FROM HARMFUL EFFECTS OF ECLIPSE ** A partial solar eclipse is shown Friday, April 8, 2005, in Penonome near to Panama City, Panama. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco) **EFE OUT**
A partial solar eclipse is shown Friday, April 8, 2005, in Penonome near Panama City, Panama. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco) **EFE OUT** ** EDS NOTE: A CAMERA FILTER WAS USED TO PROTECT PHOTOGRAPHERS VISION FROM HARMFUL EFFECTS OF ECLIPSE **
A focused image onto a white background through a telescope shows the moon crossing in front of the sun as seen from the Sydney Observatory on May 10, 2013. Star-gazers were treated to an annular solar eclipse in remote areas of Australia with the Moon crossing in front of the Sun and blotting out much of its light. The annular eclipse, a phenomenal which occurs when the Moon is so close to the Earth that is cannot completely cover the Sun when it passes between it, was seen across a band across northern Australia, while places such as Sydney saw a partial eclipse. AFP PHOTO / Saeed KHAN (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)
A child (L) watches a partial solar eclipse with a woman at the Sydney Observatory on May 10, 2013. Star-gazers were treated to an annular solar eclipse in remote areas of Australia with the Moon crossing in front of the Sun and blotting out much of its light. The annular eclipse, a phenomenal which occurs when the Moon is so close to the Earth that is cannot completely cover the Sun when it passes between it, was seen across a band across northern Australia, while places such as Sydney saw a partial eclipse. AFP PHOTO / Saeed KHAN (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)
A girl adjusts a telescope to focus the reflected image of a partial solar eclipse (bottom C) in front of the iconic Sydney Harbour Bridge (back L) on May 10, 2013. Star-gazers were treated to an annular solar eclipse in remote areas of Australia with the Moon crossing in front of the Sun and blotting out much of its light. The annular eclipse, a phenomenal which occurs when the Moon is so close to the Earth that is cannot completely cover the Sun when it passes between it, was seen across a band across northern Australia, while places such as Sydney saw a partial eclipse. AFP PHOTO / Saeed KHAN (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)
KHARTOUM, SUDAN - NOVEMBER 3: A partial solar eclipse is seen over the Sudanese capital Khartoum on November 3, 2013. A rare solar eclipse sweeps parts of North America, Europe and Africa, allowing a view of the Sun totally or partially blocked out by the Moon. (Photo by Stringer/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
KHARTOUM, SUDAN - NOVEMBER 3: A Sudanese girl uses a special viewing glasses to observe a partial solar eclipse over the Sudanese capital Khartoum on November 3, 2013. A rare solar eclipse sweeps parts of North America, Europe and Africa, allowing a view of the Sun totally or partially blocked out by the Moon. (Photo by Stringer/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
KHARTOUM, SUDAN - NOVEMBER 3: A partial solar eclipse is seen over the Sudanese capital Khartoum on November 3, 2013. A rare solar eclipse sweeps parts of North America, Europe and Africa, allowing a view of the Sun totally or partially blocked out by the Moon. (Photo by Stringer/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
KHARTOUM, SUDAN - NOVEMBER 3: A partial solar eclipse is seen over the Sudanese capital Khartoum on November 3, 2013. A rare solar eclipse sweeps parts of North America, Europe and Africa, allowing a view of the Sun totally or partially blocked out by the Moon. (Photo by Stringer/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
A partial Solar eclipse is seen just after sunrise over the Queens borough of New York across the East River on November 3, 2013 in New York. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
A partial Solar eclipse is seen just after sunrise over the Queens borough of New York across the East River on November 3, 2013 in New York. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
A partial Solar eclipse is seen just after sunrise over the Queens borough of New York across the East River on November 3, 2013 in New York. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
A partial solar eclipse as seen during sunrise in the coastal town of Gumaca, Quezon province, southeast of Manila on May 21, 2012. Thousands turned their eyes to the sky on both sides of the Pacific to gaze excitedly as a partial eclipse occluded the sun at dawn in Asia and at dusk in the western US. An annular eclipse occurs when the moon passes in front of the sun, but is too far from the Earth to block it out completely, leaving a 'ring of fire' visible. AFP PHOTO/TED ALJIBE (Photo credit should read TED ALJIBE/AFP/GettyImages)
An annular solar eclipse is seen above Hong Kong on May 21, 2012. Thousands turned their eyes to the sky on both sides of the Pacific to gaze excitedly as a partial eclipse occluded the sun at dawn in Asia and at dusk in the western United States. AFP / AARON TAM (Photo credit should read aaron tam/AFP/GettyImages)
A partial solar eclipse is seen from Tokyo on May 21, 2012 . For the first time in 932 years, a swathe of the country was able to see the annular solar eclipse, when the moon passes in front of the sun, blocking out all but an outer circle of light. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/GettyImages)
A partial solar eclipse is seen from Tokyo on May 21, 2012 . For the first time in 932 years, a swathe of the country was able to see the annular solar eclipse, when the moon passes in front of the sun, blocking out all but an outer circle of light. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/GettyImages)
A partial solar eclipse appears above a lightning rod in the sky of Taipei on May 21, 2012. The path of the eclipse will span 'a 240 to 300 kilometre-wide (150-185 mile) track that traverses eastern Asia, the northern Pacific Ocean and the western United States', according to the US space agency. The eclipse begins at sunrise in southern China at 2206 GMT on May 20 and swiftly travels eastward to the southern coast of Japan, NASA said. AFP PHOTO / Sam YEH (Photo credit should read SAM YEH/AFP/GettyImages)
An unidentified employee of the Stefanik Observatory in Prague uses a projection shield to show the partial solar eclipse visible in the Czech capital during the morning on Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011. The partial Sun eclipse started over the Czech Republic at about 08:00 CET and it will last until 10:50. In the culminating phase, up to 80 percent of the solar disc was obscured by the silhouette of the Moon passing between it and the Earth. (AP Photo/CTK, Michal Kamaryt) Slovakia Out
A Jordanian man uses his hand to show a reflected image of the partial solar eclipse, in Amman, Jordan, on Tuesday Jan. 4, 2011. A partial solar eclipse began Tuesday in the skies over the Mideast and will extend across much of Europe. (AP Photo/Nader Daoud)
The moon begins to travel a path across the sun during a partial eclipse visible from Bangkok, Thailand, Friday, Jan. 15, 2010. The phenomenon was visible for up to 11 minutes from parts of Africa and Asia. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai students hold special filters to observe a partial eclipse as the moon begins to travel a path across the sun in Bangkok, Thailand, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2010. The phenomenon was visible for up to 11 minutes from parts of Africa and Asia. (AP photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai students look through handmade telescopes to observe a partial eclipse as the moon begins to travel a path across the sun in Bangkok, Thailand, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2010. The phenomenon was visible for up to 11 minutes from parts of Africa and Asia. (AP photo/Sakchai Lalit)
A partial solar eclipse is seen near the minaret of a mosque in Rawalpindi, Pakistan on Wednesday, July 22, 2009. The longest solar eclipse of the 21st century pitched a swath of Asia from India to China into near darkness Wednesday as millions gathered to watch the phenomenon. (AP Photo/Anjum Naveed)
A partial solar eclipse is seen behind the Golden Temple, Sikhs holiest shrine, in Amritsar, India, Wednesday, July 22, 2009. The longest solar eclipse of the 21st century pitched a swath of Asia from India to China into near darkness Wednesday as millions gathered to watch the phenomenon. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)
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You have to be extremely careful when watching this -- it's best to use a pinhole projector, which can be just a pinhole in a paper plate. Then just aim the sunlight onto another piece of paper. It is never safe to look directly into the sun - always have something over your eyes!

According to NASA, the next full eclipse won't be visible in the U.S. until August of 2017.


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