Qantas puts world's largest plane on longest route

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Qantas puts world's largest plane on longest route
The front section of a Qantas Airline Airbus A380 is displayed following an announcement at a joint press conference between officials representing Australia's New South Wales state and Qantas Airline at Sydney Airport on April 22, 2013. Qantas and the NSW government announced a new 30 million AUD (30.8 million USD) partnership to promote Sydney and regional NSW to the world, marking the largest tourism and major events marketing partnership in the state's history. AFP PHOTO / Greg WOOD (Photo credit should read GREG WOOD/AFP/Getty Images)
An Airbus SAS A380 aircraft operated by Qantas Airways Ltd. takes off at Sydney Airport in Sydney, Australia, on Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Qantas, Australia's largest carrier, is scheduled to report full-year results on Aug. 28. Photographer: Brendon Thorne/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An Airbus SAS A380 aircraft operated by Qantas Airways Ltd. takes off at Sydney Airport in Sydney, Australia, on Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Qantas, Australia's largest carrier, is scheduled to report full-year results on Aug. 28. Photographer: Brendon Thorne/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The tail of a Qantas Airline Airbus A380 is displayed during a joint press conference between officials representing Australia's New South Wales state and Qantas Airline at Sydney Airport on April 22, 2013. Qantas and the NSW government announced a new 30 million AUD (30.8 million USD) partnership to promote Sydney and regional NSW to the world, marking the largest tourism and major events marketing partnership in the state's history. AFP PHOTO / Greg WOOD (Photo credit should read GREG WOOD/AFP/Getty Images)
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - MARCH 31: (NO SALES, NO ADVERTISING) In this handout image provided by Qantas, A Qantas Airbus A380 and Emirates Airbus A380 fly over Sydney Harbour on March 31, 2013 in Sydney, Australia. The two Airbus A380s display is believed to be the first of its kind between two seperate airlines to fly over Sydney's Harbour which will mark the alliance between the two airlines. (Photo by James Morgan/Qantas via Getty Images)
A Qantas A-380 Airbus flies low over Sydney's CBD on March 11, 2013, as a mark of respect for former Qantas CEO James Strong who died last week aged 68. A prominent Australian businessman, Strong was also the chairman of the organising committee for the 2015 cricket World Cup in Australia and New Zealand. AFP PHOTO/William WEST (Photo credit should read WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)
(FILES) This file picture taken on August 11, 2011 shows a Qantas A380 Airbus on the tarmac at Tullamarine Airport in Melbourne, Australia. Qantas removed one of its Airbus A380 superjumbos from service on February 8, 2012 after discovering 'minor cracks' in its wings, but said that there was no risk to flight safety. AFP PHOTO / FILES / William WEST (Photo credit should read WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)
A reflection of the tail of the Qantas Airbus A380 plane parked on Singapore's Changi International Airport's air site is seen in a rain puddle on Saturday, April 21, 2012 in Singapore during a media preview. The newly repaired plane "Nancy Bird Walton" which was forced to make an emergency landing shortly after take off on Nov. 4, 2010 at the airport with 459 people on board after one of its four engines shut down blasting shrapnel holes in the superjumbo jet's wing, was ready to be back in service Saturday. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)
A Qantas Airbus A380 lands at Sydney Airport in Australia, Sunday, Sept. 21, 2008, two years behind schedule. Qantas said the Airbus, which has a 525-seat capacity but which Qantas has configured to carry 450 passengers, will make its inaugural commercial flight from Melbourne, Australia, to Los Angeles on Oct. 20. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)
View of the first class suite designed by Australian designer Marc Newson, inside the first A380 delivered to Qantas, during the delivery ceremony at the Airbus factory in Toulouse, southwestern France, Friday, Sept. 19, 2008. Airbus will meet its target of delivering 12 A380 super jumbo aircraft this year, the company's CEO pledged Friday, brushing aside recurring speculation that manufacturing and engineering difficulties had again put the project behind schedule. (AP Photo/Manuel Blondeau)
View of the first class suite designed by Australian designer Marc Newson, inside the first A380 delivered to Qantas, during the delivery ceremony at the Airbus factory in Toulouse, southwestern France, Friday, Sept. 19, 2008. Airbus will meet its target of delivering 12 A380 super jumbo aircraft this year, the company's CEO pledged Friday, brushing aside recurring speculation that manufacturing and engineering difficulties had again put the project behind schedule. (AP Photo/Manuel Blondeau)
An Airbus A380, the world's largest passenger jet, operated by Australian airline Qantas, prepares to touch down at Los Angeles International Airport Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2007. The visit is being conducted by Airbus, Qantas Airlines and Los Angeles World Airports to test airport function and compatibility in anticipation of Qantas' A380 passenger service at LAX, which is scheduled to begin in the Fall 2008. (AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian)
Qantas Chief Executive Geoff Dixon, center, tours Qantas' first Airbus A380 during the plane's delivery ceremony to Qantas at the Airbus factory in Toulouse, southwestern France, Friday, Sept. 19, 2008. Airbus will meet its target of delivering 12 A380 super jumbo aircraft this year, the company's CEO pledged Friday, brushing aside recurring speculation that manufacturing and engineering difficulties had again put the project behind schedule. (AP Photo/Manuel Blondeau)
A stewardess shows the electronic remote control of the 17 inches LCD screen in the first class of Qantas' first Airbus A380, at Airbus' delivery center during the delivery ceremony at the Airbus factory in Toulouse, southwestern France, Friday, Sept. 19, 2008. Airbus will meet its target of delivering 12 A380 super jumbo aircraft this year, the company's CEO pledged Friday, brushing aside recurring speculation that manufacturing and engineering difficulties had again put the project behind schedule. (AP Photo/Manuel Blondeau)
Australian designer Marc Newson poses inside the Airbus A380 he decorated for Qantas, during the delivery ceremony of the first Airbus A380 to Qantas Airlines, at the Airbus factory in Toulouse, southwestern France, Friday, Sept. 19, 2008. (AP Photo/Manuel Blondeau)
Qantas' first Airbus A380 is seen parked outside Airbus' delivery center during the delivery ceremony at the Airbus factory in Toulouse, southwestern France, Friday, Sept. 19, 2008. Airbus will meet its target of delivering 12 A380 super jumbo aircraft this year, the company's CEO pledged Friday, brushing aside recurring speculation that manufacturing and engineering difficulties had again put the project behind schedule. (AP Photo/Manuel Blondeau)
Qantas jets taxi at the international airport in Sydney, Australia, Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2011. Qantas Airways Ltd. said Tuesday it plans to cut up to 1,000 jobs as part of a major shakeup of its international business that will include the launch of a new Asia-based airline. The flagship Australian carrier, which is struggling to offset losses from its international operations, will buy between 106 and 110 Airbus A320 aircraft, and retire older planes as part of the five-year plan. It will also defer the delivery of six Airbus A380 superjumbo planes for up to six years.(AP Photo/Rob Griffith)
A Qantas Airbus A380 jet dubbed 'Nancy Bird Walton', in honour of Australia's first female commercial pilot, sits on the tarmac following repairs at the Changi International Airport in Singapore on April 21, 2012. A Qantas Airbus A380 jet that dramatically lost an engine in a mid-air blast off Singapore in November 2010 was formally handed back to the Australian flag carrier April 21 after extensive repairs. AFP PHOTO/ROSLAN RAHMAN (Photo credit should read ROSLAN RAHMAN/AFP/Getty Images)
A Qantas A380 Airbus sits on the tarmac at Melbourne's Tullamarine Airport on August 11, 2011. AFP PHOTO / William WEST (Photo credit should read WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 27: The Qantas Airbus A380 takes off on its first trip since a mid-air engine explosion three weeks go on November 27, 2010 in Sydney, Australia. Qantas A380 flight 31 from Sydney will head to Singapore before flying to London. (Photo by Don Arnold/Getty Images)
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 27: The Qantas Airbus A380 makes its first flight since a mid-air engine explosion three weeks go on November 27, 2010 in Sydney, Australia. Qantas A380 flight 31 from Sydney will head to Singapore before flying to London. (Photo by Don Arnold/Getty Images)
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FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) - Qantas is putting the world's biggest passenger plane on the world's longest airline route.

