Ebola escapes Europe's defenses; pet dog must die

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Ebola escapes Europe's defenses; pet dog must die
A protester holds a placard reading 'We are all Teresa' during a demonstration in support of Spanish nurse Teresa Romero infected with the deadly Ebola virus in Madrid on October 11, 2014. Spanish healthcare workers and unions complain of a long list of failings in the case of a nurse who contracted Ebola while treating two elderly missionaries who died from the virus. AFP PHOTO / CURTO DE LA TORRE (Photo credit should read CURTO DE LA TORRE/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters hold a banner during a demonstration in support of Spanish nurse Teresa Romero infected with the deadly Ebola virus in Madrid on October 11, 2014. Spanish healthcare workers and unions complain of a long list of failings in the case of a nurse who contracted Ebola while treating two elderly missionaries who died from the virus. The banner reads: 'We are all Teresa' AFP PHOTO / CURTO DE LA TORRE (Photo credit should read CURTO DE LA TORRE/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters take part in a demonstration called by PACMA (Animalist Party Against Mistreatment to Animals) after the dog of a Spanish nurse infected with Ebola in Madrid was put down, in Bilbao on October 11, 2014. Excalibur, the dog of Spanish nurse Teresa Romero infected with Ebola in Madrid, was put down on October 8 by health authorities who feared it could spread the deadly disease, despite a campaign to spare him by animal rights activists. AFP PHOTO / RAFA RIVAS (Photo credit should read RAFA RIVAS/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters hold placards during a demonstration called by PACMA (Animalist Party Against Mistreatment to Animals) after the dog of a Spanish nurse infected with Ebola in Madrid was put down, in Bilbao on October 11, 2014. Excalibur, the dog of Spanish nurse Teresa Romero infected with Ebola in Madrid, was put down on October 8 by health authorities who feared it could spread the deadly disease, despite a campaign to spare him by animal rights activists. AFP PHOTO / RAFA RIVAS (Photo credit should read RAFA RIVAS/AFP/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - OCTOBER 10: Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy (Centre) gives a speech, watched by Madrid Regional President Ignacio Gonzalez (L) and Carlos III hospital manager Rafael Perez Santamarina (R) in front door of Carlos III hospital where nurse Teresa Romero is being treated for the Ebola virus, in Madrid, Spain, on October 10, 2014. 13 people are quarantined as a precaution in hospital following the admission of Spanish nurse Teresa Romero infected with the ebola virus. (Photo by Senhan Bolelli/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - OCTOBER 10: A group of health workers protest for the support of Teresa Romero in front door of Carlos III hospital where nurse Teresa Romero is being treated for the Ebola virus, in Madrid, Spain, on October 10, 2014. 13 people are quarantined as a precaution in hospital following the admission of Spanish nurse Teresa Romero infected with the ebola virus. (Photo by Senhan Bolelli/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato arrives to meet regional health advisors to reveal the government's new measures in the fights against ebola virus in Madrid on October 10, 2014. Spain said Friday it was setting up a special government committee to coordinate the national fight against Ebola after a nurse in Madrid became infected with the deadly disease. The health minister and officials from several other ministries will form a 'special committee for the management of the Ebola disease in Spain,' deputy premier Soraya Saenz de Santamaria told a news conference. AFP PHOTO / PIERRE-PHILIPPE MARCOU (Photo credit should read PIERRE-PHILIPPE MARCOU/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters wearing medical masks take part in a demonstration in support of Spanish nurse Teresa Romero infected with the deadly Ebola virus and against budget cuts and privatisations in Madrid on October 11, 2014. Spanish healthcare workers and unions complain of a long list of failings in the case of a nurse who contracted Ebola while treating two elderly missionaries who died from the virus. AFP PHOTO / CURTO DE LA TORRE (Photo credit should read CURTO DE LA TORRE/AFP/Getty Images)
A medical practitioner wearing protective clothing stands next to an isolated patient on the sixth floor of the the Carlos III hospital in Madrid, Spain, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014. A Spanish hospital official says Teresa Romero, the nursing assistant infected with Ebola is "stable," hours after authorities described her condition as critical. She is the first person known to have caught the disease outside the outbreak zone in West Africa. Romero contracted the virus while helping treat a Spanish missionary who became infected in West Africa, and later died. (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
