Chinese coastguard vessels patrol disputed waters

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

12 PHOTOS
East China Sea
See Gallery
Chinese coastguard vessels patrol disputed waters
FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2012 file photo, Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) escort ship "Kurama" leads other vessels during a fleet review in water off Sagami Bay, south of Tokyo. A defense paper released Friday, July 26, 2013 by Japan's hawkish new government calls for an increase in the country's military capabilities and a more assertive role in regional security due to increased threats from China and North Korea. The paper also proposed creating a marine force to defend disputed islands in the East China Sea. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye, File)
FILE - In this Sunday, Aug. 18, 2013 file photo, Japanese Coast Guard boat and vessel sail alongside Japanese activists' fishing boat, not in photo, warning the activists away from a group of disputed islands called Diaoyu by China and Senkaku by Japan. Japan says it will give names to five uninhabited islands as part of a group in the East China Sea on Friday, Aug. 1, 2014, a move likely to spark anger from other claimants China and Taiwan. (AP Photo/Emily Wang, File)
In this photo released by Japan's 11th Regional Coast Guard, a China Coast Guard vessel numbered 2166 sails in waters 66 kilometers (41 miles) from the East China Sea islands called Senkaku by Japan and Diaoyu by China Wednesday, July 24, 2013. Chinese coast guard ships were spotted for the first time near the disputed islands controlled by Japan following a reorganization of the service in a bid to boost its effectiveness. (AP Photo/Japan's 11th Regional Coast Guard) MANDATORY CREDIT
In this photo released by Japan's 11th Regional Coast Guard, a China Coast Guard vessel numbered 2506 sails in waters 66 kilometers (41 miles) from the East China Sea islands called Senkaku by Japan and Diaoyu by China Wednesday, July 24, 2013. Chinese coast guard ships were spotted for the first time near the disputed islands controlled by Japan following a reorganization of the service in a bid to boost its effectiveness. (AP Photo/Japan's 11th Regional Coast Guard) MANDATORY CREDIT
In this photo taken Nov. 16, 2012 and released by U.S. Navy, the USS George Washington aircraft carrier, second row from bottom right, and JS Hyuga, bottom, cruise with other ships from the U.S. Navy and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force in East China Sea after the conclusion of Keen Sword, a biennial naval exercise by the two countries to respond to a crisis in the Asia-Pacific region. As U.S. President Barack Obama tours Asia to push his year-old pivot to the Pacific policy, the big question on everybody's mind is how much of a role Washington, with its mighty military and immense diplomatic clout, can play in keeping the Pacific. Japan is Washington's most faithful security partner in the Pacific and it is the most pinched by China's rise. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy, Chief Mass Communication Specialist Jennifer A. Villalovos) EDITORIAL USE ONLY
Japan Coast Guard vessels sail along with Chinese surveillance ship Haijian No. 66, third left, near disputed islands called Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, seen in background, in the East China Sea, on Monday, Sept. 24, 2012. (AP Photo/Kyodo News)
TAIZHOU, CHINA - SEPTEMBER 16: (CHINA OUT) Chinese fishing boats set off after being moored for three-and-a-half months due to the annual fishing ban on the East China Sea on September 16, 2014 in Taizhou, China. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
TAIZHOU, CHINA - SEPTEMBER 16: (CHINA OUT) Chinese fishing boats set off after being moored for three-and-a-half months due to the annual fishing ban on the East China Sea on September 16, 2014 in Taizhou, China. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
TAIZHOU, CHINA - SEPTEMBER 16: (CHINA OUT) Chinese fishing boats set off after being moored for three-and-a-half months due to the annual fishing ban on the East China Sea on September 16, 2014 in Taizhou, China. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
Gen. Herbert Carlisle speaks to reporters at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii on Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014. Carlisle said there have been some unsafe midair encounters after China declared an air defense identification zone over disputed islands in the East China Sea, like a Chinese jet that came within 30 feet of a U.S. Navy P-8 Poseidon plane in August, but most interactions between different countries’ aircraft have been very safe to a large extent. (AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy)
In this undated photo released by Japan Ministry of Defense, Chinese SU-27 fighter plane is shown. China and Japan are blaming each other for a close encounter between military jets over the East China Sea. China's defense ministry says Japanese F-15 fighters followed a Chinese TU-154 plane on regular patrol Wednesday, June 11, 2014 and got as close as 30 meters (100 feet). Japanese Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera said Wednesday that two Chinese SU-27 fighters had posed a danger to Japanese aircraft by flying near them. (AP Photo/Japan Ministry of Defense)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

(Reuters) - China has sent coastguard vessels to disputed waters in the East China Sea after Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe angered Beijing by sending a ritual offering to a Tokyo shrine that honors the dead from Japan's wars.

The uninhabited islands - which Japan controls and calls the Senkaku but which China also claims as the Diaoyu - have inflamed passions in the world's second and third biggest economies.

Relations between them are further aggravated by the respects that Japanese politicians regularly pay at the Yasukuni Shrine, which is widely seen as a symbol of Japan's past militarism.

Three Chinese coastguard vessels - 2305, 2101 and 2112 - patrolled Chinese "territorial waters" near the Diaoyu islands on Saturday, China's State Oceanic Administration said in a terse statement on its website. It gave no further details.

Patrols by vessels and aircraft from both sides near the disputed islands have raised fears of a clash.

China expressed "serious concern" on Friday after Abe sent a small masakaki tree to the shrine. South Korea deplored the offering saying the shrine was "the symbol of glorification of Japan's colonization and invasive war".

On Saturday, three Japanese cabinet members visited the shrine which honors wartime leaders convicted by an Allied tribunal as war criminals along with millions of war dead.

Bitter memories persist of Japan's brutal 1931-45 occupation of parts of China and its 1910-45 colonization of the Korean peninsula.

Both countries feel Japan has never fully atoned for its actions.

Abe outraged Beijing and Seoul by visiting Yasukuni in person in 2013. He said he went not to glorify the war but to honor those who fought and died for their country.

But he has stayed away from the shrine since then, instead sending offerings on key dates, seeking to tread a fine line between his conservative convictions and the diplomatic imperative to improve ties with China.

Expectations have been growing in Japan that Abe will meet Chinese President Xi Jinping for ice-breaking talks on the sidelines of a Nov. 10-11 Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Beijing.

Abe has also signaled that he wants to meet South Korean President Park Geun-hye at the summit. But the ill will over the legacy of Japan's colonization have cast doubts over that.

(Reporting by Kathy Chen and Benjamin Kang Lim; Editing by Robert Birsel)

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners