Oklahoma City bombing memorial adds new exhibits

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Oklahoma City bombing exhibit - The Oklahoma City National Memorial - trial
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Oklahoma City bombing memorial adds new exhibits
The north side of the Alfred Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City is shown in this undated handout photo. The building was heavily damaged by a car bomb early Wednesday, April 19, 1995. (AP Photo/ho)
In this July 16, 2014, photo, Salt Lake City attorney Jesse Trentadue holds a photograph of his brother, Kenneth Trentadue, in the early 80's showing his dragon tattoo on his left forearm which fit the description the FBI was circulating of "John Doe 2" during an interview, in Salt Lake City. Trentadue's quest to explain his brother’s mysterious jail cell death has rekindled long-dormant questions about whether others were involved in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. Trentadue's Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against the federal government goes to trial Monday, July 28, 2014, in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
EDS NOTE GRAPHIC CONTENT - Salt Lake City attorney Jesse Trentadue holds a photograph of his holds a photograph of his dead brother showing his bruises and injuries during an interview Wednesday, July 16, 2014, in Salt Lake City. Trentadue's quest to explain his brother’s mysterious jail cell death has rekindled long-dormant questions about whether others were involved in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. Trentadue's Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against the federal government goes to trial Monday, July 28, 2014, in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
In this photo released by Jesse Trentadue, Jesse and his brother, Kenneth Trentadue, right, pose for their picture in 1995 in the mountains above Park City, Utah. Jesse is investigating the August 1995 death of his brother in a federal prison. (AP Photo/courtesy of Jesse Trentadue)
Scott Adams, the Oklahoma City lawyer for the Kenneth Trentadue family, stands in front of a poster of Kenneth Trentadue, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 1997, in his Oklahoma City office. The poster features a photo of Trentadue in his casket. Federal officals at the Oklahoma City Federal Transfer Center claim that Trentadue committed suicide while at the center two years ago. However, his family and Adams believe he was murdered. His body was covered with bruises. (AP Photo/J. Pat Carter)
In this April 17, 2014 photo a visitor walks through a renovated Gallery of Honor, an exhibit about victims of the bombing, that is part of the $7 million upgrade at The Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum, in Oklahoma City. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Ted Krey of Yukon, Okla., a first responder to the attack on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, walks with his dog, Pokie, along the Reflecting Pool at the Oklahoma City Memorial in Oklahoma City on Saturday, April 19, 2014, the 19th anniversary of the bombing. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin speaks at the Oklahoma City National Memorial in Oklahoma City on Saturday, April 19, 2014 during a ceremony to mark the 19th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Jannie Coverdale walks among the Field of Chairs at the Oklahoma City Bombing Memorial in Oklahoma City, Friday, July 25, 2014, looking for the chairs of her two grandchildren, who were killed in the blast. Coverdale said she is hopeful that an upcoming trial in Utah will shed light on the bombing. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
In this July 16, 2014, photo, Salt Lake City attorney Jesse Trentadue holds a photograph of his brother taken in the early 80's showing his dragon tattoo on his left forearm which fit the description the FBI was circulating of "John Doe 2", during an interview, in Salt Lake City. Trentadue's quest to explain his brother’s mysterious jail cell death has rekindled long-dormant questions about whether others were involved in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. Trentadue's Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against the federal government goes to trial Monday, July 28, 2014, in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
Cary Falling, Oklahoma Christian University physical plant director, checks on a display of flags at the school in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013. The school has 168 U.S. and 168 state of Oklahoma flags on display to honor victims of terrorist attacks. The "Ralph and Maxine Harvey Field of Flags" at Oklahoma Christian is a dual tribute to the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing, in which 168 people died. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
New Mexico Lt. Governor John Sanchez looks at a large photograph of the bombed Murrah Federal Building while on a tour of the Oklahma City National Memorial Museum with Lieutenant Governors in town for their annual meeting in Oklahoma City, Thursday, July 18, 2013. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
An aerial view of the execution facility at the United States Penitentiary in Terre Haute, Ind., is shown in this, April 25, 2001 file photo. On Monday, June 11, 2001, Timothy McVeigh will be the first federal prisoner put to death since 1963. He was convicted for the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, which killed 168 men, women, and children. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
Defense attorney Stephen Jones is seen outside of the U.S. Courthouse in Denver, Colo., Friday, June 13, 1997 after the jury sentenced Timothy McVeigh to death for the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. (AP Photo/Susan Sterner)
This evidence photo of Oklahoma City bombing suspect Timothy McVeigh was introduced at his trial in Denver on Monday, May 19, 1997. It was taken April 19, 1995, just hours after the Oklahoma City bombing, at the Noble County Jail in Perry, Okla., when McVeigh was booked on a firearm charge. (AP Photo/HO)
Terry Nichols is led by U.S. Marshals from the United States Court House in Wichita, Kan., May 10, 1995. No trial date has been set for Nichols and Timothy McVeigh, the two suspects in the April 19, 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. Pre-trial hearings could delay the start until next year. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
Oklahoma City bombing suspect Timothy McVeigh, top center, poses with members of his platoon during a break in infantry training at Ft. Benning, Ga., June 3, 1988. Others are not indentified. (AP Photo)