A Qantas Airbus A380 touched down Monday at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport about 15 hours after leaving Sydney, Australia, on the 8,578-mile journey.

The double-deck, four-engine jet was greeted with a water-cannon salute, then taxied to a two-story gate that was configured just for the behemoth.

The inaugural flight carried a full load of 484 passengers, according to a Qantas spokesman.

DFW is a large airport with connecting flights throughout the U.S. and Latin America, making it ideal for the plane and the route. But the A380's size also limits its appeal. Smaller planes such as Boeing's latest, the 787, are more economical on many routes.

Qantas previously flew the Sydney-Dallas route with the Boeing 747, which required a stopover in Brisbane, Australia.

"The 747 served us really well, but it doesn't have the range of the A380," said Qantas Senior Executive Vice President Vanessa Hudson. "The A380 is much bigger, so we can actually now provide 10 percent additional capacity."

For travelers wishing to fly the new route, it won't be cheap. Hudson said tickets are roughly $1,900 in economy; double that for the roomier seats in premium economy; $7,000 for business class; and $12,000 to $13,000 for first class, where the airline tosses in a set of pajamas and a sheepskin mattress.

The special A380 gate at DFW will be used again on Wednesday, when Gulf airline Emirates begins flying the huge plane between Dallas and Dubai.

World's Longest Flight On World's Largest Plane
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