A U.S. TV journalist reports from outside the Carlos III Hospital in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. Spanish and foreign media are camped outside the hospital while Spain placed in quarantine the husband of a Spanish nurse who has tested positive for the Ebola virus in the first known transmission outside West Africa. Public Health Director Mercedes Vinuesa told Parliament on Tuesday that authorities were drawing up a list of other people who may have had contact with the nurse so that they can be monitored. The nurse had helped treat a Spanish priest who died Sept. 25 in a Madrid hospital designated for treating Ebola patients. He had been flown home from Sierra Leone. The nurse was hospitalized in Madrid on Monday (AP Photo/Paul White)
Police clear the street as dozens of protestors shout slogans calling for the resignation of Spain's Health Minister Ana Mato, in front of the Health Ministry building in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. Three more people were placed under quarantine for Ebola at a Madrid hospital where a Spanish nurse became infected, authorities said Thursday. More than 50 other possible contacts were being monitored. The nurse, who had cared for a Spanish priest who died of Ebola, was the first case of Ebola being transmitted outside of West Africa, where a months-long outbreak has killed at least 3,500 people and infected at least twice as many. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)
Dozens of protestors shout slogans calling for the resignation of Spain's Health Minister Ana Mato, in front of the Health Ministry building in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. Three more people were placed under quarantine for Ebola at a Madrid hospital where a Spanish nurse became infected, authorities said Thursday. More than 50 other possible contacts were being monitored. The nurse, who had cared for a Spanish priest who died of Ebola, was the first case of Ebola being transmitted outside of West Africa, where a months-long outbreak has killed at least 3,500 people and infected at least twice as many. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)
A neighbor looks down from a balcony of a housing estate, where it is believed the nursing assistant who was tested positive for Ebola and her husband live in Madrid, Spain,Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. Three more people were placed under quarantine for Ebola at a Madrid hospital where a Spanish nursing assistant became infected, authorities said Tuesday. More than 50 other possible contacts were being monitored. The nurse, who had cared for a Spanish priest who died of Ebola, was the first case of Ebola being transmitted outside of West Africa, where a months-long outbreak has killed at least 3,500 people and infected at least twice as many. (AP Photo/Paul White)
A police officer shouts to photographers in the grounds of a housing estate, where it is believed the nursing assistant who was tested positive for Ebola and her husband live in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. Three more people were placed under quarantine for Ebola at a Madrid hospital where a Spanish nursing assistant became infected, authorities said Tuesday. More than 50 other possible contacts were being monitored. The nurse, who had cared for a Spanish priest who died of Ebola, was the first case of Ebola being transmitted outside of West Africa, where a months-long outbreak has killed at least 3,500 people and infected at least twice as many. (AP Photo/Paul White)
Dozens of protestors shout slogans, calling for the resignation of Spain's Health Minister Ana Mato, in front of the Health Ministry building in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. Three more people were placed under quarantine for Ebola at a Madrid hospital where a Spanish nurse became infected, authorities said Thursday. More than 50 other possible contacts were being monitored. The nurse, who had cared for a Spanish priest who died of Ebola, was the first case of Ebola being transmitted outside of West Africa, where a months-long outbreak has killed at least 3,500 people and infected at least twice as many. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)
Police walk on the grounds of a housing estate where it is believed the nursing assistant who was tested positive for Ebola and her husband live in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. Three more people were placed under quarantine for Ebola at a Madrid hospital where a Spanish nursing assistant became infected, authorities said Tuesday. More than 50 other possible contacts were being monitored. (AP Photo/Paul White)
People walk by an advertising calling for financial help to fight Ebola in Africa in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. Three more people were placed under quarantine for Ebola at a Madrid hospital where a Spanish nurse became infected, authorities said Thursday. More than 50 other possible contacts were being monitored. The nurse, who had cared for a Spanish priest who died of Ebola, was the first case of Ebola being transmitted outside of West Africa, where a months-long outbreak has killed at least 3,500 people and infected at least twice as many. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)
