New website propels validation on social media

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Website Gives Second Life to Terrible Instagram Pics

If you're on social media, you'd be lying if you said you didn't get a kick out your "friends" and "followers" liking the content you posted.

Whether it's a "thumbs up" on Facebook, a retweet on Twitter or a "heart" of approval on Instagram – users feel a sense of validation upon getting these notifications.

In a world where the online experience seems to trump real life, getting the approval of both friends and complete strangers has become standard procedure in today's culture.

No likes yet
See Gallery
New website propels validation on social media

So much so, a new site is capitalizing on the trend, specifically on Instagram, offering to give a second chance to the forgotten photos which for whatever reason, never got "liked."

"It's sort of doing some good for the world," Tal Midyan, one of the's developers told PIX11 News. "Like today [people] are like 'I'm here right now, I'm eating this, I'm at this show, I'm at this restaurant with this person and if I take a photo of it, will people respond well to it?'"

"Sometimes if they don't get that 'like' they'll get depressed," Midyan said.

Daniel Sumarna, another developer, acknowledged that the idea of seeking abstract validation does sound silly, but the reality is – it's a sign of the times.

"Yea it's embarrassing that we don't get 'likes' but it's even more embarrassing that we care so much," Sumarna told PIX11.

For those who do care, the site's programmer Tim Hettler gives a little insight as to what some users are doing wrong on the 'Gram which is resulting in no "likes."

"A very common thread was [using] no filter," Hettler said. "On Instagram, you're supposed to use filters because they make the photos look more interesting and they're there for a reason."

While you can't deny that strikes a chord with a generation, some are not quite sold.

"I don't need a 'heart,' I can get the heart in real-life," Instagram user Karen Schalluer said, referring to Instagram's "like" icon.

How enlightening Karen. Mind, blown.

More to watch on
Will Smartphone encryption hamper law enforcement?
Paula Deen offers public apology
Woman breaks windshield to save baby

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

People are Reading