First Ebola patient diagnosed in the US dead

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Man Diagnosed With Ebola In Texas Has Died

DALLAS (AP) -- The first Ebola patient diagnosed in the United States died in a Dallas hospital Wednesday, a little more than a week after his diagnosis exposed gaps in the nation's defenses against the disease and set off a scramble to track down anyone exposed to him.

Thomas Eric Duncan, 42, was pronounced dead at 7:51 a.m. at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, where he was admitted Sept. 28 and had been kept in isolation, according to spokesman Wendell Watson.

"Mr. Duncan succumbed to an insidious disease," Watson said in a statement.

Another statement has been made public by Duncan's fiance, shown below:

Duncan carried the deadly virus with him from his home in Liberia, though he showed no symptoms when he left for the United States. He arrived in Dallas on Sept. 20 and fell ill several days later. His condition was downgraded during the weekend from serious to critical.

Others in Dallas still are being monitored as health officials try to contain the virus that has ravaged West Africa, with more than 3,400 people reported dead. They also are trying to tamp down anxiety among residents frightened of contracting Ebola, though the disease can be spread only through direct contact with the bodily fluids of an already sick person.

Health officials have identified 10 people, including seven health workers, who had direct contact with Duncan while he was contagious. Another 38 people also may have come into contact with him. The four people living in the northeast Dallas apartment where Duncan stayed have been isolated in a private residence.

"The past week has been an enormous test of our health system, but for one family it has been far more personal ... They have our sincere condolences, and we are keeping them in our thoughts," Dr. David Lakey, commissioner of the Texas Department of State Health Services, said in statement. "We'll continue every effort to contain the spread of the virus and protect people from this threat."

Of the five Ebola patients treated so far in the U.S., Duncan was the only one not cared for in one of the special hospital units set up to deal with highly dangerous germs. That's because health officials knew the others had Ebola at the time they decided where the patients should go, whereas Duncan sought care at the Texas hospital on his own.

Health officials also have said that any hospital with isolation capabilities can treat Ebola patients, but Duncan's death is sure to renew attention on the Texas hospital's response, especially missing the chance to treat him two days sooner, when he first sought care.

There is no way to know whether any specific treatment or step might have saved his life, just as whether any experimental drug he did or did not receive helped. He was getting advanced care - dialysis to treat kidney failure, and a breathing machine, and experimental antiviral drug - when he died.

Officials have said everyone who potentially had contact with Duncan is being monitored for 21 days, the normal incubation period for the disease.

Duncan passed an airport health screening in Liberia, where doctors measured his temperature as normal and found no signs of Ebola symptoms. But a few days after he arrived, he began to have a fever, headache and abdominal pain.

He went to the emergency room of Texas Health Presbyterian in Dallas on Sept. 24, but was sent home. By Sept. 28, his condition had worsened and an ambulance took him back to the hospital where he stayed in isolation.

Texas Mayor Mike Rawlings had this to say today:

Duncan's family had visited Texas Health Presbyterian earlier in the week and glimpsed Duncan using a camera system, but said Tuesday they had declined to view him again because the first time had been too upsetting.

"What we saw was very painful. It didn't look good," Duncan's nephew, Josephus Weeks, said Tuesday.

The hospital has changed its explanation several times about when Duncan arrived and what he said about his travel history. It has acknowledged that Duncan told them on his first visit that he came from West Africa.

The Dallas County medical examiner's office will not be receiving Duncan's body, but spokesman Stephen Kurtz said he did not know Wednesday what the alternate arrangements would be.

Everyone who potentially had contact with Duncan will be monitored for 21 days, the normal incubation period for the disease.

Duncan passed an airport health screening in Liberia, where doctors took his temperature and found no other signs of Ebola symptoms. But a few days after he arrived, he began to have a fever, headache and abdominal pain.

He went to the emergency room of Texas Health Presbyterian in Dallas on Sept. 24, but was sent home. By Sept. 27, his condition had worsened. An ambulance that day took him back to the hospital, where he stayed in isolation.

The hospital has changed its explanation several times about when Duncan arrived and what he said about his travel history. It has acknowledged that Duncan told them on his first visit that he came from West Africa.