Spain's Health Minister Ana Mato speaks during a meeting between authorities of the Health Ministry and the Madrid Regional Health Council in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. Three more people were placed under quarantine for Ebola at a Madrid hospital where a Spanish nurse became infected, authorities said Thursday. More than 50 other possible contacts were being monitored. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)
Tourists travel on a Madrid City tour bus as an advertising calling for financial help to fight Ebola in Africa is displayed on a bus stop in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. Three more people were placed under quarantine for Ebola at a Madrid hospital where a Spanish nurse became infected, authorities said Thursday. More than 50 other possible contacts were being monitored. The nurse, who had cared for a Spanish priest who died of Ebola, was the first case of Ebola being transmitted outside of West Africa, where a months-long outbreak has killed at least 3,500 people and infected at least twice as many. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)
Hospital staff members walk back into the Carlos III hospital in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014 where a Spanish nurse who is believed to have contracted the ebola virus from a 69-year-old Spanish priest is being treated after testing positive for the virus. The hospital staff held a small protest and demanded the resignation of Health Minister Ana Mato for the handling of the case. Raising fresh concern around the world, the nurse in Spain became the first person known to catch Ebola outside the outbreak zone in West Africa. In Spain, the stricken nurse had been part of a team that treated two missionaries flown home to Spain after becoming infected with Ebola in West Africa. The nurse's only symptom was a fever, but the infection was confirmed by two tests, Spanish health officials said. She was being treated in isolation, while authorities drew up a list of people she had had contact with. (AP Photo/Paul White)
A workers makes a delivery at the entrance of the Carlos III hospital in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014 where a Spanish nurse who is believed to have contracted the ebola virus from a 69-year-old Spanish priest is being treated after testing positive for the virus. Raising fresh concern around the world, the nurse in Spain became the first person known to catch Ebola outside the outbreak zone in West Africa. In Spain, the stricken nurse had been part of a team that treated two missionaries flown home to Spain after becoming infected with Ebola in West Africa. The nurse's only symptom was a fever, but the infection was confirmed by two tests, Spanish health officials said. She was being treated in isolation, while authorities drew up a list of people she had had contact with. (AP Photo/Paul White)
Journalists work at the entrance of the Carlos III hospital in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014 where a Spanish nurse who is believed to have contracted the ebola virus from a 69-year-old Spanish priest is being treated after testing positive for the virus. Raising fresh concern around the world, the nurse in Spain became the first person known to catch Ebola outside the outbreak zone in West Africa. In Spain, the stricken nurse had been part of a team that treated two missionaries flown home to Spain after becoming infected with Ebola in West Africa. The nurse's only symptom was a fever, but the infection was confirmed by two tests, Spanish health officials said. She was being treated in isolation, while authorities drew up a list of people she had had contact with. (AP Photo/Paul White)
Hospital staff walk out past police guarding the entrance to protest outside the Carlos III hospital in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014 where a Spanish nurse who is believed to have contracted the ebola virus from a 69-year-old Spanish priest is being treated after testing positive for the virus. The staff demanded the resignation of Health Minister Ana Mato for the handling of the case. Raising fresh concern around the world, the nurse in Spain became the first person known to catch Ebola outside the outbreak zone in West Africa. In Spain, the stricken nurse had been part of a team that treated two missionaries flown home to Spain after becoming infected with Ebola in West Africa. The nurse's only symptom was a fever, but the infection was confirmed by two tests, Spanish health officials said. She was being treated in isolation, while authorities drew up a list of people she had had contact with. (AP Photo/Paul White)