OKLAHOMA CITY - APRIL 19: John Blitch, who lost family and friends in the bombing of the Murrah Federal Building in 1995, leans upon a chair in the 'Field of Empty Chairs' at the Oklahoma City National Memorial April 19th, 2005 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Today marks the 10th anniversary of the morning when Timothy McVeigh ignited a 4,800-pound fertilizer truck bomb that killed 168 people in what was, at the time, the worst terror attack in American history. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, VA - APRIL 19: (L-R) Bugler MSG Allyn VanPatten of the Army Band plays Taps as CSM Abe Vega of U.S. Army, Secret Service Deputy Director Barbara Riggs and GY Sgt. Christopher Cox of U.S. Marine Corps salute after laying a wreath in front of a memorial stone to remember the 168 Americans who were killed during the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing at Arlington National Cemetery April 19, 2005 in Arlington, VA. The 168 victims included 8 members of the Army, 6 members of the Secret Service and 2 members of the Marine. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, VA - APRIL 19: (L-R) Army Officer Richard Sargent assists White House Commission on Remembrance Director Carmella LaSpada, GY Sgt. Christopher Cox of U.S. Marine Corps, Secret Service Deputy Director Barbara Riggs and CSM Abe Vega of U.S. Army to lay a wreath in front of a memorial stone to remember the 168 Americans who were killed during the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing at Arlington National Cemetery April 19, 2005 in Arlington, VA. The 168 victims included 8 members of the Army, 6 members of the Secret Service and 2 members of the Marine. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, VA - APRIL 19: A wreath is laid in front of a memorial stone after a ceremony to remember the 168 Americans who were killed during the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing at Arlington National Cemetery April 19, 2005 in Arlington, Virginia. The 168 victims included 8 members of the Army, 6 members of the Secret Service and 2 members of the Marine. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, VA - APRIL 19: (L-R) Army Officer Richard Sargent, White House Commission on Remembrance Director Carmella LaSpada, GY Sgt. Christopher Cox of U.S. Marine Corps, Secret Service Deputy Director Barbara Riggs and CSM Abe Vega of U.S. Army salute after laying a wreath in front of a memorial stone to remember the 168 Americans who were killed during the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing at Arlington National Cemetery April 19, 2005 in Arlington, Virginia. The 168 victims included 8 members of the Army, 6 members of the Secret Service and 2 members of the Marine. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
OKLAHOMA CITY - APRIL 19: Lorrain Lovelace (L) comforts Judie Cooper (R) in the 'Field of Empty Chairs' at the Oklahoma City National Memorial April 19, 2005 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Cooper's daughter Dana Cooper, the director of the day care facility in the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, was killed when the building was bombed ten years ago. April 19, 2005 is the 10th anniversary of the morning when Timothy McVeigh ignited a 4,800-pound fertilizer truck bomb that killed 168 people in what was, at the time, the worst terror attack in U.S. history. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
OKLAHOMA CITY - APRIL 19: Carol Tims (L), a survivor of the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, cries at the chair representing Mary Rentie, one the victims who died in the bombing, in the 'Field of Empty Chairs' at the Oklahoma City National Memorial April 19, 2005 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. At right is Tims' friend, Judy Cleveland. April 19, 2005 is the 10th anniversary of the morning when Timothy McVeigh ignited a 4,800-pound fertilizer truck bomb that killed 168 people in what was, at the time, the worst terror attack in U.S. history. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
OKLAHOMA CITY - APRIL 19: Regina Bonny, a survivor of the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, cries at the chair representing one of her five co-workers who died in the bombing, in the 'Field of Empty Chairs' at the Oklahoma City National Memorial April 19, 2005 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. April 19, 2005 is the 10th anniversary of the morning when Timothy McVeigh ignited a 4,800-pound fertilizer truck bomb that killed 168 people in what was, at the time, the worst terror attack in U.S. history. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
OKLAHOMA CITY - APRIL 19: Regina Bonny, a survivor of the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, touches the chair representing one of her five co-workers who died in the bombing in the 'Field of Empty Chairs' at the Oklahoma City National Memorial April 19, 2005 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. April 19, 2005 is the 10th anniversary of the morning when Timothy McVeigh ignited a 4,800-pound fertilizer truck bomb that killed 168 people in what was, at the time, the worst terror attack in U.S. history. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
OKLAHOMA CITY - APRIL 19: J.J. Jackson, who helped rescue survivors of the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, cries at the chair representing one the victims who died in the bombing in the 'Field of Empty Chairs' at the Oklahoma City National Memorial April 19, 2005 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. April 19, 2005 is the 10th anniversary of the morning when Timothy McVeigh ignited a 4,800-pound fertilizer truck bomb that killed 168 people in what was, at the time, the worst terror attack in U.S. history. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, VA - APRIL 19: (R-L) U.S. Army chaplain Kenneth Kerr, James Tomsheck of the U.S. Secretary Service, U.S. Marine Col. Mark Monroe, U.S. Army Col. Lloyd Holloway and Carmella Laspada, White House Commission on Remembrance executive director, pay their respects after they placed a wreath at the Memorial Tree and Stone to Terrorism at Arlington National Ceremony April 19. 2004 in Arlington, Virginia. The wreath was laid to remember the 168 victims who died in the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995. The ceremony marked the ninth anniversary of the bombing. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Oklahoma City Police Department Chaplain Jack Poe salutes during the National Anthem during the 16th Annual Day of Remembrance at the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum in Oklahoma City on Tuesday, April 19, 2011. Okla. Gov. Mary Fallin told those attending a ceremony marking the 16th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing that the intent of the bombing was meant for evil _ but that event has been used for good. (AP Photo/John Clanton, Pool)
ARLINGTON, VA - MAY 10: A veteran of the secret Lao Theater, Bouala Chansombath of Oklahoma City, kneels and offers a prayer at the plaque dedicated to the U.S. Secret Army in the Kingdom of Laos during a memorial and wreath-laying ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery May 10, 2013 in Arlington, Virginia. Supported by the United States and the Central Intelligence Agency from 1961 to 1973, the secret army of Hmong and Lao combat soldiers fought in the jungles of Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Ther Heritage Hall Show Choir sings the Star Spangled Banner at the Oklahoma City National Memorial in Oklahoma City, during a ceremony to mark the 19th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing, Saturday, April 19, 2014. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Members of the Oklahoma Fire Pipes & Drums open the ceremonies at the Oklahoma City National Memorial for the 19th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing in Oklahoma City, Saturday, April 19, 2014. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Cory Shepherd, of Newcastle, Okla., holds his seventeen-month-old son Corbin Shepherd in the Field of Chairs at the Oklahoma City National Memorial in Oklahoma City, on the 19th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing, Saturday, April 19, 2014. Shepherd's wife had a family member killed in the bombing. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Jennifer Walker, center, of Ardmore, Okla., stands at the chair of her father, David Jack Walker, in the Field of Chairs at the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum, following the 17th annual Remembrance Ceremony in Oklahoma City, Thursday, April 19, 2012. With her are her two children, Walker, left, named for her father, and Graecin, right. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
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By KRISTI EATON

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - A key piece of evidence, hundreds of oral testimonies and new artifacts were unveiled Monday at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum dedicated to the deadly 1995 bombing.

The additions are part of a nearly $8 million project that aims to attract a new generation of visitors to the structure, including those too young to remember the attack by Timothy McVeigh on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building that killed 168 people and injured hundreds more.

Detailed information about the investigation of the attack has been added to the museum for the first time. Among the evidence now on display is the 1977 Mercury Grand Marquis that McVeigh was driving when he was pulled over and arrested north of Oklahoma City the day of the bombing.

"People get to see from beginning to end what did happen here in Oklahoma City," said Susan Winchester, the chairwoman of the Oklahoma City National Memorial Foundation, who lost her sister in the blast.

Winchester said victims' family members visited the museum on Sunday and were overwhelmed with the new artifacts and enhanced exhibits.

Patrick Gallagher of Gallagher and Associates, the company planning and implementing the improvements, echoed Winchester, saying the additions will help visitors see the story "come full circle to a justice-served perspective."

On April 19, 1995, McVeigh drove a truck filled with fertilizer and fuel oil to the front of the federal building and detonated the makeshift bomb. He was executed for the crime, while co-conspirator Terry Nichols is serving life in prison.

The enhancements include more than 1,100 new pieces of exhibits, new interactive stations, and video and newspaper coverage.

In one installation, a large map of the United States shows how the bombing reached beyond state lines. One example shows how, before the attack, McVeigh was attending a gun show in Akron, Ohio, while Nichols was committing a robbery in Arkansas.

In another room plays a recording of a water resource board meeting that was taking place the morning of the bombing. The meeting was moving along normally until 9:02 a.m., when an explosion is heard and chaos ensues. A panel then lights up and shows photos of each of the victims killed in the blast.

Emma Dorn, 13, was among a group of seventh-graders touring the revamped museum on Monday. Dorn, who was born six years after the bombing occurred, said she enjoyed watching the videos, looking at the memorabilia and seeing what the building looked like.

The enhancement project, which is 75 percent complete, is expected to be finished by the end of the year.

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