Pulitzer-winning cartoonist Tony Auth dies at 72

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Tony Auth cartoonist dead at age 72
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Pulitzer-winning cartoonist Tony Auth dies at 72
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 01: Cartoonist Tony Auth in his office at the Philadelphia Inquirer. (Photo by Ted Thai/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 01: Cartoonist Tony Auth in his office at the Philadelphia Inquirer. (Photo by Ted Thai/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 01: Cartoonist Tony Auth in his office at the Philadelphia Inquirer. (Photo by Ted Thai/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 01: Cartoonist Tony Auth in his office at the Philadelphia Inquirer. (Photo by Ted Thai/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 01: Cartoonist Tony Auth in his office at the Philadelphia Inquirer. (Photo by Ted Thai/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 01: Cartoonist Tony Auth in his office at the Philadelphia Inquirer. (Photo by Ted Thai/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
USA - 2012: Tony Auth illustration of scientist, pope on separate planets; can be used with stories about science vs. faith. (The Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT via Getty Images)
USA - 2012: Tony Auth illustration of don't walk symbol superimposed over sun throwing out solar flares. (The Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT via Getty Images)
USA - 2012: Tony Auth illustration of man touching fingertips with another man on a TV monitor, a la Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel painting; can be used with stories about how people are affected by television advertising. (The Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT via Getty Images)
USA - 2012: Tony Auth illustration of tic-tac-toe board with Xs and a Y. (The Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT via Getty Images)
USA - 2012: Tony Auth illustration of multi-armed alien professor pointing at DNA strand. (The Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT via Getty Images)
USA - 2012: Tony Auth illustration of a giant snake looking like it has just eaten a boy with a boy standing nearby looking like he has just eaten a giant snake. (The Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT via Getty Images)
USA - 2012: Tony Auth illustration of scientist looking through a telescope at the far reaches of the universe, while a person is on their knees with a magnifying glass reading the pages of the book of Genesis in the Bible. (The Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT via Getty Images)
USA - 2012: Tony Auth illustration of old man looking in bathroom mirror at reflection of himself as a muscleman. (The Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT via Getty Images)
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PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist Tony Auth, whose sharp and creative commentary appeared in The Philadelphia Inquirer for more than 40 years, died of cancer on Sunday. He was 72.

Auth had worked for the past two years as the artist-in-residence at NewsWorks/WHYY, which announced his death.

"Tony Auth was a great cartoonist, a fine journalist and an even better friend," said Chris Satullo, WHYY's vice president for news and civic engagement. Satullo previously served as the Inquirer's editorial page editor, where he also worked with Auth.

Family members told the Inquirer that Auth had been battling brain cancer and recently went into hospice care.

Auth worked at the Inquirer for 41 years starting in 1971. He won the Pulitzer for editorial cartoons in 1976 and was a finalist twice after that.

"As a cartoonist, he was a gem - a journalist who could evoke reactions from readers ranging from anger and indignation to elation and illumination," said Inquirer Editor William K. Marimow.

In 2010, the Pulitzer board praised Auth's "masterful simplicity in expressing consistently fearless positions on national and local issues."

He left the Inquirer amid ownership turmoil in 2012 after having covered eight U.S. presidents and seven Philadelphia mayors.

Auth was born in Akron, Ohio, in 1942 and began drawing at age 5 while bedridden with an unspecified illness, according to a biography on his website.

He became a medical illustrator after earning a bachelor's degree in biological illustration from the University of California in Los Angeles in 1965. He began drawing political cartoons on the side for a weekly alternative publication and then for the Daily Bruin, UCLA's campus newspaper.

Auth also illustrated numerous children's books.

He is survived by his wife and two adult children.

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