Powerful Hurricane Odile aims at Mexico's Baja

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Hurricane Odile - last updated 9/16/2014
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Powerful Hurricane Odile aims at Mexico's Baja
People loot a supermarket in San Jose del Cabo, on September 15, 2014 after hurricane Odile knocked down trees and power lines in Mexico's Baja California peninsula. Odile weakened to category two on the five-level Saffir-Simpson scale but still packed powerful winds of 175 kilometers (110 miles) per hour after crashing ashore overnight near Cabo San Lucas, according to the US National Hurricane Center. Some 24,000 foreign tourists and 6,000 Mexican beachgoers spent the night in hotels where conference rooms were transformed into shelters. AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT (Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
People loot a supermarket in San Jose del Cabo, on September 15, 2014 after hurricane Odile knocked down trees and power lines in Mexico's Baja California peninsula. Odile weakened to category two on the five-level Saffir-Simpson scale but still packed powerful winds of 175 kilometers (110 miles) per hour after crashing ashore overnight near Cabo San Lucas, according to the US National Hurricane Center. Some 24,000 foreign tourists and 6,000 Mexican beachgoers spent the night in hotels where conference rooms were transformed into shelters. AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT (Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
People loot a supermarket in San Jose del Cabo, on September 15, 2014 after hurricane Odile knocked down trees and power lines in Mexico's Baja California peninsula. Odile weakened to category two on the five-level Saffir-Simpson scale but still packed powerful winds of 175 kilometers (110 miles) per hour after crashing ashore overnight near Cabo San Lucas, according to the US National Hurricane Center. Some 24,000 foreign tourists and 6,000 Mexican beachgoers spent the night in hotels where conference rooms were transformed into shelters. AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT (Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
A girl covers herself with a towel as rain falls in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile grew into a major storm Sunday and took aim at the resort area of Los Cabos, prompting Mexican authorities to evacuate vulnerable coastal areas and prepare shelters for up to 30,000 people. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A kid walks by a souvenir store damaged by Hurricane Odile on San Lucas' main street, in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile hammered Mexico's Baja California Peninsula overnight, damaging homes and tearing away the facades of luxury resorts, shattering countless car and hotel windows and leaving lobbies swamped and full of debris on Monday. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Tourist Carl Hassler from California looks at debris and damaged furniture at the entrance of the Hilton hotel after it sustained severe damage cuased by Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile blazed a trail of destruction through Mexico's Baja California Peninsula that leveled everything from ramshackle homes to big box stores and luxury hotels, leaving roads and entire neighborhoods as disaster zones. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Mexican soldiers try to stop people from looting a convenience store destroyed by Hurricane Odile, in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. The storm, which made landfall near Cabo San Lucas the previous night as a powerful Category 3 hurricane, toppled trees, power poles and road signs along the main highway, which at one point was swamped by rushing floodwaters. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
People salvage the useful remains from houses destroyed by Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hundreds for impoverished housed were destroyed in the Unidad Real land invasion and other equally poor neighborhoods. Mexico’s Interior Ministry declared a state of natural disaster for affected areas in the state of Baja California Sur. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Enrique Cota Ceceña shows to reporters what remains of his belongings after his house was severely damaged by flood waters from Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile blazed a trail of destruction through Mexico's Baja California Peninsula that leveled everything from ramshackle homes to big box stores and luxury hotels, leaving roads and entire neighborhoods as disaster zones. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Tourist Cesar Calzada, center, of Mexico City, climbs over a fence of the Riu resort to get out of the hotel and go search for food after Hurricane Odile severely damaged the hotel in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile blazed a trail of destruction through Mexico's Baja California Peninsula that leveled everything from ramshackle homes to big box stores and luxury hotels, leaving roads and entire neighborhoods as disaster zones. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A family from San Jose, California, cover themselves with pillows as they sit on the concrete stairs in the service area of a resort after the designated area for shelter was destroyed by winds in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile raked the Baja California Peninsula with strong winds and heavy rains early Monday as locals and tourists in the resort area of Los Cabos began to emerge from shelters and assess the damage. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A woman carries a sheet afte hurricane Odile caused destruction in Cabo San Lucas, in Mexico's Baja California peninsula, on September 15, 2014. Odile weakened to category two on the five-level Saffir-Simpson scale but still packed powerful winds of 175 kilometers (110 miles) per hour after crashing ashore overnight near Cabo San Lucas, according to the US National Hurricane Center. Some 24,000 foreign tourists and 6,000 Mexican beachgoers spent the night in hotels where conference rooms were transformed into shelters. AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT (Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