A hospital staff member looks out from behind the main gate of the Carlos III hospital in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014 where a Spanish nurse who is believed to have contracted the ebola virus from a 69-year-old Spanish priest is being treated after testing positive for the virus. The hospital staff demanded the resignation of Health Minister Ana Mato for the handling of the case. Raising fresh concern around the world, the nurse in Spain became the first person known to catch Ebola outside the outbreak zone in West Africa. In Spain, the stricken nurse had been part of a team that treated two missionaries flown home to Spain after becoming infected with Ebola in West Africa. The nurse's only symptom was a fever, but the infection was confirmed by two tests, Spanish health officials said. She was being treated in isolation, while authorities drew up a list of people she had had contact with. (AP Photo/Paul White)
Hospital staff walk out past police guarding the entrance to protest outside the Carlos III hospital in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014 where a Spanish nurse who is believed to have contracted the ebola virus from a 69-year-old Spanish priest is being treated after testing positive for the virus. The staff demanded the resignation of Health Minister Ana Mato for the handling of the case. Raising fresh concern around the world, the nurse in Spain became the first person known to catch Ebola outside the outbreak zone in West Africa. In Spain, the stricken nurse had been part of a team that treated two missionaries flown home to Spain after becoming infected with Ebola in West Africa. The nurse's only symptom was a fever, but the infection was confirmed by two tests, Spanish health officials said. She was being treated in isolation, while authorities drew up a list of people she had had contact with. (AP Photo/Paul White)
MADRID, SPAIN - OCTOBER 07: Police move a supporter from the road during a demonstration asking for the resignation of Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato at the Ministry of Health headquarters on October 7, 2014 in Madrid, Spain. Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato confirmed the nurse had tested positive after treating two Ebola patients that had recently returned from Africa. (Photo by Gonzalo Arroyo Moreno/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - OCTOBER 07: Women protest during a demonstration asking for the resignation of Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato at the Ministry of Health headquarters on October 7, 2014 in Madrid, Spain. Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato confirmed the nurse had tested positive after treating two Ebola patients that had recently returned from Africa. (Photo by Gonzalo Arroyo Moreno/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - OCTOBER 07: A woman supporting public healthcare shouts during a demonstration asking for the resignation of Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato at the Ministry of Health headquarters on October 7, 2014 in Madrid, Spain. Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato confirmed the nurse had tested positive after treating two Ebola patients that had recently returned from Africa. (Photo by Gonzalo Arroyo Moreno/Getty Images)
ALCORCON, SPAIN - OCTOBER 07: A Spanish nurse infected with Ebola is moved to Carlos III Hospital from Alcorcon Hospital on October 7, 2014 in Alcorcon, Spain. Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato confirmed the nurse had tested positive after treating two Ebola patients that had been brought back to the country from Africa. (Photo by Gonzalo Arroyo Moreno/Getty Images)
ALCORCON, SPAIN - OCTOBER 07: Police escort an ambulance that carries the Spanish nurse infected by Ebola to Carlos III Hospital from Alcorcon Hospital on October 7, 2014 in Alcorcon, Spain. Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato confirmed the nurse had tested positive after treating two Ebola patients that had been brought back to the country from Africa. (Photo by Gonzalo Arroyo Moreno/Getty Images)
ALCORCON, SPAIN - OCTOBER 07: A woman puts on protective gloves and mask before she enters Hospital Fundacion Alcorcon where a Spanish nurse tested positive for the Ebola virus on October 7, 2014 in Alcorcon, near Madrid, Spain. Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato confirmed the nurse had tested positive after treating two Ebola patients that had been brought back to the country from Africa. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)
ALCORCON, SPAIN - OCTOBER 07: A woman wears protective mask as she leaves Hospital Fundacion Alcorcon where a Spanish nurse tested positive for the Ebola virus on October 7, 2014 in Alcorcon, near Madrid, Spain. Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato confirmed the nurse had tested positive after treating two Ebola patients that had been brought back to the country from Africa. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)
ALCORCON, SPAIN - OCTOBER 07: A woman and girl wear protective mask before they enter Hospital Fundacion Alcorcon where a Spanish nurse tested positive for the Ebola virus on October 7, 2014 in Alcorcon, near Madrid, Spain. Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato confirmed the nurse had tested positive after treating two Ebola patients that had been brought back to the country from Africa. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)