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First Ebola patient diagnosed in the US dead
In this picture taken Sunday, Sept. 28, 2014, Finda Saah, 28, holds six-week-old Prosper Junior, as 5 year old Alice and 13-year old son Augustin look on, at their St Paul Bridge home in Monrovia, Liberia. Finda lost her husband to the deadly Ebola virus and gave birth three days later. Ebola has killed more than 1800 people in Liberia this year. As the death toll from Ebola soars, crowded clinics are turning over beds as quickly as patients are dying. This leaves social workers and psychologists struggling to keep pace and notify families, who must wait outside for fear of contagion. Also, under a government decree, all Ebola victims must be cremated, leaving families in unbearable pain with no chance for goodbye, no body to bury. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Medical practitioners shout against Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy during his visit to the Carlos III hospital in Madrid, Spain, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014. A Spanish hospital official says the nursing assistant infected with Ebola is "stable," hours after authorities described her condition as critical. She is the first person known to have caught the disease outside the outbreak zone in West Africa. She contracted the virus while helping treat a Spanish missionary who became infected in West Africa, and later died. (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
Princess Duo, left, and Mamie Mangoe, right, both natively of Liberia who now live in Dallas, stand holding lit candles as they pray during a service at Wilshire Baptist Church that was dedicated to Thomas Eric Duncan, Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014, in Dallas. Nearly 150 persons attended the service for Duncan who died Wednesday of complication from Ebola. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)
Karsiah Duncan son of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan listens during a news conference Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014, in Dallas. "I'm just praying my dad will make it out safely," Karsiah said at the news conference hosted by a Dallas church. (AP Photo/Tim Sharp)
Karsiah Duncan, center, son of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan speaks during a news conference while Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings, left rear, and Saymendy Lloyd look on, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014, in Dallas. (AP Photo/Tim Sharp)
AP10ThingsToSee - Nowa Paye, 9, is taken to an ambulance after showing signs of the Ebola infection in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Three members of District 13 ambulance service traveled to the village to pickup six suspected Ebola sufferers that had been quarantined by villagers. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
FILE - In this Thursday Oct. 2, 2014 file photo, Mercy Kennedy, 9, cries as community activists approach her outside her home on 72nd SKD Boulevard in Monrovia, Liberia, a day after her mother was taken away by an ambulance to an Ebola ward. Neighbors wailed Thursday upon learning that Mercy’s mother had died; she was among the cluster of cases that includes Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man now hospitalized in Texas. On Thursday, little Mercy walked around in a daze in a torn nightgown and flip-flops, pulling up the fabric to wipe her tears as a group of workers from the neighborhood task force followed the sound of wailing through the thick grove of banana trees and corn plants. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)
Stanley Williams, 3, and Tete Williams, 12, sister of Marthalene Williams, 19, the pregnant woman Thomas Eric Duncan helped when she became ill and who died of Ebola, walk in from of the group of flats where Duncan, a Liberian man now hospitalized in Texas, was a tenant on 72nd SKD Boulevard during his stay in Liberia, in Monrovia, Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014. Since the announcement of his illness, Duncan has become a symbol of how Ebola could spread within the United States. Here in Liberia, though, he is just another neighbor infected by a virulent Ebola cluster ravaging this neighborhood of tin-roof homes along 72nd SKD Boulevard.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
This 2011 photo provided by Wilmot Chayee shows Thomas Eric Duncan at a wedding in Ghana. In September 2014, Duncan became the first patient in the U.S. diagnosed with Ebola. He died in a Dallas hospital on Wednesday morning, October 8, 2014. (AP Photo/Wilmot Chayee)
A sign points to the emergency room at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital where Thomas Eric Duncan, the Ebola patient who traveled from Liberia to Dallas, is being treated Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014, in Dallas. Duncan remains in isolation, where he was listed in critical condition Saturday. At the end of the week, Texas health officials said they had narrowed to about 50 the group of people they were monitoring who had some exposure to Duncan. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
A man pushes a wheelbarrow containing a woman thought to be a victim of the Ebola virus at the Ebola treatment centre at Island hospital in Monrovia on October 2, 2014. Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said Wednesday the Ebola outbreak that has devastated her country was showing signs of stabilising as the official death toll rose again.. AFP PHOTO / PASCAL GUYOT (Photo credit should read PASCAL GUYOT/AFP/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 04: Eric Williams (C) , a U.S. Congressional candidate, Steve Oriabure (L), from the Organization of Nigerian Nationals, and Shadiya Abdi speak to the media outside the Ivy Apartment complex where the confirmed Ebola virus patient was staying on October 4, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. They spoke to the media on their concerns about how the Ebola case is affecting the community. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
A young man retrieves food supplies and personal materials left by the North Texas Food Bank and the Red Cross on the front stoop of an apartment at The Ivy Apartments complex, Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014, in Dallas. Dallas County officials have ordered family members who had contact with the patient diagnosed with the Ebola virus to stay inside their home. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)
Hazardous material cleaners prepare to hang black plastic outside the apartment in Dallas, Friday, Oct. 3, 2014, where Thomas Eric Duncan, the Ebola patient who traveled from Liberia to Dallas stayed last week. The family living there has been confined under armed guard while being monitored by health officials. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Hazardous material cleaners prepare to hang black plastic outside the apartment in Dallas, Friday, Oct. 3, 2014, where Thomas Eric Duncan, the Ebola patient who traveled from Liberia to Dallas stayed last week. The family living there has been confined under armed guard while being monitored by health officials. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Hazardous material cleaners arrives at the apartment complex in Dallas, Friday, Oct. 3, 2014, where Thomas Eric Duncan, the Ebola patient who traveled from Liberia to Dallas stayed last week. The crew is expected to remove items including towels and bed sheets used by Duncan, who is being treated at an isolation unit at a Dallas hospital. The family living there has been confined under armed guard while being monitored by health officials. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Hazardous material cleaners arrives at the apartment complex in Dallas, Friday, Oct. 3, 2014, where Thomas Eric Duncan, the Ebola patient who traveled from Liberia to Dallas stayed last week. The crew is expected to remove items including towels and bed sheets used by Duncan, who is being treated at an isolation unit at a Dallas hospital. The family living there has been confined under armed guard while being monitored by health officials. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
A young man retrieves supplies left on the front stoop of an apartment where an Ebola infected man had stayed at The Ivy Apartments complex in Dallas, Friday, Oct. 3, 2014. Dallas city officials asked the family who resides at the apartment to remain in their home. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
A young man retrieves supplies left on the front stoop of an apartment where an Ebola infected man had stayed at The Ivy Apartments complex in Dallas, Friday, Oct. 3, 2014. Dallas city officials asked the family who resides at the apartment to remain in their home. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
A hazardous materials cleaning company truck sits parked outside The Ivy Apartments, Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014, in Dallas. Dallas city officials asked a family who resides at the complex who had contact with a man diagnosed with the Ebola virus to remain in their home. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)
Mercy Kennedy, 9, cries Thursday Oct. 2, 2014. as community activists approach her outside her home on 72nd SKD Boulevard in Monrovia, Liberia, a day after her mother was taken away by an ambulance to an Ebola ward. Neighbors wailed Thursday upon learning that Mercy’s mother had died; she was among the cluster of cases that includes Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man now hospitalized in Texas. On Thursday, little Mercy walked around in a daze in a torn nightgown and flip-flops, pulling up the fabric to wipe her tears as a group of workers from the neighborhood task force followed the sound of wailing through the thick grove of banana trees and corn plants.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
AP10ThingsToSee - Nowa Paye, 9, is taken to an ambulance after showing signs of the Ebola infection in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Three members of District 13 ambulance service traveled to the village to pickup six suspected Ebola sufferers that had been quarantined by villagers. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
A man leaves a wheelbarrow containuing a woman thought to be a victim of the Ebola virus at the Ebola treatment centre at Island hospital in Monrovia on October 2, 2014. Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said Wednesday the Ebola outbreak that has devastated her country was showing signs of stabilising as the official death toll rose again.. AFP PHOTO / PASCAL GUYOT (Photo credit should read PASCAL GUYOT/AFP/Getty Images)
A man pushes a wheelbarrow containing a woman thought to be a victim of the Ebola virus at the Ebola treatment centre at Island hospital in Monrovia on October 2, 2014. Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said Wednesday the Ebola outbreak that has devastated her country was showing signs of stabilising as the official death toll rose again.. AFP PHOTO / PASCAL GUYOT (Photo credit should read PASCAL GUYOT/AFP/Getty Images)
A man pushes a wheelbarrow containing a woman thought to be a victim of the Ebola virus, follwed by her relatives at the Ebola treatment centre at Island hospital in Monrovia on October 2, 2014. Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said Wednesday the Ebola outbreak that has devastated her country was showing signs of stabilising as the official death toll rose again.. AFP PHOTO / PASCAL GUYOT (Photo credit should read PASCAL GUYOT/AFP/Getty Images)
A man pushes a wheelbarrow containing a woman thought to be a victim of the Ebola virus at the Ebola treatment centre at Island hospital in Monrovia on October 2, 2014. Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said Wednesday the Ebola outbreak that has devastated her country was showing signs of stabilising as the official death toll rose again.. AFP PHOTO / PASCAL GUYOT (Photo credit should read PASCAL GUYOT/AFP/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 02: A woman delivers bottled water and toilet paper to residents in a unit at the Ivy Apartments, where the confirmed Ebola virus patient was staying, on October 2, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. The first confirmed Ebola virus patient in the United States was staying with family members at The Ivy Apartment complex before being treated at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas. State and local officials are working with federal officials to monitor other individuals that had contact with the confirmed patient. (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
Dallas County Health and Human Services Director Zachary Thompson and Christopher Perkins, D.O., M.P.H. Medical Director / Health Authority with DCHHS walk out of an apartment unit at The Ivy Apartment Complex, Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014, in Dallas. Dallas County officials have ordered family members who had contact with the patient diagnosed with the Ebola virus to stay inside their home. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)
Thomas Duncan carries a woman HRS before she dies from #Ebola, then travels to TX. @CDCgov team now in Dallas. @AMHQ http://t.co/udwtA0eiGH
A young man retrieves food supplies and personal materials left by the North Texas Food Bank and the Red Cross on the front stoop of an apartment at The Ivy Apartments complex, Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014, in Dallas. Dallas County officials have ordered family members who had contact with the patient diagnosed with the Ebola virus to stay inside their home. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)
Dallas County Health and Human Services Director Zachary Thompson stands outside of an apartment unit at The Ivy Apartment Complex after paying a visit, Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014, in Dallas. Dallas County officials have ordered family members who had contact with the patient diagnosed with the Ebola virus to stay inside their home. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 01: Texas Govenor Rick Perry answers questions related to the first confirmed case of the Ebola virus at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas on October 1, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. State and local officials are working with federal officials to monitor other individuals that had contact with the confirmed patient. (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: A general view of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. The patient who had recently traveled to Dallas from Liberia marks the first case of this strain of Ebola that has been diagnosed outside of West Africa. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: Dr. Edward Goodman, epidemiologist at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, answers questions during a media conference at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
Yarkpawoto Paye, 84, is taken to an ambulance after showing signs of Ebola infection in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Three members of District 13 ambulance service traveled to the village to pickup six suspected Ebola sufferers that had been quarantined by villagers. Aid donations are still inadequate, as the international community tries to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the disease which has hit Liberia the hardest.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: Dr. Edward Goodman, epidemiologist at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, and Dr. Mark Lester, Southeast Zone clinical leader for Texas Health Resources, answer questions during a media conference at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: Dr. Edward Goodman, epidemiologist at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, and Dr. Mark Lester, Southeast Zone clinical leader for Texas Health Resources, answer questions during a media conference at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
Nowa Paye, 9, is taken to an ambulance after showing signs of the Ebola infection in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia,Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Three members of District 13 ambulance service traveled to the village to pickup six suspected Ebola sufferers that had been quarantined by villagers. Aid donations are still inadequate, as the international community tries to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the disease which has hit Liberia the hardest. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: A general view of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. The patient who had recently traveled to Dallas from Liberia marks the first case of this strain of Ebola that has been diagnosed outside of West Africa. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: Traffic moves past Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. The patient who had recently traveled to Dallas from Liberia marks the first case of this strain of Ebola that has been diagnosed outside of West Africa. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
Marie Nyan, 26, whose mother died of Ebola, carries her son Nathaniel Edward, 2, to an ambulance after showing signs of Ebola infection in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Three members of District 13 ambulance service traveled to the village to pickup six suspected Ebola sufferers that had been quarantined. Aid donations from western countries are still inadequate, as the international community tries to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the disease which has hit Liberia the hardest. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: Traffic moves past Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. The patient who had recently traveled to Dallas from Liberia marks the first case of this strain of Ebola that has been diagnosed outside of West Africa. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: Dr. Edward Goodman, epidemiologist at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, and Dr. Mark Lester, Southeast Zone clinical leader for Texas Health Resources, answer questions during a media conference at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
A woman being discharged from the Island Clinic Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia, is sprayed with disinfectant Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Six months into the world’s worst-ever Ebola outbreak, and the first to happen in an unprepared West Africa, the gap between what has been sent by other countries and private groups and what is desperately needed is huge. Even as countries try to marshal more resources to close the gap, those needs threaten to become much greater, and possibly even insurmountable. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: Dr. Edward Goodman, epidemiologist at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, answers questions during a media conference at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. The patient who had recently traveled to Dallas from Liberia marks the first case of this strain of Ebola that has been diagnosed outside of West Africa. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: A general view of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. The patient who had recently traveled to Dallas from Liberia marks the first case of this strain of Ebola that has been diagnosed outside of West Africa. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: Dr. Edward Goodman, epidemiologist at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, and Dr. Mark Lester, Southeast Zone clinical leader for Texas Health Resources, answer questions during a media conference at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: Traffic moves past Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. The patient who had recently traveled to Dallas from Liberia marks the first case of this strain of Ebola that has been diagnosed outside of West Africa. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: Traffic moves past Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. The patient who had recently traveled to Dallas from Liberia marks the first case of this strain of Ebola that has been diagnosed outside of West Africa. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: A general view of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. The patient who had recently traveled to Dallas from Liberia marks the first case of this strain of Ebola that has been diagnosed outside of West Africa. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: A medical transport van moves past Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. The patient who had recently traveled to Dallas from Liberia marks the first case of this strain of Ebola that has been diagnosed outside of West Africa. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: Dr. Edward Goodman, epidemiologist at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, explains the precautions taken to prevent the spread of the Ebola virus during a media conference at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the disease on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 30: Dr. Edward Goodman, epidemiologist at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, explains the precautions taken to prevent the spread of the Ebola virus during a media conference at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas where a patient has been diagnosed with the disease on September 30, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
Residents of the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia, watch members of District 13 ambulance service disinfect a room as they pick up six suspected Ebola sufferers that had been quarantined, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Six months into the world’s worst-ever Ebola outbreak, and the first to happen in an unprepared West Africa, the gap between what has been sent by other countries and private groups and what is desperately needed is huge. Even as countries try to marshal more resources to close the gap, those needs threaten to become much greater, and possibly even insurmountable. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Mr. Kollis, center, who shows signs of possible Ebola infection, refuses to leave his home and board a District 13 ambulance dispatched to fetch him in Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Unable to force patients into the ambulance, the crew left Mr. Kollis behind. Aid donations from western countries are still inadequate, as the international community tries to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the disease which has hit Liberia the hardest.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
A District 13 ambulance rushes through traffic towards the Island Clinic Ebola treatment unit with six patients showing signs of Ebola infection from the village of Freeman Reserve in Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Aid donations from western countries are still inadequate, as the international community tries to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the disease which has hit Liberia the hardest. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Residents of the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia, watch members of District 13 ambulance service pickup six suspected Ebola sufferers that had been quarantined Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Aid donations are still inadequate, as the international community tries to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the disease which has hit Liberia the hardest. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this picture taken Sunday, Sept. 28, 2014, Kumba "survivor" Fayiah, 11, sits with relatives in her St Paul Bridge home in Monrovia, Liberia. Fayah , who lost both parents and her sister, recovered from the Ebola virus and is now living with her extended family. As the death toll from Ebola soars, crowded clinics are turning over beds as quickly as patients are dying. This leaves social workers and psychologists struggling to keep pace and notify families, who must wait outside for fear of contagion. Also, under a government decree, all Ebola victims must be cremated, leaving families in unbearable pain with no chance for goodbye, no body to bury. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Patients being discharged from the Island Clinic Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia, wait to be sprayed with disinfectant, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Six months into the world’s worst-ever Ebola outbreak, and the first to happen in an unprepared West Africa, the gap between what has been sent by other countries and private groups and what is desperately needed is huge. Even as countries try to marshal more resources to close the gap, those needs threaten to become much greater, and possibly even insurmountable. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Monrovia residents watch an ambulance carrying suspected Ebola sufferers rush to the Island Clinic Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Six months into the world’s worst-ever Ebola outbreak, and the first to happen in an unprepared West Africa, the gap between what has been sent by other countries and private groups and what is desperately needed is huge. Even as countries try to marshal more resources to close the gap, those needs threaten to become much greater, and possibly even insurmountable. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
A list showing the names of the day's deceased is taped on the door of the Island Clinic Ebola treatment unit in Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Six months into the world’s worst-ever Ebola outbreak, and the first to happen in an unprepared West Africa, the gap between what has been sent by other countries and private groups and what is desperately needed is huge. Even as countries try to marshal more resources to close the gap, those needs threaten to become much greater, and possibly even insurmountable. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Nowa Paye, 9, is taken to an ambulance after showing signs of Ebola infection in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Three members of District 13 ambulance service traveled to the village to pickup six suspected Ebola sufferer that had been quarantined.Aid donations from western countries are still inadequate, as the international community tries to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the disease which has hit Liberia the hardest. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Gordon Kamara, left, is sprayed by Konah Deno after they loaded six patients suspected to have been infected by the Ebola virus into their ambulance in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Aid donations from western countries are still inadequate, as the international community tries to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the disease which has hit Liberia the hardest.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Monrovia residents beg a District 13 ambulance crew to take with them Mr. Kollis who shows signs of possible Ebola infection but refuses to leave his home in Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Unable to force patients into the ambulance, the crew left Mr. Kollis behind. Aid donations from western countries are still inadequate, as the international community tries to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the disease which has hit Liberia the hardest.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
A District 13 ambulance stops on the side of the road looking for suspected Ebola sufferers in Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Aid donations from western countries are still inadequate, as the international community tries to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the disease which has hit Liberia the hardest.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Nowa Paye, 9, is taken to an ambulance after showing signs of Ebola infection in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Three members of District 13 ambulance service travelled to the village to pickup six suspected Ebola sufferers that had been quarantined Six months into the world’s worst-ever Ebola outbreak, and the first to happen in an unprepared West Africa, the gap between what has been sent by other countries and private groups and what is desperately needed is huge. Even as countries try to marshal more resources to close the gap, those needs threaten to become much greater, and possibly even insurmountable. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Marie Nyan, 26, whose mother died of Ebola, gives water to her son Nathaniel Edward, 2, as they wait to be taken by an ambulance after showing signs of Ebola infection in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Three members of District 13 ambulance service traveled to the village to pickup six suspected Ebola sufferers that had been quarantined. Aid donations from western countries are still inadequate, as the international community tries to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the disease which has hit Liberia the hardest.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Yarkpawoto Paye, 84, is taken to an ambulance after showing signs of Ebola infection in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia,Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Three members of District 13 ambulance service traveled to the village to pickup six suspected Ebola sufferers that had been quarantined. Aid donations from western countries are still inadequate, as the international community tries to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the disease which has hit Liberia the hardest.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Residents of the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia, watch members of District 13 ambulance service pickup six suspected Ebola sufferers that had been quarantined Tuesday Sept. 30, 2014. Aid donations are still inadequate, as the international community tries to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the disease which has hit Liberia the hardest. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this picture taken Sunday, Sept. 28, 2014, Julius Prout, 32, poses for a photograph in front of the St Paul Bridge community clinic where he works in Monrovia, Liberia. Falling victim to the Ebola virus after treating more than a dozen others infected, following a traditional funeral, Prout was wrongly declared dead, prompting family members to hold two wakes in his memory. A registered nurse, Prout stunned relative when he called them after recovering from the deadly disease. Prout is now back in his neighborhood, immune from Ebola and eager to help other victims. As the death toll from Ebola soars, crowded clinics are turning over beds as quickly as patients are dying. This leaves social workers and psychologists struggling to keep pace and notify families, who must wait outside for fear of contagion. Also, under a government decree, all Ebola victims must be cremated, leaving families in unbearable pain with no chance for goodbye, no body to bury. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
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