Yousafzai, Satyarthi win Nobel Peace Prize

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Yousafzai, Satyarthi win Nobel Peace Prize
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Yousafzai, Satyarthi win Nobel Peace Prize
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 19: Malala Yousafzai attends TimesTalks Presents: I Am Malala at The French Institute on August 19, 2014 in New York City. (Photo by Noam Galai/WireImage)
Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai (2nd L) with family members brother Atal (L), mother Tor Pekai (2nd L) and father Ziauddin on August 18, 2014 at United Nations headquarters in New York before meeting with UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon. Yousafzai was attending a UN conference called '500 Days of Action for the Millennium Development Goals'. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai (C) poses with students August 18, 2014 at United Nations headquarters in New York. Yousafzai was attending a UN conference called '500 Days of Action for the Millennium Development Goals'. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon (L) presents a UN back pack to Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai (R) August 18, 2014 at United Nations headquarters in New York. Yousafzai was attending a UN conference called '500 Days of Action for the Millennium Development Goals'. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon (L) presents a copy of his book to Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai (2nd R) August 18, 2014 at United Nations headquarters in New York as as Ban's wife Yoo Soon-taek (2nd L) and Yousafzai's father Ziauddin (R) look on. Yousafzai was attending a UN conference called '500 Days of Action for the Millennium Development Goals'. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 18: Malala Yousafzai, an education and women's rights activist, meets with United Nations (UN) Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon (not seen) on August 18, 2014 in New York City. Mala also attended a conference marking the UN's Millenium Development Goals. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai arrives August 18, 2014 at United Nations headquarters in New York. Yousafzai was attending a UN conference called '500 Days of Action for the Millennium Development Goals'. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 18: Malala Yousafzai, an education and women's rights activist (C), is given the gift of a backpack from United Nations (UN) Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon (L) on August 18, 2014 in New York City. Mala also attended a conference marking the UN's Millenium Development Goals. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
GOOD MORNING AMERICA - Robin Roberts greets Pakistani teenager and education activist Malala Yousafzai backstage at GOOD MORNING AMERICA. Malala taped an interview that airs MONDAY, AUG. 18 (7:00-9:00am, ET) on the ABC Television Network. (Photo by Ida Mae Astute/ABC via Getty Images) MALALA YOUSAFZAI, ROBIN ROBERTS
GOOD MORNING AMERICA - Pakistani teenager and education activist Malala Yousafzai talks to Amy Robach on GOOD MORNING AMERICA and takes questions from an audience of schoolgirls. The interview will air MONDAY, AUG. 18 (7:00-9:00am, ET) on the ABC Television Network. (Photo by Ida Mae Astute/ABC via Getty Images) MALALA YOUSAFZAI, AMY ROBACH
GOOD MORNING AMERICA - Pakistani teenager and education activist Malala Yousafzai is interviewed on GOOD MORNING AMERICA, airing MONDAY, AUG. 18 (7:00-9:00am, ET) on the ABC Television Network. (Photo by Ida Mae Astute/ABC via Getty Images) MALALA YOUSAFZAI
PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD - JULY 31: Education rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Malala Yousafzai (C) of Pakistan displays her painting at a children's workshops at Emancipation Village on July 31, 2014 in Port of Spain, Trinidad. (Photo by Sean Drakes/LatinContent/Getty Images)
PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD - JULY 31: Education rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize nominated Malala Yousafzai (L) of Pakistan visits children's workshops at Emancipation Village on July 31, 2014 in Port of Spain, Trinidad. (Photo by Sean Drakes/LatinContent/Getty Images)
PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD - JULY 30: Education rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Malala Yousafzai of Pakistan delivers a speech at the National Academy for the Performing Arts on July 30, 2014 in Port of Spain, Trinidad. (Photo by Sean Drakes/LatinContent/Getty Images)
PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD - JULY 30: Fazal Karim (L), Minister of Tertiary Education, Nobel Peace Prize nominee Malala Yousafzai (C), and Dr. Tim Gopeesingh, Minister of Education watch a musical performance at the National Academy for the Performing Arts on July 30, 2014 in Port of Spain, Trinidad. (Photo by Sean Drakes/LatinContent/Getty Images)
PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD - JULY 30: Malala Yousafzai (L) of Pakistan poses with Elizabeth Archibald at the National Academy for the Performing Arts on July 30, 2014 in Port of Spain, Trinidad. (Photo by Sean Drakes/LatinContent/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 13: Malala Yousafzai at Good Morning America promoting her book I Am Malala on August 13, 2014 in New York City. Credit:RW/MediaPunch/IPX
Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai, centre, raises her hands with some of the escaped kidnapped school girls of government secondary school Chibok during a news confrence, in Abuja, Nigeria, Monday, July 14, 2014. Yousafzai on Monday won a promise from Nigeria’s leader to meet with the parents of some of the 219 schoolgirls held by Islamic extremists for three months. Malala celebrated her 17th birthday on Monday in Nigeria with promises to work for the release of the girls from the Boko Haram movement. (AP Photo/Olamikan Gbemiga)
Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai, left, shakes hands with Nigerian President, Goodluck Jonathan, right, at the Presidential villa, in Abuja, Nigeria, Monday, July 14, 2014. Yousafzai on Monday won a promise from Nigeria’s leader to meet with the parents of some of the 219 schoolgirls held by Islamic extremists for three months. Malala celebrated her 17th birthday on Monday in Nigeria with promises to work for the release of the girls from the Boko Haram movement. (AP Photo)
Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai, who survived being shot by the Taliban because she advocated education for girls, poses for a photograph with the organizers of Bring Back Our Girls campaign, in Abuja, Nigeria, Sunday July 13, 2014. Malala Yousafzai traveled to Abuja in Nigeria to meet the relatives of schoolgirls who were kidnapped by Boko Haram three months ago. (AP Photo/Olamikan Gbemiga)
Malala Yousafzai, visits Zaatari refugee camp near the Syrian border, in Mafraq, Jordan, Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014. A teenage Pakistani activist who came to the international limelight when she was shot by the Taliban said Tuesday that the plight of Syrian refugee children deprived of proper education was a stark reminder of the “dark days” Pakistani children under their hard-line rulers. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon)
Honoree Malala Yousafzai attends the 23rd Annual Glamour Women of the Year Awards hosted by Glamour Magazine at Carnegie Hall on Monday, Nov. 11, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)
Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai receives the Sakharov Prize 2013 from Martin Schulz, president of the European parliament, Wednesday Nov. 20, 2013, in Strasbourg eastern France. In a speech accepting the EU’s top human right award, Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai has urged the 28-nation bloc to better help the millions of children who are denied a formal education. (AP Photo/Christian Lutz)
Malala Yousafzai appears onstage at the 2013 Glamour Women of the Year Awards on on Monday, November, 11, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Brad Barket/Invision /AP Images)
Honoree Malala Yousafzai, center, and her father Ziauddin Yousafzai attend the 23rd Annual Glamour Women of the Year Awards hosted by Glamour Magazine at Carnegie Hall on Monday, Nov. 11, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)
Honoree Malala Yousafzai attends the 23rd Annual Glamour Women of the Year Awards hosted by Glamour Magazine at Carnegie Hall on Monday, Nov. 11, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)
Education activist Malala Yousafzai accepts The Women of the Year Fund Honoree Award on stage at the 2013 Glamour Women of the Year Awards on on Monday, Nov. 11, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Brad Barket/Invision /AP Images)
Malala Yousafzai appears onstage at the 2013 Glamour Women of the Year Awards on on Monday, November, 11, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Brad Barket/Invision /AP Images)
Malala Yousafzai on the cover of Time magazine on shelves at WH Smith newsagent London England UK
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai in London bookshop
US President Barack Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama, and their daughter Malia meet with Malala Yousafzai, the young Pakistani schoolgirl who was shot in the head by the Taliban a year ago in the Oval Office of the White House Oct. 11, 2013 in Washington, DC.
New York, NY, USA. 10th October 2013. Malala Yousafzai with her father and award winning journalist Christiane Amanpour appeared at the 92nd St Y on Manhattans upper east side. Malala when she was 15 was shot in the face by the Talaban because she advocated for education for girls. Malala is in the running for the Nobel Peace Prize. © Scott Houston/Alamy Live News
New York, NY, USA. 10th October 2013. Malala Yousafzai with her father and award winning journalist Christiane Amanpour appeared at the 92nd St Y on Manhattans upper east side. Malala when she was 15 was shot in the face by the Talaban because she advocated for education for girls. Malala is in the running for the Nobel Peace Prize. © Scott Houston/Alamy Live News
