House featured in 'American Gothic' painting vacant again

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Iconic 'American Gothic' House Up For Grabs

If farm livin' is the life for you, then get ready to pack your bags. You could soon be hanging out in history's most famous little farm house. The iconic home from Grant Wood's 1930 painting American Gothic is vacant.


10 PHOTOS
'American Gothic' house vacant again
See Gallery
House featured in 'American Gothic' painting vacant again
This image provided by The Art Institute of Chicago via Art Everywhere, shows Grant Wood's 1930 "American Gothic." Five museums say they are organizing the largest outdoor art show to showcase American art nationwide this summer. Beginning Monday, April 7, 2014, curators are asking the public to vote online to choose which artwork will be featured on 50,000 displays for the “Art Everywhere” initiative in August. Members of the Outdoor Advertising Association of America are donating the space. (AP Photo/Art Institute of Chicago, Friends of American Art Collection)
** ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND EDITIONS, AUG. 3-5 **This simple house, pictured June 21, 2007, in Eldon, Iowa, was made famous in Grant Wood's painting "American Gothic." Eldon residents hope that completion of a $1 million visitors center, built with money cobbled together from years of bake sales and raffles coupled with government grants, will draw more visitors to the isolated town and entice them to stick around longer than the time it takes to snap a photo. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
** ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND EDITIONS, AUG. 3-5 **John and Dorothy Greenfield, of Centerville, Ohio, pose for a photo in front of the American Gothic House, Thursday, June 21, 2007, in Eldon, Iowa. Residents of the small town hope that completion of a $1 million visitors center, built with money cobbled together from years of bake sales and raffles coupled with government grants, will draw more visitors and entice them to stick around longer than the time it takes to snap a photo. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
A street sign marks the location of the American Gothic house, background, July 17, 2001, in Eldon, Iowa. Grant Wood's "American Gothic," like the "Mona Lisa" and "Whistler's Mother," holds a place among the small number of paintings that have become more than paintings. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
** ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND EDITIONS, AUG. 3-5 **This window, made famous in Grant Wood's painting "American Gothic," is at the center of a small house in Eldon, Iowa, pictured June 21, 2007. Eldon residents hope that completion of a $1 million visitors center, built with money cobbled together from years of bake sales and raffles coupled with government grants, will draw more visitors to the isolated town and entice them to stick around longer than the time it takes to snap a photo. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


"After several weeks of debating how to break the news, I'm just going to come right and say it: I moved out of the American Gothic House. It was an amazing 4 years of pie-, people-, and book-filled adventures," wrote Beth Howard on her company Facebook page yesterday.


Howard's 'Ms. American Pie' cookbook even used the famous facade on the cover, complete with pitchfork. The 'Pie Lady' goes on to say that she's moving on to greener pastures: another farm in Iowa with lots of privacy.

The American Gothic home is nestled in Eldon, Iowa, a town with a population of only 900 people (though it's become quite an attraction for thousands of tourists). According to the American Gothic House Center, located right next door, the home was built around 1881 by the original owners who later lost the place because of overdue taxes.

Over the years several people have lived in the house and most recently Beth Howard says she was only charged $250 a month to rent the iconic space.

"There should be a statute of limitations for how long one can live in a tourist attraction," Howard told the Des Moines Register. "With two books out and with a single woman whose picture is on the cover of a best-selling cookbook, I started to feel a little more vulnerable living there alone."

Howard says she had to keep the curtains drawn most of the time and even had a tourist peeking through the windows on one occasion.

Now, If you're one of the few brave enough to live smack in the middle of a tourist attraction, don't call the movers just yet.

The historical society is still decided whether or not they want to find a new renter for the property.


More on AOL:
'Destination America': What kind of house $300K gets you across the country
Artist posts 15,000 flyers looking for love in NYC
Famous TV and movie homes sell for millions
Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners