Cameron: Queen 'purred' after Scottish vote

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Cameron: Queen 'purred' after Scottish vote
British Prime Minister David Cameron leaves after giving a statement to the media about Scotland's referendum results, outside his official residence at 10 Downing Street in central London, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Scottish voters have rejected independence, deciding to remain part of the United Kingdom after a historic referendum that shook the country to its core. The decision prevented a rupture of a 307-year union with England, bringing a huge sigh of relief to the British political establishment. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Britain's Home Secretary Theresa May arrives at British Prime Minister David Cameron's official residence at 10 Downing Street in central London, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. Polls have opened across Scotland in a referendum that will decide whether the country leaves its 307-year-old union with England and becomes an independent state. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
A pedestrian shelters from the rain beneath an umbrella as she walks near the Scottish parliament building in Edinburgh, U.K., on Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014. Prime Minister David Cameron vowed to give English lawmakers more say on laws that only affect England after Scots rejected independence, a plan that may hit the opposition Labour Party's chances of forming a functioning government. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Pedestrians pass each other as they cross an intersection on Princes Street in Edinburgh, U.K., on Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014. Prime Minister David Cameron vowed to give English lawmakers more say on laws that only affect England after Scots rejected independence, a plan that may hit the opposition Labour Party's chances of forming a functioning government. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Shoppers pass along Princes Street in Edinburgh, U.K., on Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014. Prime Minister David Cameron vowed to give English lawmakers more say on laws that only affect England after Scots rejected independence yesterday, a plan that may hit the opposition Labour Party's chances of forming a functioning government. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Republican writing supporting the Yes vote in the Scottish Refrendum is seen on a mountain in West Belfast, Northern Ireland, Monday, Sept. 8, 2014. Scotland is due to vote on September 18th in a referendum on Scottish independence and many people in Northern Ireland will be watching closely on its outcome. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
In this photo taken March 15, 2014 a man carries a placard during a pro-independence march in Edinburgh, Scotland for the upcoming vote on Scotland's independence from the United Kingdom. Scotland's swithering "middle million" has Britain's future in its hands. "Swithering" means wavering, and it's a word you hear a lot in Scotland right now. Six months from Tuesday, Scottish voters must decide whether their country should become independent, breaking up Great Britain as it has existed for 300 years. Faced with the historic choice, many find their hearts say "aye" but their heads say "why risk it?" Polls suggest as many as a quarter of Scotland's 4 million voters remain undecided, and their choice will determine the outcome. Many long to cut the tie binding them to England, but fear the risks _ and the financial fallout. (AP Photo/Jill Lawless)
A "Scotland welcomes you" sign stands beside a road near Gretna, Scotland, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. If Scottish-based voters approve separation from the U.K. on Thursday, officials from Scotland and Britain will have to sort out assets and debt, questions over continued membership in the United Nations and European Union, and whether to retain a common currency. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
A Scottish Saltire flag, second left, flies alongside the other flags of the countries in the U.K. next to "The Auld Acquaintance" cairn, which is being built as a monument supporting the union of Scotland and the U.K., on the England Scotland border near Gretna, Scotland, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. The stone circle is being built as a mass participation project as a monument to togetherness, open to anyone who wishes to place a stone there, decorated or otherwise. If Scottish-based voters approve separation from the U.K. on Thursday, officials from Scotland and Britain will have to sort out assets and debt, questions over continued membership in the United Nations and European Union, and whether to retain a common currency. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
Stones, some decorated, form "The Auld Acquaintance" cairn, which is being built as a monument supporting the union of Scotland and the U.K. on the England Scotland border near Gretna, Scotland, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. The stone circle is being built as a mass participation project as a monument to togetherness, open to anyone who wishes to place a stone there, decorated or otherwise. If Scottish-based voters approve separation from the U.K. on Thursday, officials from Scotland and Britain will have to sort out assets and debt, questions over continued membership in the United Nations and European Union, and whether to retain a common currency. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
