North Korea: Remains of US soldiers being moved

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North Korea: Remains of US soldiers being moved
A caisson carries the remains of Army Pfc. James Holmes of Warren, Ohio, missing from the Korean War, during burial services, Thursday, May 29, 2014, at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. Earlier this month, The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, had been identified as Holmes and returned to his family for burial with full military honors. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)
A member of the honor guard takes his position during burial services for Army Pfc. James Holmes of Warren, Ohio, missing from the Korean War, Thursday, May 29, 2014, at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. Earlier this month, The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, had been identified as Holmes and returned to his family for burial with full military honors. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)
U.S. Prisoners of War in North Korea are shown in this undated photo provided by Pat Dunton, president of the the Korean War-Cold War Family Association of the Missing. Next week, Dunton will accompany a U.S. delegation to North Korea to observe a joint U.S.-North Korean search for human remains. About 8,100 servicemen are still unaccounted for from the 1950-53 Korean War. (AP Photo)
This undated photo provided by the U.S. Department of Defense shows Army Pvt. George Conklin, a teenage New York soldier killed in the Korean War more than 60 years ago. Conklin's remains have been identified and were returned to his upstate hometown Wednesday night, Nov. 6, 2013. Conklin, promoted posthumously to corporal, will be buried with full military honors Saturday at a cemetery in Phelps, N.Y. (AP Photo/Department of Defense)
An Honor Guard member carries the remains of Army Sgt. 1st Class Joseph Steinberg during a funeral service with full military honors for Steinberg at Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno, Calif., Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013. Steinberg was taken Prisoner of War during the Korean War in February 1951 and passed away on April 30, 1951. His remains were identified 62 years after he went missing. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
Veterans join together for a prayer before a funeral service with full military honors for Army Sgt. 1st Class Joseph Steinberg at Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno, Calif., Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013. Steinberg was taken Prisoner of War during the Korean War in February 1951 and passed away on April 30, 1951. His remains were identified 62 years after he went missing. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
Sonia Kokx of Las Vegas, visits the vault containing the remains of her friend, U.S. Army Veteran Cpl. Robert Brown, at the Southern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery, Saturday, May 28, 2011, in Boulder City, Nev. Brown, who served in the Korean war, died last year. A study done for the National World War II Museum found that Memorial Day is losing its identity as a day to honor those who died in defense of the United States.(AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
Elementary school children sing and wave to a horse drawn caisson carrying the casket of Cpl Primo C. Carnabuci in Old Saybrook, Conn., Thursday, May 12, 2011. Carnabuci was killed in action during the Korean War. Through DNA testing Carnabuci's remains were found and brought home more than 60 years after his death. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
This photo provided by the Colorado National Guard shows Cpl. Floyd E. Hooper who died in the Korean war in 1951. The remains of Cpl. Floyd E. Hooper arrived at Denver International Airport , on Wednesday, Nov. 10, 2010. Hooper's was captured in February 1951 near Yangp'yong, Korea, and he died of dysentery and malnutrition a few months later. His remains were contained in some 208 boxes of an estimated 200 to 400 service men whose remains were turned over by North Korea between 1991 and 1994. Burial will be Saturday in Stratton, Colo. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
United Nations command soldiers carry one of the coffins containing remains believed to be those of 14 American servicemen missing in action from the Korean War from a U.S. Air Force C-17 cargo jet upon its arrival at the Yokota Air Base, outside of Tokyo, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2000. The remains were flown from the North Korean capital of Pyongyang for a United Nations Command repatriation ceremony. They were scheduled to be taken to the Army Central Identification Laboratory at Hickam Air Force Base in Hawaii later Saturday for forensic examination and positive identification.(AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
Sailors carry live ammunition, center, away from a smouldering plane on the hanger deck of the aircraft carrier Boxer while others man fire hoses to fight a fire which swept the area on August 9, 1952. The fire resulted from an explosion of undermined origin as the big carrier was about to launch an air strike against North Korea. The ship remained operative after the fire. (AP Photo)
Two of 366 caskets containing the remains of American soldier killed in fighting in Korea, are unloaded from the U.SS East Point Victory on May 14, 1951 in Oakland, California. It was the largest group of war dead to be returned from Korea to date. (AP Photo/PCS)
