Estimated 7,000 fans trade in Ray Rice jerseys

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Estimated 7,000 fans trade in Ray Rice jerseys
A worker folds up a former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice jersey that a fan traded in, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014, at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. The Ravens offered fans a chance to exchange their Rice jerseys for those of another player after he was cut by the team and suspended indefinitely by the NFL for domestic violence. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
April Stup, center, folds up a Baltimore Ravens linebacker Elvis Dumervil jersey in exchange for a fan's running back Ray Rice jersey, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014, at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. The Ravens offered fans a chance to trade in their Rice jerseys for those of another player after he was cut by the team and suspended indefinitely by the NFL for domestic violence. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Football fans wait in line to trade in their former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice jerseys, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014, at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. The Ravens offered fans a chance to trade in their Rice jerseys for those of another player after he was cut by the team and suspended indefinitely by the NFL for domestic violence. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Janay Rice, back left, looks on as her husband, Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, speaks during an NFL football news conference, Friday, May 23, 2014, at the team's practice facility in Owings Mills, Md. Ray Rice spoke to the media for the first time since his arrest for assaulting his fiance, now his wife, at a casino in Atlantic City, N.J. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
OWINGS MILLS, MD - MAY 23: Running back Ray Rice of the Baltimore Ravens pauses while addressing a news conference with his wife Janay at the Ravens training center on May 23, 2014 in Owings Mills, Maryland. Rice spoke publicly for the first time since facing felony assault charges stemming from a February incident involving Janay at an Atlantic City casino. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
Former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice jerseys that fans traded in sit in cardboard boxes, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014, at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. The Ravens offered fans a chance to exchange their Rice jerseys for those of another player after he was cut by the team and suspended indefinitely by the NFL for domestic violence. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 11, 2014, file photo, Karla Owens wears a Baltimore Ravens' Ray Rice jersey as she tailgates before the Ravens' NFL football game against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Baltimore. Some would say the league is at a moral crossroads as focus on abuse allegations against players and the their response to them intensifies. Some women have been among the most vocal NFL detractors. Yet female NFL fans, who are stinking mad about the abuse and the way the league has handled it, continue to watch. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
Ian Katz, right, of Baltimore, orders a pizza from bartender Abby Hopper, left, of Baltimore, at Hersh's Pizza and Drinks, a Baltimore restaurant that offered a free personal pizza in exchange for a Ray Rice Baltimore Ravens football jersey Monday, Sept. 8, 2014. Rice was let go by the Ravens on Monday and suspended indefinitely by the NFL after a video was released showing the running back striking his then-fiancee in February. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 11, 2014, file photo, Daniel Old wears a Baltimore Ravens' Ray Rice jersey as she tailgates before an NFL football game against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Baltimore, Md. Some would say the league is at a moral crossroads as focus on abuse allegations against players and the their response to them intensifies. Some women have been among the most vocal NFL detractors. Yet female NFL fans, who are stinking mad about the abuse and the way the league has handled it, continue to watch. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2014, file photo, Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice sits on the sideline in the first half of an NFL preseason football game against the San Francisco 49ers in Baltimore. The Ravens have cut Ray Rice. Hours after the release of a video that appears to show Rice striking his then-fiancee in February, the team terminated his contract Monday, Sept. 8, 2014. (AP Photo/Nick Wass, File)
Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, right, speaks alongside his wife Janay during an NFL football news conference, Friday, May 23, 2014, at the team's practice facility in Owings Mills, Md. Ray Rice spoke to the media for the first time since his arrest for assaulting his fiance, now his wife, at a casino in Atlantic City, N.J. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Football fans wait in line to trade in their former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice jerseys, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014, at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. The Ravens offered fans a chance to trade in their Rice jerseys for those of another player after he was cut by the team and suspended indefinitely by the NFL for domestic violence. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Kristen Moyer receives a high-five from her son Tyler, 4, after they traded in his Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice jersey, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014, at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. The Ravens offered fans a chance to trade in their Rice jerseys for those of another player after he was cut by the team and suspended indefinitely by the NFL for domestic violence. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
FILE - In this July 31, 2014, file photo, Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, right, walks off the field with Justin Forsett before addressing the media at a news conference in Owings Mills, Md. The Ravens have cut Ray Rice. Hours after the release of a video that appears to show Rice striking his then-fiancee in February, the team terminated his contract Monday, Sept. 8, 2014. (AP Photo/Gail Burton, File)
Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, right, speaks alongside his wife Janay during an NFL football news conference, Friday, May 23, 2014, at the team's practice facility in Owings Mills, Md. Ray Rice spoke to the media for the first time since his arrest for assaulting his fiance, now his wife, at a casino in Atlantic City, N.J. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Janay Rice listens as her husband, Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, not pictured, speaks during an NFL football news conference, Friday, May 23, 2014, at the team's practice facility in Owings Mills, Md. Ray Rice spoke to the media for the first time since his arrest for assaulting his fiance, now his wife, at a casino in Atlantic City, N.J. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Ravens running back Ray Rice and his wife Janay made statements to the news media May 5, 2014, at the Under Armour Performance Center in Owings Mills, Md, regarding his assault charge for knocking her unconscious in a New Jersey casino. On Monday, Sept. 9, 2014, Rice was let go from the Baltimore Ravens after a video surfaced from TMZ showing the incident. (Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun/MCT via Getty Images)
Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice answers question during a news conference after NFL football training camp, Thursday, July 31, 2014, in Owings Mills, Md.(AP Photo/Gail Burton)
ARLINGTON, TX - AUGUST 16: Ray Rice #27 of the Baltimore Ravens sits on the bench against the Dallas Cowboys in the first half of their preseason game at AT&T Stadium on August 16, 2014 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, TX - AUGUST 16: Ray Rice #27 of the Baltimore Ravens smiles during warm ups before their game against the Dallas Cowboys at AT&T Stadium on August 16, 2014 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
OWINGS MILLS, MD - MAY 23: Baltimore Ravens assistant director of public relations Patrick M. Gleason holds the door as running back Ray Rice enter a news conference followed by his wife Janay Rice and Ravens team President Dick Cass at the Ravens training center on May 23, 2014 in Owings Mills, Maryland. Rice spoke publicly for the first time since facing felony assault charges stemming from a February incident involving Janay at an Atlantic City casino. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice enters an NFL football news conference with his wife Janay, back right,, Friday, May 23, 2014, at the team's practice facility in Owings Mills, Md. Rice spoke to the media for the first time since his arrest for assaulting his fiance, now his wife, at a casino in Atlantic City, N.J. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Baltimore Ravens football player and former Rutgers University standout, Ray Rice holds hands with his wife Janay Palmer as they arrive at Atlantic County Criminal Courthouse in Mays Landing, N.J., Thursday, May 1, 2014. After Rice and Janay Palmer got into a physical altercation on Feb. 15 at an Atlantic City casino, both were charged with simple assault-domestic violence. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, left, leaves a NFL football news conference with his wife Janay, Friday, May 23, 2014, at the team's practice facility in Owings Mills, Md. Ray Rice spoke to the media for the first time since his arrest for assaulting his fiance, now his wife, at a casino in Atlantic City, N.J. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, left, looks back as he hugs his father-in-law Joe Palmer after an NFL football news conference, Friday, May 23, 2014, at the team's practice facility in Owings Mills, Md. Rice spoke to the media for the first time since his arrest for assaulting his fiance, now his wife, at a casino in Atlantic City, N.J. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice pauses as he speaks during an NFL football news conference, Friday, May 23, 2014, at the team's practice facility in Owings Mills, Md. Rice and his wife Janay spoke to the media for the first time since his arrest for assaulting his then-fiance at a casino in Atlantic City, N.J. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Baltimore Ravens football player and former Rutgers University standout, Ray Rice holds hands with his wife Janay Palmer as they arrive at Atlantic County Criminal Courthouse in Mays Landing, N.J., Thursday, May 1, 2014. After Rice and Janay Palmer got into a physical altercation on Feb. 15 at an Atlantic City casino, both were charged with simple assault-domestic violence. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Baltimore Ravens football player Ray Rice, second from left, and his attorney Michael Diamondstein stand during Rice's arraignment at the Atlantic County Courthouse Thursday, May 1, 2014, in Mays Landing, N.J. Rice's wife Janay Palmer is seated at right. After Rice and Palmer got into a physical altercation on Feb. 15 at an Atlantic City casino, both were charged with simple assault-domestic violence. (AP Photo/The Philadelphia Inquirer, Tom Gralish, Pool)
Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice removes his jersey after a training camp practice, Thursday, July 24, 2014, at the team's practice facility in Owings Mills, Md. (AP Photo)
Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice walks off the field after a training camp practice, Thursday, July 24, 2014, at the team's practice facility in Owings Mills, Md. (AP Photo)
SANTA CLARA, CA - JULY 17: NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell sits in the crowd during the the Ribbon Cutting Ceremony for Levi Stadium on July 17, 2014 in Santa Clara, California. (Photo by Michael Zagaris/San Francisco 49ers/Getty Images)
Maine Governor Paul LePage in his office at the State House in Augusta. LePage, who was beaten by his father when he was young and has made domestic abuse prevention and awareness a priority of his administration, wrote a scathing letter to NFL commissioner Roger Goodell about the controversial two-game suspension levied on Ray Rice after a domestic incident involving his wife at a N.J. hotel.
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell speaks at a press conference at the NFL's spring meeting, Tuesday, May 20, 2014, in Atlanta. Goodell has been criticized for suspending Ravens running back Ray Rice for two games following a domestic incident at a N.J. hotel.
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BALTIMORE (AP) - More than 7,000 fans showed up to exchange their Ray Rice jerseys for those of other Ravens players during a two-day event at Baltimore's home team officials said Saturday.

The Ravens handed out 5,595 new jerseys before running out before midday Saturday, then issued more than 2,400 vouchers for fans to pick up their jerseys once new shipments arrive in October.

Team spokesman Kevin Byrne said the Ravens spent "six figures" on the trade-in. He declined to disclose an exact figure.

"We anticipated over the two days getting about 5,000 people, so we got about 2,000 more," Byrne said. "We just felt it was the right thing to do, and that's why we did it."

Byrne said the jerseys collected by the team will be given to companies that deal in scrap materials.

"The NFL licensed jerseys are not recyclable because of certain materials in parts of the jersey, so what we're going to do is offer them to companies who deal in scrap," Byrne said. "We're not getting paid for it. We'll just give it to them, and they can do with it as they please."

Approximately 15 percent of those who showed up had their jerseys rejected because either they were not officially licensed by the NFL or hadn't been available through the team's online or stadium store. The team offered them token gifts in exchange.

"It's clearly an unusual time for the franchise," Byrne said. "I think the one thing that we've tried to be, historically . is that we've been transparent. So this is new territory for us. We're learning as we go."

Fans began lining up as early as 4 a.m. on the first day of the exchange Friday. By the time gates opened at 8 a.m. on Friday, there were estimated to be more than 1,000 people in a line that stretched at least halfway around the stadium.

The most requested jerseys, according to the team, were those of quarterback Joe Flacco and wide receiver Torrey Smith. Five other player jerseys also were available.

Ross Sober and his 9-year-old son, Logan, of Hampstead, Md., arrived at around 9:45 Saturday to find an imposing line that stretched much of the way around the stadium.

Still, they completed the exchange in 50 minutes, turning in two youth jerseys. Both Logan and his 12-year-old brother Griffin were hoping to land Lardarius Webb jerseys before the stock ran out.

Still, their father was quite pleased with the process.

"It was as rosy an event as you could hope for," Sober said. "The people at the counter where we got our voucher were smiling and happy. The guy noticed that we had a Super Bowl patch ironed on, and he ripped the patch off and gave it back to us. It was orderly, it was friendly and nobody was protesting. You couldn't ask for better."

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