Police step up security in Los Cabos after Odile

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Odile aftermath in Los Cabos
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Police step up security in Los Cabos after Odile
A man stands by the collapsed Aduano bridge leading to in Los Cabos, Mexico, that fell Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014, several days after Hurricane Odile, a category 3 storm, hit the region. President Enrique Pena Nieto's office said the federal government was working closely with state authorities on relief efforts in the areas battered by Odile, including restoring water and electricity. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
People stand on the collapsed Aduano bridge leading to in Los Cabos, Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014, several days after Hurricane Odile, a category 3 storm, hit the region. President Enrique Pena Nieto's office said the federal government was working closely with state authorities on relief efforts in the areas battered by Odile, including restoring water and electricity. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A man stands over the collapsed Aduano bridge leading to in Los Cabos, Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014, several days after Hurricane Odile, a category 3 storm, hit the region. President Enrique Pena Nieto's office said the federal government was working closely with state authorities on relief efforts in the areas battered by Odile, including restoring water and electricity. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
People stand over the collapsed Aduano bridge leading to in Los Cabos, Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014, several days after Hurricane Odile, a category 3 storm, hit the region. President Enrique Pena Nieto's office said the federal government was working closely with state authorities on relief efforts in the areas battered by Odile, including restoring water and electricity. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A man holding an air rifle in a white jersey fights with two other men as he tries to stop looters from storming into the Mega Supermarket in Los Cabos, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. According to employees the supermarket donated all the food in the store and established a system by which every person had 5 minutes to get whatever they could for free. Fights broke as other people inciting the crowd to loot. Desperate locals and tourists were in survival mode in the resort area of Los Cabos also on Wednesday, with electrical and water service still out three days after Hurricane Odile made landfall as a monster Category 3 storm. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
An employee from Mega Supermarket stands guard with an air rifle to prevent people from looting the store in Los Cabos, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. According to employees the supermarket donated all the food in the store and established a system by which every person had 5 minutes to get whatever they could for free. Fights broke as other people inciting the crowd to loot. Desperate locals and tourists were in survival mode in the resort area of Los Cabos also on Wednesday, with electrical and water service still out three days after Hurricane Odile made landfall as a monster Category 3 storm. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
An employee from Mega Supermarket fires an air rifle at people trying to loot the store in Los Cabos, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The sign in the background reads in Spanish "Welcome." According to employees the supermarket donated all the food in the store and established a system by which every person had 5 minutes to get whatever they could for free. Fights broke as other people inciting the crowd to loot. Desperate locals and tourists were in survival mode in the resort area of Los Cabos also on Wednesday, with electrical and water service still out three days after Hurricane Odile made landfall as a monster Category 3 storm. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A man, center in orange, tries to prevent another one from storming a supermarket in Los Cabos, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. Employees of the supermarket said the company donated all the food at the market and established a system by which every person had 5 minutes to get whatever they could for free as fights broke outside with people inciting the crowd to loot. Desperate locals and tourists were in survival mode in the resort area of Los Cabos also on Wednesday, with electrical and water service still out three days after Hurricane Odile made landfall as a monster Category 3 storm.(AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
An elderly man is helped by U.S. Embassy staff during the evacuation of tourists from the resort city San Jose de los Cabos, Mexico, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014, after Hurricane Odile devastated the resort city. Authorities said they had flown 5,000 tourists out of the region by Wednesday afternoon. Officials estimated 30,000 travelers were stranded by the storm. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)
Mexico's newest police force, the Gendarmerie federal police, organize the evacuation of tourists after Hurricane Odile devastated the tourist resort city of San Jose de los Cabos, Mexico, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. Authorities said they had flown 5,000 tourists out of the region by Wednesday afternoon. Officials estimated 30,000 travelers were stranded by the storm. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)
Tourists wait to be evacuated at the airport after Hurricane Odile devastated the tourist resort city of San Jose de los Cabos, Mexico, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. Authorities said they had flown 5,000 tourists out of the region by Wednesday afternoon. Officials estimated 30,000 travelers were stranded by the storm. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)
A plane destroyed by Hurricane Odile sits overturned at Cabo San Lucas airport Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. Desperate locals and tourists were in survival mode in the resort area of Los Cabos on Wednesday, with electrical and water service still out three days after Hurricane Odile made landfall as a monster Category 3 storm. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Mexico's newest police force, the Gendarmerie federal police, organize the evacuation of tourists after Hurricane Odile devastated the tourist resort city of San Jose de los Cabos, Mexico, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. Authorities said they had flown 5,000 tourists out of the region by Wednesday afternoon. Officials estimated 30,000 travelers were stranded by the storm. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)
A view of a car dealership that was heavily damaged by hurricane Odile in San Jose de los Cabos, Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. After Odile roared past, residents of the resort state of Baja California Sur struggled with a lack of power and running water and formed long lines for emergency supplies. There were scattered reports of looting. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)
A view of a Wal-Mart super store that was damaged and then looted after the passing of hurricane Odile in San Jose de los Cabos, Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. After Odile roared past, residents of the resort state of Baja California Sur struggled with a lack of power and running water and formed long lines for emergency supplies. There were scattered reports of looting. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)
A plane destroyed by Hurricane Odile sits at Cabo San Lucas airport Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. Desperate locals and tourists were in survival mode in the resort area of Los Cabos on Wednesday, with electrical and water service still out three days after Hurricane Odile made landfall as a monster Category 3 storm.(AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Vanesa Torres, from Mexico, center, holds her one-year-old baby Arantxa as they wait to be evacuated with about 50 tourists and locals aboard Mexican air force cargo plane to Mexico City from Los Cabos, Mexico, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. Mexican authorities said 8,000 people, including tourists and locals anxious to leave, would be airlifted out on Thursday from Los Cabos following the blow from Hurricane Odile. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Residents stand by a bonfire set inside a steel drum as they stand outside guarding their homes as they face a fourth day without power and running water following the blow from Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, late Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. Federal police on Thursday vowed to crack down on lawlessness and restore order in the hurricane-stricken resort area of Los Cabos after looting emptied store shelves and unnerved residents who worried their homes could be next. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Nichole Yadidi, right, and her cousin Ashley Gharibian, second right, both from Los Angeles, California, sleep while waiting in line for a flight out of the airport in La Paz, Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. Los Cabos' heavily damaged international airport was being powered by an emergency generator from the Federal Electricity Commission. Tourism Secretary Claudia Ruiz Massieu said 8,000 people, including tourists and locals anxious to leave, would be airlifted out on Thursday. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
People stand in line to get free food from a Mega Supermarket in Los Cabos, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. According to employees the supermarket donated all the food in the store and established a system by which every person had 5 minutes to get whatever they could for free. Desperate locals and tourists were in survival mode in the resort area of Los Cabos also on Wednesday, with electrical and water service still out three days after Hurricane Odile made landfall as a monster Category 3 storm. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
People carry looted goods taken from Walmart in Cabo San Lucas , Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. Desperate locals and tourists were in survival mode in the resort area of Los Cabos on Wednesday, with electrical and water service still out three days after Hurricane Odile made landfall as a monster Category 3 storm. Looters stripped supermarkets of their food and other products, with some people fighting over goods. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
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By DARIO LOPEZ-MILLS

