Bono says 'oops' about that album he forced on you

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Bono Says 'Oops' About That Album He Forced On You

If you're one of the 800 million iTunes users who had their phones violated by U2's new album 'Songs of Innocence', Bono would just like to say "oops."

Last month Apples CEO Tim Cook announced that all iTunes users were getting a free copy of U2's new album -- whether they wanted it or not. It turns out no one really wanted it.

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Bono says 'oops' about that album he forced on you
U2 members Bono, left, and Larry Mullen Jr. perform during an announcement of new products by Apple on Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014, in Cupertino, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Apple CEO Tim Cook, left, smiles next to U2 members, The Edge, Bono, and Larry Mullen Jr. during an announcement of new products on Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014, in Cupertino, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Apple CEO Tim Cook, left, greets Bono from the band U2 after they preformed at the end of the Apple event on Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014, in Cupertino, Calif. Apple unveiled a new Apple Watch, the iPhone 6 and Apple Pay. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Bono from the band U2 speaks to delegates during the European People's Party Congress at the convention centre, Dublin, Ireland, Friday, March 7, 2014. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
The Edge, from left, Bono, Larry Mullen, Jr., and Adam Clayton of U2 arrive at the Oscars on Sunday, March 2, 2014, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
The Edge, left, and Bono of U2 perform on stage during the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre on Sunday, March 2, 2014, in Los Angeles. (Photo by John Shearer/Invision/AP)
Bono of U2 performs on stage during the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre on Sunday, March 2, 2014, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP)
Bono of U2 performs on stage during the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre on Sunday, March 2, 2014, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP)
Bono, right, and The Edge of U2 perform on stage during the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre on Sunday, March 2, 2014, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP)
The Edge, left, and Bono, of musical group U2, arrive at the 71st annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by John Shearer/Invision/AP)
Bono of U2 performs on stage during the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre on Sunday, March 2, 2014, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP)
From left, Larry Mullen Jr., Bono, Adam Clayton, and The Edge of U2 pose in the press room with the award for best original song for "Ordinary Love" from the film "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom" at the 71st annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
Bono of U2 poses in the press room with the award for best original song for "Ordinary Love" from the film "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom" at the 71st annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
Adam Clayton, left, and Bono of U2 pose in the press room with the award for best original song for "Ordinary Love" from the film "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom" at the 71st annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
From left, Larry Mullen Jr., Adam Clayton, Bono and The Edge of U2 pose in the press room with the award for best original song for "Ordinary Love" from the film "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom" at the 71st annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
Bono, left, and The Edge, of musical group U2, arrive at the Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala at the Palm Springs Convention Center on Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014, in Palm Springs, Calif. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
Bono, left, and The Edge, of musical group U2, arrive at the Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala at the Palm Springs Convention Center on Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014, in Palm Springs, Calif. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
Bono, of musical group U2, accepts the Sonny Bono Visionary Award at the Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala at the Palm Springs Convention Center on Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014, in Palm Springs, Calif. (Photo by Frank Micelotta/Invision/AP)
From left, The Edge, Bono, Larry Mullen Jr., and Adam Clayton of U2 perform on stage at the 3rd Annual Sean Penn & Friends HELP HAITI HOME Gala on Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014 at the Montage Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Colin Young-Wolff /Invision/AP)
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Pretty much everyone agreed the album was atrocious and was angry when they realized they couldn't delete it. The problem got so bad that Apple had to create a special support page to tell users how to remove the songs.

Now, Bono is personally apologizing. In a Facebook Q&A the band had to address the album release head-on when a viewer asked about the release, even calling it "rude." Bono's response: "Oops."

"I had this beautiful idea and we got carried away with ourselves. Artists are prone to that kind of thing," said the U2 frontman.

He continued, "Drop of megalomania, touch of generosity, dash of self-promotion, and deep fear that these songs that we poured our life into over the last few years mightn't be heard. There's a lot of noise out there. I guess we got a little noisy ourselves to get through it."

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