ALCORCON, SPAIN - OCTOBER 07: A nurse talks to the press outside Hospital Fundacion Alcorcon where a Spanish nurse tested positive for the Ebola virus on October 7, 2014 in Alcorcon, near Madrid, Spain. Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato confirmed the nurse had tested positive after treating two Ebola patients that had been brought back to the country from Africa. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)
ALCORCON, SPAIN - OCTOBER 08: The Spanish nurse infected by Ebola is moved by ambulance to Carlos III Hospital from Alcorcon Hospital on October 8, 2014 in Alcorcon, Spain. Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato confirmed the nurse had tested positive after treating two Ebola patients that had been brought back to the country from Africa. (Photo by Gonzalo Arroyo Moreno/Getty Images)
Ambulances and medical workers stand near an airplane carrying an Norwegian woman infected with the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone, after her arrival at the Oslo airport Gardermoen on October 7, 2014. AFP PHOTO / STIAN LYSBERG SOLUM / NTB scanpix / NORWAY OUT (Photo credit should read STIAN LYSBERG SOLUM/AFP/Getty Images)
WUERZBURG, GERMANY - OCTOBER 07: A volunteer doctor who will travel to West Africa to help care for Ebola patients prepares his safety glasses during training offered by the German Red Cross (DRK) on October 7, 2014 in Wuerzburg, Germany. Over 1,200 people across Germany have responded to a DRK call for volunteers, while the German armed forces, the Bundeswehr, has also asked for volunteers from its own ranks. Countries around the world are taking increasing precautions and committing resources in the battle against the deadly virus as the number of victims continues to climb. (Photo Timm Schamberger/Getty Images)
WUERZBURG, GERMANY - OCTOBER 07: A volunteer doctor who will travel to West Africa to help care for Ebola patients is disinfectet during training offered by the German Red Cross (DRK) on October 7, 2014 in Wuerzburg, Germany. Over 1,200 people across Germany have responded to a DRK call for volunteers, while the German armed forces, the Bundeswehr, has also asked for volunteers from its own ranks. Countries around the world are taking increasing precautions and committing resources in the battle against the deadly virus as the number of victims continues to climb. (Photo Timm Schamberger/Getty Images)
WUERZBURG, GERMANY - OCTOBER 07: A volunteer doctor who will travel to West Africa to help care for Ebola patients takes a smear from an actor during training offered by the German Red Cross (DRK) on October 7, 2014 in Wuerzburg, Germany. Over 1,200 people across Germany have responded to a DRK call for volunteers, while the German armed forces, the Bundeswehr, has also asked for volunteers from its own ranks. Countries around the world are taking increasing precautions and committing resources in the battle against the deadly virus as the number of victims continues to climb. (Photo Timm Schamberger/Getty Images)
WUERZBURG, GERMANY - OCTOBER 07: Rubber boots are pictured during training offered by the German Red Cross (DRK) on October 7, 2014 in Wuerzburg, Germany for volunteer doctors who will travel to West Africa to help care for Ebola patients. Over 1,200 people across Germany have responded to a DRK call for volunteers, while the German armed forces, the Bundeswehr, has also asked for volunteers from its own ranks. Countries around the world are taking increasing precautions and committing resources in the battle against the deadly virus as the number of victims continues to climb. (Photo Timm Schamberger/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - OCTOBER 07: Nurses' union leader Juan Jose Cano talks to the press outside Carlos III hospital where a nurse is being treated after testing positive for the virus Ebola on October 7, 2014 in Madrid, Spain. Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato confirmed the nurse had tested positive after treating two Ebola patients that had been brought back to the country from Africa. (Photo by Denis Doyle/Getty Images)
ALCORCON, SPAIN - OCTOBER 07: A Spanish nurse infected with Ebola is moved to Carlos III Hospital from Alcorcon Hospital on October 7, 2014 in Alcorcon, Spain. Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato confirmed the nurse had tested positive after treating two Ebola patients that had been brought back to the country from Africa. (Photo by Gonzalo Arroyo Moreno/Getty Images)
Cans of disinfectant are displayed during a course to learn how to transport and handle contagious patients use an 'Aircraft Transit Isolator' (ATI) at the military airport of Pratica di Mare, 30 kilometers south of Rome, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. Italy's defense ministry staged the simulated medical evacuation of an Ebola patient Wednesday as part of a three-day training course for Italian military, Red Cross and health care workers. Some of them are on the front lines of Italy's Mare Nostrum rescue operation for thousands of African migrants who are arriving here every day in smugglers' boats. Officials and medical experts insist that the risk that Ebola might spread from Africa to Europe is small. They say Italy's first case of Ebola will most likely be from an Italian doctor or missionary who contracts it while caring for patients in Liberia, Sierra Leone or Guinea _ the three hardest-hit countries _ and is airlifted home. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)