Residents from Pyongyang, North Korea, and refugees from other areas crawl perilously over shattered girders of the city's bridge on Dec. 4, 1950, as they flee south across the Taedong River to escape the advance of Chinese Communist troops. The Chinese entered the Korean War as allies of North Korea. U.S. troops battled on the side of South Korea. Begun in June 25, 1950, the war ended on July 27, 1953, with a military demarcation line set near the 38th parallel where it started. Korea remains divided. (AP Photo/Max Desfor)
FILE - In this Oct. 24, 1950 file photo, newly landed U.S. paratroopers greet First Cavalry Division tank crewmen at Sukchon, North Korea, during the Korean War. Just a week later, the division's 8th Cavalry Regiment was caught in a trap by two Chinese divisions at Unsan, suffering heavy casualties. The U.S. command had abandoned efforts to rescue the regiment. Some 260 Unsan soldiers remain listed as missing in action. Washington is evaluating whether to work again with North Korea to recover such remains, a program suspended in 2005 by the Bush administration. (AP Photo/Max Desfor, file)
FILE - In this Oct. 7, 1950 file photo, an 8th U.S. Cavalry Regiment patrol moves through hills near the line separating North and South Korea during the Korean War. One month later, two Chinese divisions caught the 8th Cavalry in a trap at Unsan, in far northern Korea, inflicting heavy casualties. The U.S. command had abandoned efforts to rescue the regiment. Some 260 Unsan soldiers remain listed as missing in action. Washington is evaluating whether to work again with North Korea to recover such remains, a program suspended in 2005 by the Bush administration. (AP Photo/Max Desfor)
FILE - In this July 10, 1950 back-and-white file photo, American GIs fire a 105 Howitzer gun in action against North Korean invaders somewhere in Korea. The US said Wednesday it is suspending efforts to recover remains of thousands of fallen service members in North Korea, the latest sign that a recent thaw in relations is over. The U.S. was in the process of resuming the hunt for remains missing from the 1950-53 Korean War that had been on hold since 2005, the only form of cooperation between the two militaries. (AP Photo, File)
FILE - In this May 2, 1944 file photo released by the U.S. Navy, rows of white mounds, with crosses at their heads show the bodies of Americans who died in the battle of Tarawa, in the Gilbert Islands. Some 560 U.S. servicemen are unaccounted for from the Tarawa battle. There are still 78,000 U.S. troops missing from World War II alone, including 35,000 the military believes it can recover. The rest are entombed on sunken ships or otherwise lost at sea. Thousands more are missing from the Korean and Vietnam wars. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy, File)
FILE - In this November 1943 file photo released by the U.S. Marine Corps., smoke is seen rising from the wreckage of Japanese defense installations as U.S. Marines crouch for cover during the invasion of Tarawa atoll, Gilbert Islands. Some 560 U.S. servicemen are unaccounted for from the Tarawa battle. There are still 78,000 U.S. troops missing from World War II alone, including 35,000 the military believes it can recover. The rest are entombed on sunken ships or otherwise lost at sea. Thousands more are missing from the Korean and Vietnam wars. (AP Photo/United States Marine Corps, File)
Unidentified Marines fold the flag which covered the casket of U.S. Marine Corps Pfc. Carl A. West, of Amanda Park, WA, Thursday, Oct. 4, 2007 at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. West was part of Weapons Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Regiment, of the 1st Marine Division and he died Dec. 8, 1950 in the Korean War. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
Can can dancers wave from dock as troopship carrying famed 2nd Infantry Division from Korea is nosed into dock in Seattle, Oct. 7, 1954 by a tug, right. The fighting Indian head division left here for Korea in mid-1950, fought in most of the bloody warfare. Its colors are being returned to nearby Ft. Lewis. (AP Photo)
Exploding ammunition and port-facilities form a spectacular blast cloud at Hungnam, North Korea on Dec. 30, 1950, after navy demolition crows, last to leave the beachhead, set off charges to keep the Reds from using the port. Lending barges circle in the foreground. (AP Photo)
Seaman Paul D. Carroll, of Hornbeak, Tenn., operates a lowering winch as the communications ship USS Eldorado anchors off a port in Korea on Dec. 27, 1950. (AP Photo)
A GI-fashioned sign board reading “we don’t want the damn place anyway” stands near the harbor at Hungnam, North Korea Dec. 25, 1950 to greet the reds as U.N. forces complete the evacuation of the beachhead. (AP Photo/FLS)
Formation of superforts of the U.S. Far East Air Forces bomber command, typical of these B-29s thatare blasting supply and communications centers in North Korea on Dec. 21, 1950 to prevent support of enemy ground forces. Superforts attacked four principal communist transportation centers on a main rail route in red held Korea on December 15. High explosive bombs hit military targets at Chongko-Don, Sonchon, Chongju and Sinanju. (AP Photo)
Sailors of the aircraft carrier USS Leyte use a powerful stream of salt water from a hose to clear the flight deck of snow on Dec. 16, 1950. As soon as the flight deck is rid of the snow, the Corsair fighter planes, already loaded with high velocity five inch rockets, continued their close and deep support missions in Korea. (AP Photo)