A Yes sign is displayed in a field with Llamas grazing in Jedburgh, Scotland, Monday, Sept. 8, 2014. The British government plans to offer Scotland more financial autonomy in the coming days as polls predict a very close vote in the September 18 referendum on Scottish independence. (AP Photo/Scott Heppell)
From left, the Union Jack, St George's Cross and the Saltire fly at Adderstone, England, Monday, Sept. 8, 2014. The British government plans to offer Scotland more financial autonomy in the coming days as polls predict a very close vote in the September 18 on Scottish independence. (AP Photo/Scott Heppell)
In this photo taken March 15, 2014 cards hang in shop in Edinburgh with -yes, no and maybe- for the upcoming vote on Scotland's independence from the United Kingdom. Scotland's swithering "middle million" has Britain's future in its hands. "Swithering" means wavering, and it's a word you hear a lot in Scotland right now. Six months from Tuesday, Scottish voters must decide whether their country should become independent, breaking up Great Britain as it has existed for 300 years. Faced with the historic choice, many find their hearts say "aye" but their heads say "why risk it?" Polls suggest as many as a quarter of Scotland's 4 million voters remain undecided, and their choice will determine the outcome. Many long to cut the tie binding them to England, but fear the risks _ and the financial fallout. (AP Photo/Jill Lawless)
FILE - In this Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, file photo a Scottish flag and a Union flag fly outside a Scottish memorabilia shop in Edinburgh, Scotland. The British government plans to offer Scotland more financial autonomy in the coming days as polls predict a very close vote in the upcoming referendum on Scottish independence. Chancellor George Osborne told BBC on Sunday that the government is finalizing plans to give Scotland "much greater" fiscal and tax autonomy and will unveil the proposals in the coming days. He spoke after polls showed a tightening of the vote ahead of the landmark September 18 referendum on whether Scotland should become independent from Britain. (AP Photo/Scott Heppell, File)
In this Monday, Sept. 8, 2014, file photo Yes Signs are displayed in Eyemouth, Scotland. If Scottish voters this week say Yes to independence, not only will they tear up the map of Great Britain, they'll shake the twin pillars of Western Europe's postwar prosperity and security, the European Union and the U.S. led NATO defense alliance. (AP Photo/Scott Heppell, File)
In this photo taken March 15, 2014 a man wears a multitude of 'yes' campaign badges during a pro-independence march in Edinburgh, Scotland for the upcoming vote on Scotland's independence from the United Kingdom. Scotland's swithering "middle million" has Britain's future in its hands. "Swithering" means wavering, and it's a word you hear a lot in Scotland right now. Six months from Tuesday, Scottish voters must decide whether their country should become independent, breaking up Great Britain as it has existed for 300 years. Faced with the historic choice, many find their hearts say "aye" but their heads say "why risk it?" Polls suggest as many as a quarter of Scotland's 4 million voters remain undecided, and their choice will determine the outcome. Many long to cut the tie binding them to England, but fear the risks _ and the financial fallout. (AP Photo/Jill Lawless)
Allan Smith plays his bagpipes for the passing tourist what stop at the Scotland England border at Carter Bar, Scotland, Monday, Sept. 8, 2014.The British government plans to offer Scotland more financial autonomy in the coming days as polls predict a very close vote in the September 18 referendum on Scottish independence. (AP Photo/Scott Heppell)
A Yes sign is seen displayed in a field with Llamas grazing In Jedburgh, Scotland, Monday, Sept. 8, 2014.The British government plans to offer Scotland more financial autonomy in the coming days as polls predict a very close vote in the September 18 on Scottish independence. (AP Photo/Scott Heppell)
Republican writing supporting the Yes vote in the Scottish Referendum on a mountain in West Belfast, Northern Ireland, Monday, Sept. 8, 2014. Scotland is due to vote on September 18th in a referendum on Scottish independence and many people in Northern Ireland will be watching closely on its outcome. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
In this photo taken March 14, 2014, locals dressed as Vikings carry torches as they take part in the annual Up Helly Aa, Viking fire festival in Gulberwick, Shetland Islands north of mainland Scotland. The fearsome-looking participants in the festival live in Scotland's remote Shetland Islands, a wind-whipped northern archipelago where many claim descent from Scandinavian raiders. They are cool to the idea of Scotland leaving Britain to form an independent nation, and determined that their rugged islands will retain their autonomy whatever the outcome of September’s referendum. (AP Photo/Jill Lawless)
FILE- British author J.K. Rowling poses for photographers at the Southbank Centre in London, in this file photo dated Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012. Author of the Harry Potter series of books, J.K. Rowling is having second thoughts about the romantic content for the characters in her Potter books, in an interview published Sunday Feb. 2, 2014, Rowling reveals she chose the relationships for very personal reasons, "as a form of wish fulfillment", and having little to do with literature. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, FILE)
