Rare meteor sighting on the East coast

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East Coast Treated to Rare Meteor Sighting

People living along the East Coast might have seen a large meteor flash across the sky Sunday night.

News 12 New Jersey even managed to capture video of it.

WCAU reported people in Pennsylvania and Delaware also said they saw the meteor.

In fact, Just In Weather, which mapped out where reports of the meteor came from, says it was also seen by people in Maryland, Virginia and even New York City.

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Rare meteor sighting on the East coast
PRECISING NATURE OF FALLING OBJECT A man in Moscow looks at a computer screen displaying a picture reportedly taken in the Urals city of Chelyabinsk on February 15, 2013, showing the trail of a meteorite above a residential area of the city. A heavy meteor shower rained down today on central Russia, sowing panic as the hurtling space debris smashed windows and injured dozens of stunned locals, officials said. AFP PHOTO / YURI KADOBNOV (Photo credit should read YURI KADOBNOV/AFP/Getty Images)
PRECISING NATURE OF FALLING OBJECT A meteorite trail is seen above a residential apartment block in the Urals city of Chelyabinsk, on February 15, 2013. A heavy meteor shower rained down today on central Russia, sowing panic as the hurtling space debris smashed windows and injured dozens of stunned locals, officials said. AFP PHOTO / 74.RU/ OLEG KARGOPOLOV (Photo credit should read OLEG KARGOPOLOV/AFP/Getty Images)
GZHEL, RUSSIAN FEDERATION: A view of the night sky over Gzhel region, some 80 km east of Moscow shows the star's path created by the earth rotation, early 12 August 2005. On the night between 12 August and 13 August is expected the peack of the Perseids meteor shower over the sky of the northern hemisphere. The Perseids come every year, beginning in late July and stretching into August. Sky watchers outdoors at the right time can see colorful fireballs, occasional outbursts and, almost always, long hours of gracefully streaking meteors. The source of the shower is Comet Swift-Tuttle. Tiny bits of comet dust hit Earth's atmosphere traveling 132,000 mph. At that speed, even a tiny smidgen of dust makes a vivid streak of light 'a meteor'when it disintegrates. AFP PHOTO / MAXIM MARMUR (Photo credit should read MAXIM MARMUR/AFP/Getty Images)
GZHEL, RUSSIAN FEDERATION: A view of the night sky over Gzhel region, some 80 km east of Moscow shows the star's path created by the earth rotation, early 12 August 2005. On the night between 12 August and 13 August is expected the peack of the Perseids meteor shower over the sky of the northern hemisphere. The Perseids come every year, beginning in late July and stretching into August. Sky watchers outdoors at the right time can see colorful fireballs, occasional outbursts and, almost always, long hours of gracefully streaking meteors. The source of the shower is Comet Swift-Tuttle. Tiny bits of comet dust hit Earth's atmosphere traveling 132,000 mph. At that speed, even a tiny smidgen of dust makes a vivid streak of light 'a meteor'when it disintegrates. AFP PHOTO / MAXIM MARMUR (Photo credit should read MAXIM MARMUR/AFP/Getty Images)
This long-exposure photograph taken on August 12, 2013 shows people watching for the Perseid meteor shower in the night sky near Yangon. The meteor shower occurs every year in August when the Earth passes through the debris and dust of the Swift-Tuttle comet. AFP PHOTO / Ye Aung Thu (Photo credit should read Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - SEPTEMBER 07: A bright meteor during Perseid meteor shower (Aug. 12) is captured in a star trail image of constellation Orion. (Photo by Babek Tafreshi/SSPL/Getty Images)
A meteor streaks across the sky against a field of stars during a meteorite shower early August 13, 2010 near Grazalema, southern Spain. AFP PHOTO/ JORGE GUERRERO (Photo credit should read Jorge Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images)
VICTORVILLE, USA - DECEMBER 14: This incredible picture shows a huge meteor hurtling to earth during the annual Geminid meteor shower on December 14, 2009. Taken from the Mojave Desert area near Victorville under a very dark and mostly clear sky, astro-photogrpaher Wally Pacholka captured this amazing picture during the annual cosmic fireworks show. The meteor shower has been growing in intensity in recent decades and was an even better holiday treat than usual this year with it falling in a nearly moonless week. Featuring as many as 140 shooting stars per hour, the Geminid show took place between Sunday evening and Monday morning. (Photo by Wally Pacholka / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
In this long exposure photo, a streak appears in the sky during the annual Perseid meteor shower above a roadside silhouette of a Spanish fighting bull, conceived decades ago in Spain as highway billboards, in Villarejo de Salvanes, central Spain in the early hours of Monday Aug. 12, 2013. (AP Photo/Paul White)
A meteor shines, top left, while entering the earth's atmosphere during the Perseid Meteor Shower observed early Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013, in this long exposure picture taken from village of Kozle, just southeast of Skopje, Macedonia. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski)
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The American Meteor Society determined the meteor was "most likely a random occurrence" since there have been no reports of active meteor showers recently.

News 12 New Jersey spoke with an astronomy professor at William Paterson University who said the meteor was traveling up to 100 miles above the planet.

Jason Kendall said, "It probably did not hit the ground, but rather skipped off the Earth's atmosphere."

According to NASA, meteors start out as meteoroids, which are bits of rock floating in space. It's when those pieces fall from space that they're called meteors.

The flash of bright light they create is why they're commonly known as shooting stars.

Experts believe about 10 to 50 meteorites -- the debris found after a meteor falls -- are dropped every day on Earth. Of course, the majority of these meteorites and their meteors aren't seen because they occur over oceans or uninhabited places.

The operations manager for the American Meteor Society told NJ.com, this is why it's "rare for people to see them because they only last a few seconds. You'll be lucky to see one in your entire lifetime."

It's difficult to predict where you could see a meteor, but there are a few meteor showers that happen every year. If you want to see some shooting stars, head over to The University of Texas McDonald Observatory's website to learn when those meteor showers occur.

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