People loot a supermarket in San Jose del Cabo, on September 15, 2014 after hurricane Odile knocked down trees and power lines in Mexico's Baja California peninsula. Odile weakened to category two on the five-level Saffir-Simpson scale but still packed powerful winds of 175 kilometers (110 miles) per hour after crashing ashore overnight near Cabo San Lucas, according to the US National Hurricane Center. Some 24,000 foreign tourists and 6,000 Mexican beachgoers spent the night in hotels where conference rooms were transformed into shelters. AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT (Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
View of cars stranded in a flooded street in San Jose del Cabo, on September 15, 2014 after hurricane Odile knocked down trees and power lines in Mexico's Baja California peninsula. Odile weakened to category two on the five-level Saffir-Simpson scale but still packed powerful winds of 175 kilometers (110 miles) per hour after crashing ashore overnight near Cabo San Lucas, according to the US National Hurricane Center. Some 24,000 foreign tourists and 6,000 Mexican beachgoers spent the night in hotels where conference rooms were transformed into shelters. AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT (Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
A room sits partially destroyed at the Hilton hotel after the resort sustained severe damage by Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile blazed a trail of destruction through Mexico's Baja California Peninsula that leveled everything from ramshackle homes to big box stores and luxury hotels, leaving roads and entire neighborhoods as disaster zones. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Tourist Patrick Egan from California looks at the interior patios of the Hilton hotel, damaged by Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile blazed a trail of destruction through Mexico's Baja California Peninsula that leveled everything from ramshackle homes to big box stores and luxury hotels, leaving roads and entire neighborhoods as disaster zones. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
NOAA 5-day project path for Hurricane Odile.
People salvage the useful remains from houses destroyed by Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hundreds for impoverished housed were destroyed in the Unidad Real land invasion and other equally poor neighborhoods. Mexico’s Interior Ministry declared a state of natural disaster for affected areas in the state of Baja California Sur. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Cars parked next to an office supplies store partially destroyed by Hurricane Odile, in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. The storm, which made landfall near Cabo San Lucas the previous night as a powerful Category 3 hurricane, toppled trees, power poles and road signs along the main highway, which at one point was swamped by rushing floodwaters. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Raimundo Diaz Cruz, right, and his son, also named Raimundo Diaz, 17, salvage wood beans and bricks to rebuild their house after it was destroyed by Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hundreds for impoverished housed were destroyed in the Unidad Real land invasion and other equally poor neighborhoods. Mexico’s Interior Ministry declared a state of natural disaster for affected areas in the state of Baja California Sur. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A young man carries several packs of beer from a convenience store destroyed by Hurricane Odile as Mexican soldiers try to stop people from looting in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile hammered Mexico's Baja California Peninsula overnight, damaging homes and tearing away the facades of luxury resorts, shattering countless car and hotel windows and leaving lobbies swamped and full of debris on Monday. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A man walks on a street where most power lines and light posts have been knocked down by Hurricane Odile, in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. The storm, which made landfall near Cabo San Lucas the previous night as a powerful Category 3 hurricane, toppled trees, power poles and road signs along the main highway, which at one point was swamped by rushing floodwaters. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A woman looks at what remains of her house after it was destroyed by Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hundreds for impoverished housed were destroyed in the Unidad Real land invasion and other equally poor neighborhoods. Mexico’s Interior Ministry declared a state of natural disaster for affected areas in the state of Baja California Sur. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