A display of t-shirts are seen for sale in a Scottish memorabilia shop in Edinburgh, Scotland Friday, Jan. 13, 2012. This week Scottish authorities announced they will hold a referendum on independence in 2014, firing the starting pistol on a contest that could end in the breakup of Britain. Scotland's history has been entwined with that of its more populous southern neighbor for millennia, and since 1707 Scotland and England have been part of a single country, Great Britain, sharing a monarch, a currency and a London-based government. But for centuries before that, Scotland was an independent kingdom, warding off English invaders in a series of bloody battles. Now a more peaceful modern independence movement thinks its goal of regaining that autonomy is finally in sight. (AP Photo/Scott Heppell)
JEDBURGH, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 10: A Llama stands next to a Yes campaign sign in a field on the Scottish borders on September 10, 2014 in Jedburgh, Scotland. The Scottish referendum takes place next week and will determine if Scotland is to remain part of the United Kingdom. (Photo by Ian Forsyth/Getty Images)
JEDBURGH, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 10: A Llama stands next to a Yes campaign sign in a field on the Scottish borders on September 10, 2014 in Jedburgh, Scotland. The Scottish referendum takes place next week and will determine if Scotland is to remain part of the United Kingdom. (Photo by Ian Forsyth/Getty Images)
A Yes sign is displayed in a field with Llamas grazing in Jedburgh, Scotland, Monday, Sept. 8, 2014. The British government plans to offer Scotland more financial autonomy in the coming days as polls predict a very close vote in the September 18 referendum on Scottish independence. (AP Photo/Scott Heppell)
A Scottish Saltire flag blows in the wind near the Wallace Monument, Stirling, Scotland. Thursday, Jan. 12 2012. The monument commemorates Sir William Wallace who defeated the English Army in1297. This week the Scottish Government has announced that they wish to hold an independence referendum in 2014. (AP Photo/Chris Clark)
EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 17: Cuckoo's Bakery reveal the result of the cupcakes referendum that the bakery has been holding since March 7 by selling Yes, No and undecided cupcakes at Cuckoo's Bakery in Dundas Street, on September 17, 2014 in Edinburgh, Scotland. In the informal poll 47.7% bought No cupcakes, 43.5% bought Yes and a further 8.8% bought undecided decorated cakes. The referendum debate has entered its final day of campaigning as the Scottish people prepare to go to the polls tomorrow to decide whether or not Scotland should have independence and break away from the United Kingdom. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 17: Cuckoo's Bakery waitress Pippa Perriam reveals the result of the cupcakes referendum that the bakery has been holding since March 7 by selling Yes, No and undecided cupcakes at Cuckoo's Bakery in Dundas Street, on September 17, 2014 in Edinburgh, Scotland. In the informal poll 47.7% bought No cupcakes, 43.5% bought Yes and a further 8.8% bought undecided decorated cakes. The referendum debate has entered its final day of campaigning as the Scottish people prepare to go to the polls tomorrow to decide whether or not Scotland should have independence and break away from the United Kingdom. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
GRETNA GREEN, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 16: The sun sets behind the Union flag (C), the flag of England (L) and the Scottish Saltire (R) on September 16, 2014 in Gretna Green, Scotland. Yes and No supporters are campaigning in the last two days of the referendum to decide if Scotland will become an indpendent country. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
GLASGOW, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 16: Hundreds of Yes supporters gather in George Square to show their support for the independence referendum on September 16, 2014 in Glasgow, Scotland. With just two days of campaigning left before polling stations open and voters across the country will hold Scotlands future in their hands. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
A pedestrian passes a vandalized pro-independence 'yes' campaign billboard advertisement in Edinburgh, U.K., on Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The impact of Scotland's referendum debate has been felt more in the currency market with the pound tumbling and volatility surging on Sept. 8 after a YouGov Plc poll showed the nationalists overtook opponents of independence. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
GLASGOW, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 16: A Scottish woman puts a chocolate marshmallow on a sentence reflecting her opinion upon a paper at Referendum Cafe opening for demonstrating Scottish people's choices and opinions regarding referendum on Scotland's independence in Glasgow, Scotland on September 16, 2014. Scottish people demonstrate their choices on referendum on Scotland's independence, will be held on September 18, with placards, banners, brochures and posters. (Photo by Yunus Kaymaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Scotland's Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon poses for pictures as she eats a 'Yes cupcake' during a visit to a carer's meeting in Renfrew in Scotland, on September 16, 2014, ahead of the referendum on Scotland's independence. The leaders of the three main British parties on Tuesday issued a joint pledge to give the Scottish parliament more powers if voters reject independence, in a final drive to stop the United Kingdom splitting. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