CABO SAN LUCAS, Mexico (AP) - Police stepped up patrols in the resort area of Los Cabos, where looters stripped many stores of goods and tens of thousands faced a fourth day without water or power Thursday in the aftermath of Hurricane Odile.

Authorities told local radio that officers would stop and question anyone found on the streets after nightfall Wednesday to make sure they had legitimate business at that hour. Officials stopped short of calling it a curfew.

The measure sought to allay security concerns after days of looting of that extended from convenience stores to big-box retailers. Some residents worried that private homes and condos could be next.

"People are running down streets with shopping carts, and you can see the desperation," Madelynn Pase, a 23-year-old Canadian living in Los Cabos, said by phone. "The supermarkets are all empty, so they're going to go to the next best thing."

Pase said people had been walking around at night shining flashlights into residences, including hers, and she worried would-be robbers could be casing potential targets. She spent the previous two nights sleeping on the floor to make it seem like her place was abandoned, and therefore without any food inside.

Residents in Cabo San Lucas lit bonfires overnight to try to protect their neighborhoods amid scenes of widespread damage.

Looters Run Rampant and Tourists Stranded After Odile Slams Mexico's Baja

The roof of an auto dealership collapsed onto a half-dozen cars, and debris was strewn about inside. Inside a waterlogged Wal-Mart superstore, nothing but puddles, trash, empty shelves and graffiti on the wall: "Long live crime!"

Some people lined up with 10-liter (2.6-gallon) jugs and at a water station. Others ventured to the top of a small hill that seemed to be one of the few places with cellphone coverage.

Civil Protection officials reported that the town of Bahia de Los Angeles in the state of Baja California was cut off because of storm damage to the only highway that serves it. A long stretch of the asphalt was completely washed out, and a tractor-trailer lay on its side.

President Enrique Pena Nieto's office said the federal government was working closely with state authorities on relief efforts in the areas battered by Odile, including restoring water and electricity.

It said more than 239,000 people had their power knocked out by the storm, but predicted 95 percent of electrical service would be restored in the coming days.

Authorities said they had flown 5,000 tourists out of the region by Wednesday afternoon. Thousands more were lined up at Los Cabos international airport Thursday. Officials estimated 30,000 travelers were stranded by the storm.

Government planes were also flying in water and other supplies.

After hammering the Baja California Peninsula and other parts of northern Mexico in recent days, the remnants of Odile slammed much of southeastern Arizona but spared the state's metro areas.

To the south, Hurricane Polo was off Mexico's Pacific coast and headed in the general direction of Los Cabos, although early predictions were for the center to remain offshore.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Polo was 150 miles (240 kilometers) southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico, with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph (120 kph). It was moving northwest at 8 mph (13 kph).

In the central Atlantic, Hurricane Edouard was forecast to remain far from land, although swells could cause dangerous surf along parts of the U.S. East Coast north of Florida and Canada.

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