New York, NY, USA. 10th October 2013. Malala Yousafzai with her father and award winning journalist Christiane Amanpour appeared at the 92nd St Y on Manhattans upper east side. Malala when she was 15 was shot in the face by the Talaban because she advocated for education for girls. Malala is in the running for the Nobel Peace Prize. © Scott Houston/Alamy Live News
NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 24: Chairperson, Global March Against Child Labour Kailash Satyarthi attends a human trafficking special session during the 2009 Clinton Global Initiative at the Sheraton New York Hotel & Towers on September 24, 2009 in New York City. (Photo by Jim Spellman/WireImage)
NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 24: Kailash Satyarthi and Ndioro Ndiaye attends a human trafficking special session during the 2009 Clinton Global Initiative at the Sheraton New York Hotel & Towers on September 24, 2009 in New York City. (Photo by Bobby Bank/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 24: Kailash Satyarthi,Ndioro Ndiaye, Julia Ormond, David Arkless and Conny Czymoch attends a human trafficking special session during the 2009 Clinton Global Initiative at the Sheraton New York Hotel & Towers on September 24, 2009 in New York City. (Photo by Bobby Bank/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 24: Kailash Satyarthi attends a human trafficking special session during the 2009 Clinton Global Initiative at the Sheraton New York Hotel & Towers on September 24, 2009 in New York City. (Photo by Bobby Bank/Getty Images)
NEW DELHI,INDIA - JUNE 18: Kailash Satyarthi, noted Indian anti-child labour activist and head of the South Asian Coalition Against Child Servitude, addresses a press conference in New Delhi 18 June 1999. Satyarthi asked the Indian government to ban the worst forms of child labour. (Photo by: Ravi Raveendran/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW DELHI,INDIA - AUGUST 25: A social worker showing wounds inflicted by a seven-year-old boy's employer, a carpet manufacturer, at a news conference in New Delhi 25 August. Leading Indian child labour activist Kailash Satyarthi said more than one million child labourers are employed in South Asian carpet factories. (Photo by: Ravi Raveendran/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, : Ethel Kennedy, wife of Robert F. Kennedy, US television sports broadcaster Frank Gifford(2nd-L) and his singer-actress wife Kathie Lee(C-rear) playfully hug Jessica More(C-front), former child laborer from the Phillipines, as Kailash Satyarthi(R-rear), coordinator of the Global March Against Child Labor and an unidentified youth look on 27 May during a send-off rally for the Global March Against Child Labor in Washington, DC. The Global March has been in several countries including the US to attempt to raise awareness to the problem of child labor. AFP Photo Stephen JAFFE (Photo credit should read STEPHEN JAFFE/AFP/Getty Images)
Chilean Juan Somavia, left, Director General of the International Labor Organization (ILO), Tom Harkin, center, Senator of Iowa at the Congress of the United States, centre, and Kailash Satyarthi, Indian coordinator of the Global March against child labour, right, pose with school children of the Canton of Geneva, during the World Day Against Child Labour at the Place of Nations in front of the European headquarters of the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, June 12, 2009. (AP Photo/Keystone/Martial Trezzini)
Michel Hansenne, centre, Belgian Director General of the International Labour Organization, (ILO) introduces Jean-Jacques Oechslin, left, French President of the ILO's 86th General Assembly, to Kailash Satyarthi, Indian coordinator of the Global March against child labour in the Assembly Hall of the United Nations during the opening session of the 86th General Assembly in Geneva, Switzerland Tuesday June 2, 1998. (AP Photo/Donald Stampfli)
The participants in the Global March against child labour gesture upon their arrival in the Assembly Hall of the United Nations during the opening session of the 86th General Assembly of the International Labour Organization at Geneva, Switzerland on Tuesday, June 2,1998. Back left with arms raised Indian coordinator of the march Kailash Satyarthi. (AP Photo/Donald Stampfli)
The participants of the Global March against child labour stay on the stage of the Assembly Room of the United Nations during the address of the Indian coordinator of the march Kailash Satyarthi to the opening session of the 86th General Assembly of the International Labour Organization at Geneva, Switzerland on Tuesday, June 2,1998. (AP Photo/Donald Stampfli)
GCE president Kailash Satyarthi & mdgVOICE blogger Geetika Gupta
Kailash Satyarthi. founder Save the childhood movement
Kailash Satyarthi, President of Global Campaign for Education
Assibi Napoe y Kailash Satyarthi
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OSLO, Norway (AP) -- Taliban attack survivor Malala Yousafzai became the youngest Nobel winner ever as she and Kailash Satyarthi of India won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for working to protect children from slavery, extremism and child labor at great risk to their own lives.