'Yes' cakes are displayed on a tray ahead of a visit by Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon in Renfrew, Scotland on September 16, 2014, ahead of the referendum on Scotland's independence. The leaders of the three main British parties on Tuesday issued a joint pledge to give the Scottish parliament more powers if voters reject independence, in a final drive to stop the United Kingdom splitting. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 15: People listen as Sir Bob Geldof speaks to members of the public and supporters of the 'Better Together' campaign from a raised stage in Trafalgar Square on September 15, 2014 in London, England. The latest polls in Scotland's independence referendum put the No campaign back in the lead, the first time they have gained ground on the Yes campaign since the start of August. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 15: People listen as Sir Bob Geldof speaks to members of the public and supporters of the 'Better Together' campaign from a raised stage in Trafalgar Square on September 15, 2014 in London, England. The latest polls in Scotland's independence referendum put the No campaign back in the lead, the first time they have gained ground on the Yes campaign since the start of August. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 15: Sir Bob Geldof speaks (centre) to members of the public and supporters of the 'Better Together' campaign from a raised stage in Trafalgar Square on September 15, 2014 in London, England. The latest polls in Scotland's independence referendum put the No campaign back in the lead, the first time they have gained ground on the Yes campaign since the start of August. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
CARTER BAR, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 14: A cairn with 'Scotland' painted on it greets visitors at the border with England on September 14, 2014 in Carter Bar, Scotland. The latest polls in Scotland's independence referendum put the No campaign back in the lead, the first time they have gained ground on the Yes campaign since the start of August. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
A Pro-independence 'Yes' campaigner displays his tattoos as he joins a march to the BBC Scotland Headquarters in Glasgow on September 14, 2014 to protest against alleged biased by the BBC in its coverage of the Scottish referendum. Campaigners for and against Scottish independence scrambled for votes ahead of a historic referendum, as a religious leader prayed for harmony after polls showed Scots were almost evenly split. AFP PHOTO/ANDY BUCHANAN (Photo credit should read Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images)
EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 13: Members of the public watch Orangemen and women march during a pro union parade, less than a week before voters go to the polls in a yes or no referendum on whether Scotland should become and independent country on September 13, 2014 in Edinburgh, Scotland. An estimated 10,000 people have taken part in a Grand Orange Lodge of Scotland procession in support of the Union this morning. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND - SEPTEMBER 11: Cup cakes showing, yes, no and undecided are displayed in Cuckoo's Bakery on Dundas Street on September 11, 2014 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Voters will go to the polls a week today to decide whether Scotland should become an independent country and leave the United Kingdom. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
A YES campaign Statue of Liberty on display in Niddrie a suburb of Edinburgh, Scotland, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The two sides in Scotland's independence debate scrambled Tuesday to convert undecided voters, with just two days to go until a referendum on separation. The pitch of the debate has grown increasingly urgent. Anti-independence campaigners argue that separation could send the economy into a tailspin, while the Yes side accuses its foes of scaremongering. (AP Photo/David Cheskin)
Jockey Carol Batley, representing the 'No' vote, (L) and jockey Rachael Grant, representing the 'Yes' vote, prepare to take part in a 'Referendum Race' sponsored by the bookmakers Ladbrokes at Musselburgh racecourse in Edinburgh, Scotland, on September 15, 2014, ahead of the referendum on Scotland's independence. British Prime Minister David Cameron on Monday was to plead with Scots to vote against independence in a referendum as Scotland enters the most decisive week in its modern history. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
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LONDON (AP) - Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron has been overheard describing his nervousness about the Scotland referendum and how Queen Elizabeth II appeared relieved when he called to tell her the result.

The leader was being filmed chatting with former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg in New York when microphones picked up what they said. The video showing the conversation was broadcast Tuesday on Sky News.

Cameron was heard describing how the queen "purred down the line" after he called to tell her "it's all right, it's OK" after Thursday's referendum, in which Scots rejected independence and chose to stay with the United Kingdom.

"It should never have been that close. It wasn't in the end," he told Bloomberg. "I've said I want to find these polling companies and I want to sue them for my stomach ulcers because of what they put me through, you know. It was very nervous."

A spokesman from Buckingham Palace said it never comments on exchanges between the prime minister and the queen.

The queen is prohibited from taking sides in political debates and rarely makes her personal views public. For that reason, she surprised many when she told well-wishers before the referendum that Scots should think "very carefully about the future" before voting.