People cross a flooded creek in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile hammered Mexico's Baja California Peninsula overnight, damaging homes and tearing away the facades of luxury resorts, shattering countless car and hotel windows and leaving lobbies swamped and full of debris on Monday. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A man looks at a destroyed convenience store trashed by Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile hammered Mexico's Baja California Peninsula overnight, tearing away the facades of luxury resorts, shattering countless car and hotel windows and leaving lobbies swamped and full of debris on Monday. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A man walks by the designated area for shelter at a resort which was destroyed by Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile hammered Mexico's Baja California Peninsula overnight, tearing away the facades of luxury resorts, shattering countless car and hotel windows and leaving lobbies swamped and full of debris on Monday. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A tourist from England walks by rental cars, partially destroyed by Hurricane Odile, near a resort in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile hammered Mexico's Baja California Peninsula overnight, tearing away the facades of luxury resorts, shattering countless car and hotel windows and leaving lobbies swamped and full of debris on Monday. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A car drives by a gas station partially destroyed by Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. The storm, which made landfall near Cabo San Lucas the previous night as a powerful Category 3 hurricane, toppled trees, power poles and road signs along the main highway, which at one point was swamped by rushing floodwaters. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A woman takes goods from inside a destroyed convenience store trashed by Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile hammered Mexico's Baja California Peninsula overnight, tearing away the facades of luxury resorts, shattering countless car and hotel windows and leaving lobbies swamped and full of debris on Monday. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this natural-color view of the storm at about 12 p.m. local time on September 14, when it was still southeast of the Baja California peninsula.
NOAA satellite loop of Hurricane Odile moving up the Baja Peninsula on Monday morning, September 15, 2014.
Tourists walks near the entrance of the resort, partially destroyed by Hurricane Odile, in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile hammered Mexico's Baja California Peninsula overnight, tearing away the facades of luxury resorts, shattering countless car and hotel windows and leaving lobbies swamped and full of debris on Monday. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A woman talks on the phone next to a destroyed convenience store trashed by Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. The storm, which made landfall near Cabo San Lucas the previous night as a powerful Category 3 hurricane, toppled trees, power poles and road signs along the main highway, which at one point was swamped by rushing floodwaters. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A car drives by a gas station partially destroyed by Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. The storm, which made landfall near Cabo San Lucas the previous night as a powerful Category 3 hurricane, toppled trees, power poles and road signs along the main highway, which at one point was swamped by rushing floodwaters. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A tourist from England walks by rental cars, partially destroyed by Hurricane Odile, near a resort in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile hammered Mexico's Baja California Peninsula overnight, tearing away the facades of luxury resorts, shattering countless car and hotel windows and leaving lobbies swamped and full of debris on Monday. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A woman takes goods from inside a destroyed convenience store trashed by Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile hammered Mexico's Baja California Peninsula overnight, tearing away the facades of luxury resorts, shattering countless car and hotel windows and leaving lobbies swamped and full of debris on Monday. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Tourists sit on the concrete stairs in the service area of a resort after the designated area for shelter was destroyed by winds in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile raked the Baja California Peninsula with strong winds and heavy rains early Monday as locals and tourists in the resort area of Los Cabos began to emerge from shelters and assess the damage. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A Mexican family with their 2-year old toddler rests inside a room in the service area of a resort after the designated area for shelter was destroyed by winds in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile raked the Baja California Peninsula with strong winds and heavy rains early Monday as locals and tourists in the resort area of Los Cabos began to emerge from shelters and assess the damage. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
The designated area for shelter at a resort lays partially destroyed by winds in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile raked the Baja California Peninsula with strong winds and heavy rains early Monday as locals and tourists in the resort area of Los Cabos began to emerge from shelters and assess the damage. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Tourists sit on the concrete stairs in the service area of a resort after the designated area for shelter was destroyed by winds in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Hurricane Odile raked the Baja California Peninsula with strong winds and heavy rains early Monday as locals and tourists in the resort area of Los Cabos began to emerge from shelters and assess the damage. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Tourists rest inside a shelter at a resort in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile is expected to make a close brush with the southern portion of Mexico's Baja California peninsula Sunday evening. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
#odile
#Odile just 1 of the 3 hallways flooded with water on the way to the staff bathroom.