By honoring a 17-year-old Muslim girl from Pakistan and a 60-year-old Hindu man from India, the Norwegian Nobel Committee linked the peace award to conflicts between world religions and neighboring nuclear powers as well as drawing attention to children's rights.

Malala Yousafzai Is Youngest Ever to Win Nobel Peace Prize

"Child slavery is a crime against humanity. Humanity itself is at stake here. A lot of work still remains but I will see the end of child labor in my lifetime," Satyarthi told The Associated Press at his office in New Delhi.

Since 1980, Satyarthi has been at the forefront of a global movement to end child slavery and exploitative child labor, which he called a "blot on humanity."

News of the award set off celebrations on the streets of Mingora, Malala's hometown in Pakistan's volatile Swat Valley, with residents greeting each other and distributing sweets. At the town's Khushal Public School, which is owned by Malala's father, students danced in celebration Friday, jumping up and down.

When she was a student there, Malala was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman two years ago for insisting that girls as well as boys have the right to an education. Surviving several operations with the help of British medical care, she continued both her activism and her studies.

Appropriately, Malala was at school Friday in the central English city of Birmingham when the Nobel was announced and remained with her classmates at the Edgbaston High School for girls. She was expected to make a statement later in the day.

Her father, Ziauddin Yousafzai, said the decision will further the rights of girls.

"(The Nobel will) boost the courage of Malala and enhance her capability to work for the cause of girls' education," he told the AP.

Malala is by far the youngest Nobel laureate, eight years younger than 1915 physics prize winner Lawrence Bragg, who was 25 when he won. Before Malala, the youngest peace prize winner was 2011 co-winner Tawakkul Karman of Yemen, a women's rights activist who was 32.

Committee chairman Thorbjoern Jagland said it was important to reward both an Indian Hindu and a Pakistani Muslim for their common struggle for education and against extremism. The two will split the Nobel award of $1.1 million.

"There is a lot of extremism coming from this part of the world. It is partly coming from the fact that young people don't have a future. They don't have education. They don't have a job," Jagland told the AP.

Pakistani Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan said the decision "has given pride to the whole of Pakistan." India's President Pranab Mukherjee said the prize recognized "the contributions of India's vibrant civil society in addressing complex social problems such as child labor."

By highlighting children's rights, the committee widened the scope of the peace prize, which in its early days was only given for efforts to end or prevent armed conflicts. The 1965 peace prize had a similar theme, going to the U.N. Children's Fund, UNICEF.

"In conflict-ridden areas in particular, the violation of children leads to the continuation of violence from generation to generation," the Nobel committee said.

Commentators around the world praised the Nobel committee for focusing on children.

"The biggest threat to the Taliban is a girl with a book," said Margot Wallstrom, Sweden's foreign minister and a former U.N. envoy on Sexual Violence in Conflict.

"The true winners today are the world's children," said U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

Raised in Pakistan's ruggedly beautiful, politically volatile Swat Valley, Malala was barely 11 years old when she began championing girls' education, speaking out in TV interviews. The Taliban had overrun her hometown of Mingora, terrorizing residents, threatening to blow up girls' schools, ordering teachers and students into all-encompassing burqas.

She was critically injured on Oct. 9, 2012, when a Taliban gunman boarded her school bus and shot her in the head. She survived through luck - the bullet did not enter her brain - and by the quick intervention of British doctors visiting Pakistan.

Flown to Britain for specialist treatment at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, she underwent numerous surgeries but made a strong recovery. Malala now lives with her father, mother and two brothers in Birmingham and has been showered with human rights prizes, including the European Parliament's Sakharov Award.

Yet her memoir, "I Am Malala," published last year, reminded the world that she was still just a teenager - one who likes TV shows such as "Ugly Betty" and the cooking show "MasterChef," who worries about her clothes and her hair and wishes she was taller.

The Nobel committee said Satyarthi was carrying on the tradition of another great Indian, Mahatma Gandhi, who remains the most notable omission in the 113-year history of the Nobel Peace Prize.

"Showing great personal courage, Kailash Satyarthi, maintaining Gandhi's tradition, has headed various forms of protests and demonstrations, all peaceful, focusing on the grave exploitation of children for financial gain," the committee said.

A.N.S. Ahmed, a well-known sociologist in India, said the award should prod the Indian government to do more in a country where a large number of children must support their families by engaging in dangerous jobs.

"The award will have a deep impact not just on the Indian government, but also on the civil society, to work with passion and improve the condition of children by enforcing their rights," he said.

Former Indian diplomat Lalit Mansingh praised the Nobel committee for a decision he said would help not only children but regional tensions.

"(They are) conscious of helping in conflict resolution. The award, especially at a time when India-Pakistan relations are under stress, is a nice gesture," he said.

The founder of the Nobel Prizes, Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, said the prize should go to "the person who shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses."

The committee has interpreted those instructions differently over time, widening the concept of peace work to include efforts to improve human rights, fight poverty and clean up the environment.

The Nobel Prizes in medicine, chemistry, physics and literature were announced earlier this week. The economics award will be announced on Monday.

All awards will be handed out on Dec. 10, the anniversary of Nobel's death in 1896.

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