Family flees dream home to escape poisonous spiders 'bleeding out of the walls'

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Family flees dream home to escape poisonous spiders 'bleeding out of the walls'
The home left abandoned by the Trost family in a country club in suburban St. Louis. (KMOV)
The characteristic violin shaped mark is seen on a preserved Brown Recluse Spider displayed at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History, Wednesday, March 30, 2011, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
The home sits on the edge of a golf course within a country club. (KMOV)
Brian and Susan Trost fled with their four-year-old son. (KMOV)
A live Brown Recluse Spider crawls in a dish at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History in Washington, Wednesday, March 30, 2011. It's that time of year when the bugs emerge to bug us. Some can pose real threats _ Lyme disease from tiny ticks, West Nile virus from mosquitoes, or life-threatening allergic reactions to bee stings. But most bug bites in this country are an itchy nuisance. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
A residence in Missouri has been empty for two years likely because of a problem with 8-legged creatures. The former owners jumped ship due to brown recluse spiders.
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By RYAN GORMAN

A Missouri family was forced to flee their home when it was infested with thousands of brown recluse spiders.

Brian and Susan Trost bought the $450,000 home in 2007 and soon discovered they had as many as 6,000 poisonous housemates. Several years of exterminators failed to kill the pests off, so they left.

"It was shortly after we moved in they (the spiders) started bleeding out of the walls," Brian Trost told KMOV.

The creepy crawlers were all over the house, but appeared to be most concentrated in an atrium area leading to the basement of their dream home, the family told the station.

Susan Trost remembered one incident where her four-year-old son yelled "spider! Spider!" after seeing one of the poisonous beasts on a couch.

"Once we realized that they were brown recluse spiders, obviously, the horrifying reality set in for us," Brian Trost added.

The Trosts called in an expert who told them there were anywhere between 4,500 and 6,000 of the spiders crawling around their 2,400-square-foot country club home, they told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Susan Trost claimed to the paper she dodged one as it fell from the ceiling while she was in the shower and also saw their exoskeletons falling from light fixtures.

An exterminator ripped out their insulation and appeared to have made a dent in the problem, but was not able to eradicate the resilient arachnids.

"After the attic treatment, it seemed to help for quite a while, although we were still capturing them," she told the Post-Dispatch. "It just was a decline; they weren't gone."

The family left the home and allowed it to go into foreclosure. A subsequent lawsuit against the previous owners netted them a $472,000 judgement, but they have yet to collect.

The home now sits abandoned, covered in tarps.



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