Participants into a course to learn how to transport and handle contagious patients use an 'Aircraft Transit Isolator' (ATI) to carry a colleague during a simulation at the military airport of Pratica di Mare, 30 kilometers south of Rome, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. Italy's defense ministry staged the simulated medical evacuation of an Ebola patient Wednesday as part of a three-day training course for Italian military, Red Cross and health care workers. Some of them are on the front lines of Italy's Mare Nostrum rescue operation for thousands of African migrants who are arriving here every day in smugglers' boats. Officials and medical experts insist that the risk that Ebola might spread from Africa to Europe is small. They say Italy's first case of Ebola will most likely be from an Italian doctor or missionary who contracts it while caring for patients in Liberia, Sierra Leone or Guinea _ the three hardest-hit countries _ and is airlifted home. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)
Participants into a course to learn how to transport and handle contagious patients use an 'Aircraft Transit Isolator' (ATI) to carry a colleague during a simulation at the military airport of Pratica di Mare, 30 kilometers south of Rome, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. Italy's defense ministry staged the simulated medical evacuation of an Ebola patient Wednesday as part of a three-day training course for Italian military, Red Cross and health care workers. Some of them are on the front lines of Italy's Mare Nostrum rescue operation for thousands of African migrants who are arriving here every day in smugglers' boats. Officials and medical experts insist that the risk that Ebola might spread from Africa to Europe is small. They say Italy's first case of Ebola will most likely be from an Italian doctor or missionary who contracts it while caring for patients in Liberia, Sierra Leone or Guinea _ the three hardest-hit countries _ and is airlifted home. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)
Participants into a course to learn how to transport and handle contagious patients use an 'Aircraft Transit Isolator' (ATI) to carry a colleague during a simulation at the military airport of Pratica di Mare, 30 kilometers south of Rome, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. Italy's defense ministry staged the simulated medical evacuation of an Ebola patient Wednesday as part of a three-day training course for Italian military, Red Cross and health care workers. Some of them are on the front lines of Italy's Mare Nostrum rescue operation for thousands of African migrants who are arriving here every day in smugglers' boats. Officials and medical experts insist that the risk that Ebola might spread from Africa to Europe is small. They say Italy's first case of Ebola will most likely be from an Italian doctor or missionary who contracts it while caring for patients in Liberia, Sierra Leone or Guinea _ the three hardest-hit countries _ and is airlifted home. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)
Participants into a course to learn how to transport and handle contagious patients use an 'Aircraft Transit Isolator' (ATI) to carry a colleague during a simulation at the military airport of Pratica di Mare, 30 kilometers south of Rome, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. Italy's defense ministry staged the simulated medical evacuation of an Ebola patient Wednesday as part of a three-day training course for Italian military, Red Cross and health care workers. Some of them are on the front lines of Italy's Mare Nostrum rescue operation for thousands of African migrants who are arriving here every day in smugglers' boats. Officials and medical experts insist that the risk that Ebola might spread from Africa to Europe is small. They say Italy's first case of Ebola will most likely be from an Italian doctor or missionary who contracts it while caring for patients in Liberia, Sierra Leone or Guinea _ the three hardest-hit countries _ and is airlifted home. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)
MADRID, SPAIN - OCTOBER 07: Police stand outside a block of apartments where a Spanish nurse who tested positive for the Ebola virus lives. Her dog is thought to be at risk of being put down as health officials try to keep the virus from spreading, on October 7, 2014 in Alcorcon, near Madrid, Spain. Spanish Health Minister Ana Mato confirmed the nurse had tested positive after treating two Ebola patients that had recently returned from Africa. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)
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MADRID (AP) - Health officials in Spain rushed to contain the Ebola virus Tuesday after it got past Europe's defenses, quarantining four people at a Madrid hospital where a nursing assistant got infected and persuading a court that the woman's dog must die.