Chinese prisoners (left), rounded up by U.S. Marines (right), somewhere in the Frigid Mountains of North Korea, on Dec. 22, 1950 appear cold in spite of their padded uniforms. One (left) is blowing on his hands. Others huddle with hands in sleeves. A more fortunate prisoner (lower right center) has a blanket. (AP Photo)
U.S. Marines are halted on icy trail in Sub-zero temperatures of Northern Korea by Chinese roadblock during latters drive across the Yalu River on Dec. 14, 1950 in Korea. (AP Photo)
Sgt. Ulysses Coleman, Trenton, N.J., were among a group of wounded soldier patients brought from Korea to the Valley Forge General Hospital in Phoenixville on Dec. 13, 1950 for treatment. Hospital officials say the men were rescued by airlift from the Changjin Reservoir area of Korea. (AP Photo)
Weary Republic of Korea second division soldiers from a seemingly endless double line during their retreat from Chinese armies South of Pyongyang, in North Korea on Dec. 13, 1950. Almost all of North Korea was abandoned to the enemy as the bulk of the allied 8th army was withdrawn below the 38th parallel. (AP Photo)
A portion of the Marine encampment in the Chosin reservoir sector, North Korea on Dec. 11, 1950, prior to its move to the south. The Marines packed their equipment on truck, jeeps and tanks and smashed through the ring of Chinese communist troops surrounding them, meeting south of Kotori. (AP Photo)
U.S. President Harry Truman repeats his message to camera crew, who were excluded at the news session earlier, in the executive room at the White House in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 30, 1950. Truman warns that U.N. forces will not back down in Korea and the Atom bomb would be used if necessary to meet the military situation in the Korean War. (AP Photo/Henry Griffin)
Thailanders are shown firing N-1 rifles for familiarization, at camp walker, on reception center, Daegu, Korea on Nov. 12, 1950. (AP Photo)
Two mines, framed by waist guns of a U.S. Navy Mariner patrol plane, explode harmlessly in Korean waters on Nov. 12, 1950, after being hit by gun bursts from the Navy?s mine killing plane. The Mariner planes, operating from the seaplane tender U.S.S. Curtiss, have sought out and destroyed 38 of the dangerous mines to date. (AP Photo)
Seaman Carlos Smith, of Graceville, Fla., is hauled aboard a Navy helicopter as it hovers over Smith?s ship, the U.S. Destroyer Higbee, off the Korean coast on Nov. 5, 1950. Smith was troubled with a severe toothache which could not be treated aboard his ship and was transferred by copter to a nearby Cruiser, the Manchester, for dental treatment. He was then returned to his own ship. (AP Photo)
In this photo released by the Department of Defense, the U.S.S. Missouri is shown bombarding Chong-Ji, Korea, with 16-inch guns, Oct. 21, 1950. Chong-Ji is approximately 120 miles frm the Russian base of Vladivostok. (AP Photo/DOD)
A U.S. Marine Marksman using a telescopic sight and with his Springfield cocked and ready, waits for a troublesome North Korean sniper to pop up so he can pick him off in Seoul, capital city of South Korea on Sept. 28, 1950. (AP Photo/Max Desfor
Natives wave Korean flags and yell greetings to U.S. Marines as the latter roll through a village four miles from Seoul on way to battle for the liberation of the South Korean capital, Sept. 26, 1950. (AP Photo/Max Desfor)
U.S. Marines cover wounded North Korean soldier as he hoists himself to stretcher in the Naktong River sector of the Korean front on August 23, 1950. The captive was flushed out of a nearby rice paddy, still clutching his automatic weapons. A search of his clothing disclosed an American watch, lighter and other items apparently taken from a dead U.S. soldier. (AP Photo/Max Desfor)
An empty rice bowl beside her, this abandoned South Korean girl, mud-spattered and hungry, cries for attention on August 14, 1950. U.S. soldiers rescued the youngster and took care of her until they found a South Korean family to take care of the child. (AP Photo/U.S. Army)
Sgt. Nolie J. Cochran, 22, of Magnolia, Ark., crawls inside of tail pipe of a U.S. Air Force F-80 jet fighter to check for possible damage from intense exhaust heat on August 16, 1950. The plane is flying daily missions in support of ground forces on the Korean front. (AP Photo)
A 155mm howitzer crew lets go with its weapon somewhere in Korea on July 29, 1950. (AP Photo)
The U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, returned from a 10-day visit tour of the Pacific bases, hold a news conference with Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson, seated left, in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 13, 1950 during the Korean War. They announced that Gen. Douglas MacArthur has been given authority to assume control of American Naval forces in Japanese waters in event of emergency. Seated at right is Gen. Omar N. Bradley, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; standing from left are, Air Gen. Hoyt Vanderberg; Army Chief of Staff Gen. Joseph L. Collins, and Admiral Forrest Sherman, Navy Chief. (AP Photo)
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SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - North Korea said Monday that the remains of American soldiers killed during the Korean War were being neglected and "carried away en masse," in an apparent effort to pressure Washington to resume recovery efforts that could also lead to much-needed money for the impoverished country.

