Chinese city creates cellphone sidewalk lane

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Chinese city creates cellphone sidewalk lane
RT @AnupKaphle: Chongqing has introduced sidewalk with two lanes - one allows cell phone and other prohibits. http://t.co/9Oh9r86F44 http:/…
RT @josephstromberg: In Chongqing, China there’s reportedly a sidewalk lane for people staring at their cell phones http://t.co/Qh4P4tovXS …
As part of their Mind Over Masses television show, National Geographic has divided a one block-long sidewalk into two sections; one for cell phone users and the other for those not using a cell phone in downtown Washington, Thursday, July 17, 2014. The walkway warnings were put there by the brains behind a National Geographic television show as part of a behavioral science experiment. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
As part of their Mind Over Masses television show, National Geographic has divided a one block-long sidewalk into two sections; one for cell phone users and the other for those not using a cell phone in downtown Washington, Thursday, July 17, 2014. The walkway warnings were put there by the brains behind a National Geographic television show as part of a behavioral science experiment.(AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
As part of their Mind Over Masses television show, National Geographic has divided a block-long sidewalk into two sections; one for cell phone users and the other for those not using a cell phone in downtown Washington, Thursday, July 17, 2014. The walkway warnings were put there by the brains behind a National Geographic television show as part of a behavioral science experiment.(AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
As part of their Mind Over Masses television show, National Geographic divided a one block-long sidewalk into two sections; one for cell phone users and the other for those not using a cell phone in downtown Washington, Thursday, July 17, 2014. The walkway warnings were put there by the brains behind a National Geographic television show as part of a behavioral science experiment. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
As part of their Mind Over Masses television show, National Geographic has divided a one block-long sidewalk into two sections; one for cell phone users and the other for those not using a cell phone in downtown Washington, Thursday, July 17, 2014. The walkway warnings were put there by the brains behind a National Geographic television show as part of a behavioral science experiment.(AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
FILE - An April 2, 2012 file photo shows an "e-lane" sidewalk graphic displayed in view of City Hall, in Philadelphia. Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter used April Fool's Day to have a little fun with what he says is a real problem: distracted walking. City officials painted lines and oblivious stick-figure pictures on one stretch of John F. Kennedy Boulevard near City Hall as a jab at pedestrians who keep their eyes on their cellphone screens and not their surroundings. Across the country on city streets, in suburban parking lots and in shopping centers, there is usually someone strolling while talking on a phone, texting with their head down, listening to music, or playing a video game. The problem isn't as widely discussed as distracted driving, but the danger is real. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
Pedestrians walk in view of an "e-lane" sidewalk graphic on the sidewalk, Monday, April 2, 2012, in Philadelphia. Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter used April Fool's Day to have a little fun with what he says is a real problem: distracted walking. City officials painted lines and oblivious stick-figure pictures on one stretch of John F. Kennedy Boulevard near City Hall as a jab at pedestrians who keep their eyes on their cellphone screens and not their surroundings. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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By DIDI TANG

BEIJING (AP) -- Taking a cue from an American TV program, the Chinese city of Chongqing has created a smartphone sidewalk lane, offering a path for those too engrossed in messaging and tweeting to watch where they're going.

But the property manager says it's intended to be ironic - to remind people that it's dangerous to tweet while walking the street.

"There are lots of elderly people and children in our street, and walking with your cellphone may cause unnecessary collisions here," said Nong Cheng, the marketing official with Meixin Group, which manages the area in the city's entertainment zone.

Meixin has marked a 50-meter (165-foot) stretch of pavement with two lanes: one that prohibits cellphone use next to one that allows pedestrians to use them - at their "own risk."

Nong said the idea came from a similar stretch of pavement in Washington D.C. created by National Geographic Television in July as part of a behavior experiment.

She said that pedestrians were not taking the new lanes seriously, but that many were snapping pictures of the signs and sidewalk.

"Those using their cellphones of course have not heeded the markings on the pavement," she said. "They don't notice them."

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