The first case of Ebola transmitted outside Africa, where a months-long outbreak has killed more than 3,400 people, is raising questions about how prepared wealthier countries really are. Health workers complained Tuesday that they lack the training and equipment to handle the virus, and the all-important tourism industry was showing its anxiety.

Medical officials in the United States, meanwhile, are retraining hospital staff and fine-tuning infection control procedures after the mishandling of a critically ill Liberian man in Texas, who might have exposed many others to the virus after being sent away by a hospital.

In Africa, the U.S. military was preparing to open a 25-bed mobile hospital catering to health care workers with Ebola, before building a total of 17 promised 100-bed Ebola Treatment Units in Liberia. The virus has taken an especially devastating toll on health care workers, sickening or killing more than 370 in the hardest-hit countries of Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, where doctors and nurses were already in short supply.

And as the disease moved from a seemingly distant continent to the doorsteps of the world's largest economies, government leaders faced growing pressure to ramp up responses. Spanish opposition parties called for the resignation of Health Minister Ana Mato, and the European Union demanded answers to what went wrong.

Obama administration spokesman Josh Earnest said Tuesday that more passenger screening measures would be announced "in the next couple of days," even though the White House remains "confident in the screening measures that are currently in place."

The nursing assistant in Madrid was part of a special team caring for a Spanish priest who died of Ebola last month after being evacuated from Sierra Leone. The nursing assistant wore a hazmat suit both times she entered his room, officials said, and no records point to any accidental exposure to the virus, which spreads through direct contact with the bodily fluids of a sickened person.

The woman, who had been on vacation in the Madrid area after treating the priest, was diagnosed with Ebola on Monday after coming down with a fever, and was said to be stable Tuesday. Her husband also was isolated as a precaution. Another quarantined nurse tested negative, but a man who traveled in Nigeria remained in isolation.

Madrid's regional government even got a court order to euthanize and incinerate the couple's mixed-breed dog, Excalibur, against their objections, without even testing the animal. A government statement said "available scientific information" doesn't guarantee that infected dogs can't transmit the virus to humans.

Some reports in medical journals suggest that dogs can be infected with Ebola without showing symptoms, but whether they can spread the disease to people is unclear.

Ebola's source in nature hasn't been pinpointed. The leading suspect is a certain type of fruit bat, but the World Health Organization lists chimpanzees, gorillas, monkeys, forest antelope and porcupines as possibly playing a role in spread of the disease. Even pigs may amplify infection because of bats on farms in Africa.

Spanish authorities also were tracking down all the woman's contacts, and put more than 50 other people under observation, including her relatives and fellow health care workers. "The priority now is to establish that there is no risk to anybody else," emergency coordinator Fernando Simon said.

Even so, the potential repercussions of Ebola's presence in Europe became clear, as shares of Spanish airline and hotel chain companies slumped in Tuesday's trading. Spain is Europe's biggest vacation destination after France, and investors were apparently spooked that the deadly virus could scare away travelers.

The afflicted woman, reportedly in her 40s and childless, was not identified to protect her privacy, but nursing union officials she had 14 years' experience. Spanish officials said she had changed a diaper for the priest and collected material from his room after he died.

Dead Ebola victims are highly infectious, and in West Africa their bodies are collected by workers in hazmat outfits.

The Madrid infection shows that even in countries with sophisticated medical procedures, frontline health care workers are at risk while caring for Ebola patients. Some two dozen health workers protested outside a Madrid hospital Tuesday, where union representative Esther Quinones complained that they lack resources and training.

In the United States, health care providers are implementing many precautions - reviewing triage procedures, creating isolation units, and even sending actors with mock symptoms into New York City's public hospital emergency rooms to test reactions.

"You never know when (an Ebola) patient's going to walk in," said Dr. Debra Spicehandler, an infectious disease expert at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, New York. "Education is key to controlling this - education of the public and of health care workers."

CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said Tuesday that infectins of health-care workers tend to happen when a medical team is dealing with Ebola for the first time, or a team is overburdened and losing its ability to focus on containment. For this reason, the CDC advises six-week limits on the tours of medical workers in outbreak areas.

Frieden said the agency is continuing to discuss increased screening of travelers from West Africa, and noted that the agency is already screening people as they leave the region. Of 36,000 people who answered questionnaires and had their temperatures checked, only 77 travelers were halted, and none ended up having Ebola, he said.

56 Being Checked for Ebola in Spain


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