The United States suspended efforts to recover the remains of thousands of U.S. soldiers who died during the Korean War because of the North's plans to launch a long-range rocket in 2012. The U.S. at the time was just starting the process of resuming excavation work that had been suspended in 2005 when Washington said security arrangements for its personnel working in the North were insufficient. North Korea would have received millions of dollars in compensation for its support of the work.

About 8,000 U.S. service members are listed as missing from the 1950-53 war, and some 5,300 of the missing are believed to be in North Korea.

On Monday, an unidentified North Korean military spokesman said in a state media dispatch that the remains of American soldiers are "left here and there uncared and carried away en masse" because of building projects, land reorganization and flood damage.

The U.S. war remains "now look like no better than stones as land rezoning and other gigantic nature-remaking projects made progress" in North Korea, the spokesman said. "The Obama administration should not forget even a moment the proverb saying that even a skeleton cries out of yearning for the homeland."

Analyst Chang Yong Seok at Seoul National University said the North's statement appears aimed at applying pressure to U.S. politicians and officials ahead of November elections to resume the recovery project, which could give the North a way to get foreign currency and improved ties with Washington.

The U.S. and North Korea, which don't have formal diplomatic relations, are still technically at war because the Korean War ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty. The U.S. stations about 28,000 troops in South Korea to help deter North Korean aggression.

North Korea has been seeking better ties with the outside world in what foreign analysts say is an attempt to lure aid and investment to help revive its moribund economy. South Korean and U.S. officials have said the North must first take steps toward nuclear disarmament before talks can resume.

There were signs of easing tension earlier this month when a group of high-powered North Korean officials visited South Korea and agreed to revive senior-level talks between the rivals. But the North last week opened fire with machine guns after activists in the South launched balloons carrying anti-Pyongyang leaflets across the heavily armed border. South Korea returned fire. There were no reports of injuries or damage.


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