Following the vote, the monarch said in a statement "all of us throughout the United Kingdom will respect" the poll's result, and that mutual understanding will overcome the "strong feelings and contrasting emotions" during the Scottish debate.

The Queen throughout the years
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The Queen
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Cameron: Queen 'purred' after Scottish vote
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, back left, smiles as she watches the swimming at the Tollcross International Swimming Centre during the Commonwealth Games 2014 in Glasgow, Scotland, Thursday July 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, left, presents the honour of Knight of the Order of Australia to Australian Governor-General Peter Cosgrove, in Balmoral, Scotland, Tuesday Aug. 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Andrew Milligan, Pool)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II at the opening ceremony of the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games at Celtic Park in Glasgow, Scotland, Wednesday, July 23, 2014. (AP Photo/Danny Lawson, Pool)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II reads the message from the Queen's baton during the opening ceremony for the Commonwealth Games 2014 in Glasgow, Scotland, Wednesday July 23, 2014. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth visit the throne room at the set of the Game of Thrones TV series in Belfast's Titanic Quarter, Northern Ireland, Tuesday, June, 24, 2014. The Queen is on a 3 day visit to northern Ireland. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II arrives for a garden party at Hillsborough Castle, Northern Ireland, Tuesday, June, 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II plants a tree during a garden party held at Hillsborough Castle, on day two of her visit to Northern Ireland, Tuesday June 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Liam McBurney, Pool)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth arrives at Hillsborough Castle, Northern Ireland, Monday, June, 23, 2014. The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh arrived in Northern Ireland for the beginning of a three-day visit. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth smiles to the media as she arrives at Hillsborough Castle, Northern Ireland, Monday, June, 23, 2014. The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh arrived in Northern Ireland for the beginning of a three-day visit. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
TORONTO, ON: Photo by Boris Spremo October 2 1984. Queen Elizabeth II and Art Eggleton at St. Mike's. Royal tour to Canada 1984. (Boris Spremo/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON: Queen Elizabeth II. Photo by Boris Spremo October 2 1984. Queen at City Hall. Royal tour to Canada 1984 (Boris Spremo/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
GLASGOW, SCOTLAND - JULY 24: Queen Elizabeth II visits the Tollcross International Swimming Centre during day one of the 20th Commonwealth Games on July 24, 2014 in Glasgow, Scotland. (Photo by Michael Schofield - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON: Photo by Boris Spremo October 2 1984. Queen Elizabeth at city hall. royal tour to canada 1984 (Boris Spremo/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
GLASGOW, SCOTLAND - JULY 24: (EDITORS NOTE: This Image has been converted to black and white) Queen Elizabeth II smiles as she visits the Glasgow National Hockey Centre to watch the hockey during day one of 20th Commonwealth Games on July 24, 2014 in Glasgow, Scotland. (Photo by Chris Jackson - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
GLASGOW, UNITED KINGDOM - JULY 23: (EMBARGOED FOR PUBLICATION IN UK NEWSPAPERS UNTIL 48 HOURS AFTER CREATE DATE AND TIME) Sophie Countess of Wessex (left), Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex (2nd left), Sir Chris Hoy (3rd left) and Queen Elizabeth II (right) look on as Prince Imran of Malaysia, CGF President attempts to open The Queen's Baton during the Opening Ceremony for the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games at Celtic Park on July 23, 2014 in Glasgow, Scotland. (Photo by Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II waves as she arrives during the opening ceremony of the 2014 Commonwealth Games at Celtic Park in Glasgow on July 23, 2014. AFP PHOTO/ GLYN KIRK (Photo credit should read GLYN KIRK/AFP/Getty Images)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II toasts with French President Francois Hollande at a state dinner at the Elysee presidential palace in Paris, following the international D-Day commemoration ceremonies in Normandy, marking the 70th anniversary of the World War II Allied landings in Normandy. AFP PHOTO / POOL / ERIC FEFERBERG (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
A tourist boat passes as workers help to hang a giant image from a building on the south bank of the River Thames in London showing Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, fifth left, and from left the royal family, Prince Charles, Prince Edward, Prince Andrew, Earl Mountbatten, Prince Phillip, Mark Phillips and Princess Anne standing on the balcony of Buckingham Palace during the Queen's 1977 Silver Jubilee, Friday, May 25, 2012. The giant canvas, measuring 100 meters by 70 meters and weighing nearly two tons, was officially unveiled on Friday and will be displayed until the end of June, in celebration of the Diamond Jubilee, marking the Queen's 60 year reign. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
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