There's the roof tile that smashed my window #odile
#odile aftermath
#Odile staff locker room ceiling
Make shift beds in the hallway #Odile
We're in the eye. #odile
This satellite image provided by NOAA shows category four Hurricane Odile taken at 5:45 a.m. EDT Sunday Sept. 14, 2014. The rapidly strengthening Hurricane Odile intensified Saturday night and appeared headed for a possible close brush with the southern end of Mexico's Baja California peninsula. At 5 a.m. EDT Odile had maximum sustained winds of 135 mph and was moving north-northwest at 15 mph. (AP Photo/NOAA)
Residents, Tourists Sent to Shelters as Hurricane Odile Makes Landfall - ABC News http://t.co/VSWndfklmh via @ABC http://t.co/MADJec7nQq
A view of empty street in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California State, Mexico, on September 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile swirled menacingly toward Mexico's Los Cabos resorts on Sunday, forcing authorities to evacuate high-risk areas and open shelters as the powerful storm threatened to thrash the Pacific coast. AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT (Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
Hurricane Odile makes landfall on Mexican coast https://t.co/l7tkAc2CTp http://t.co/s0oPQ8GQDf
Large waves generated by powerful Hurricane #Odile pound Cabo San Lucas, Mexico - WATCH: http://t.co/kPU4Kv6Elk http://t.co/fcsvQojTpJ
People watch waves in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California State, Mexico, on September 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile swirled menacingly toward Mexico's Los Cabos resorts on Sunday, forcing authorities to evacuate high-risk areas and open shelters as the powerful storm threatened to thrash the Pacific coast. AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT (Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
People watch waves in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California State, Mexico, on September 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile swirled menacingly toward Mexico's Los Cabos resorts on Sunday, forcing authorities to evacuate high-risk areas and open shelters as the powerful storm threatened to thrash the Pacific coast. AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT (Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
A child eats a piece of bread as families rest in school-turned shelter after being evacuated from their homes in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile is expected to make a close brush with the southern portion of Mexico's Baja California peninsula Sunday evening. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Children watch a movie on their laptop as tourists rest inside a shelter at a resort in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile is expected to make a close brush with the southern portion of Mexico's Baja California peninsula Sunday evening. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Tourists rest inside a shelter at a resort in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile is expected to make a close brush with the southern portion of Mexico's Baja California peninsula Sunday evening. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Winds blow palm trees on the beach in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile turned into a Category 4 hurricane and it's expected to make a close brush with the southern portion of Mexico's Baja California peninsula Sunday evening. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Families wait in a bus to be evacuated from their homes in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile grew into a major storm Sunday and took aim at the resort area of Los Cabos, prompting Mexican authorities to evacuate vulnerable coastal areas and prepare shelters for up to 30,000 people. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A family evacuates their home in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile grew into a major storm Sunday and took aim at the resort area of Los Cabos, prompting Mexican authorities to evacuate vulnerable coastal areas and prepare shelters for up to 30,000 people. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Hurricane Odile approaches Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile turned into a Category 4 hurricane and it's expected to make a close brush with the southern portion of Mexico's Baja California peninsula Sunday evening. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
People take photos of the sea in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile grew into a major storm Sunday and took aim at the resort area of Los Cabos, prompting Mexican authorities to evacuate vulnerable coastal areas and prepare shelters for up to 30,000 people. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Tourists stand in line to reschedule their flights at Los Cabos' airport, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile grew into a major storm Sunday and took aim at the resort area of Los Cabos, prompting Mexican authorities to evacuate vulnerable coastal areas and prepare shelters for up to 30,000 people. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Waves hit the coast of Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile grew into a major storm Sunday and took aim at the resort area of Los Cabos, prompting Mexican authorities to evacuate vulnerable coastal areas and prepare shelters for up to 30,000 people. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Waves hit the coast of Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile turned into a Category 4 hurricane and it's expected to make a close brush with the southern portion of Mexico's Baja California peninsula Sunday evening. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A man takes photos of the sea as waves hit the coast of Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile grew into a major storm Sunday and took aim at the resort area of Los Cabos, prompting Mexican authorities to evacuate vulnerable coastal areas and prepare shelters for up to 30,000 people. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A girl covers herself with a towel as rain falls in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile grew into a major storm Sunday and took aim at the resort area of Los Cabos, prompting Mexican authorities to evacuate vulnerable coastal areas and prepare shelters for up to 30,000 people. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Tourists watch the ocean from inside a swimming pool at a resort in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile turned into a Category 4 hurricane and it's expected to make a close brush with the southern portion of Mexico's Baja California peninsula Sunday evening. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Workers put plastic shields on windows at resort as they prepare for the arrival of Hurricane Odile in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile turned into a Category 4 hurricane and it's expected to make a close brush with the southern portion of Mexico's Baja California peninsula Sunday evening. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Tourists take photos of the ocean at a resort in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile turned into a Category 4 hurricane and it's expected to make a close brush with the southern portion of Mexico's Baja California peninsula Sunday evening. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
A man takes a photo from the roof of a house at a resort in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile turned into a Category 4 hurricane and it's expected to make a close brush with the southern portion of Mexico's Baja California peninsula Sunday evening. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Tourists watch the ocean from inside a swimming pool at a resort in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile turned into a Category 4 hurricane and it's expected to make a close brush with the southern portion of Mexico's Baja California peninsula Sunday evening. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Naples, UNITED STATES: Thierry (L) and Odile (R) Grounin, residents of Naples, Florida, sit and drink coffee at a partially boarded up coffee cafe, 23 October, 2005, in Naples, ahead of Hurricane Wilma. The Grounins, originally from France, decided not to evacuate Naples and will ride out the storm and help look after a neighbor who lives alone. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
View of waves in San Jose del Cabo, Baja California State, Mexico, on September 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile swirled menacingly toward Mexico's Los Cabos resorts on Sunday, leading authorities to evacuate high-risk areas and open shelters as the powerful storm threatened to thrash the Pacific coast. AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT (Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
View of waves in San Jose del Cabo, Baja California State, Mexico, on September 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile swirled menacingly toward Mexico's Los Cabos resorts on Sunday, leading authorities to evacuate high-risk areas and open shelters as the powerful storm threatened to thrash the Pacific coast. AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT (Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
People gather in a shelter in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California State, Mexico, on September 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile swirled menacingly toward Mexico's Los Cabos resorts on Sunday, forcing authorities to evacuate high-risk areas and open shelters as the powerful storm threatened to thrash the Pacific coast. AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT (Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
People make preparation for the hurricane Odile in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California State, Mexico, on September 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile swirled menacingly toward Mexico's Los Cabos resorts on Sunday, forcing authorities to evacuate high-risk areas and open shelters as the powerful storm threatened to thrash the Pacific coast. AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT (Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
People gather in a shelter in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California State, Mexico, on September 14, 2014. Hurricane Odile swirled menacingly toward Mexico's Los Cabos resorts on Sunday, forcing authorities to evacuate high-risk areas and open shelters as the powerful storm threatened to thrash the Pacific coast. AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT (Photo credit should read RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
Strong #hurricane hits Mexico's Baja California Peninsula. Regram via @tylergaglia #odile
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By IGNACIO MARTINEZ DE JESUS and ALBA MORA ROCA

CABO SAN LUCAS, Mexico (AP) - A powerful Hurricane Odile bore down on the resort area of Los Cabos on Sunday, prompting Mexican authorities to evacuate vulnerable coastal areas and prepare shelters for up to 30,000 people.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami said Odile's core was on a track to pass close to or directly over the south end of Baja California late Sunday and into Monday and move by the southern portion of the peninsula on Tuesday.

Rain began falling at midafternoon, hours before the storm's expected arrival. Gusty winds whipped palm trees, waves pounded the rocky shore and fluttering black flags signaled that beaches were closed due to high surf.

Odile's maximum sustained winds were 125 (205 kph) late Sunday afternoon, down a bit from earlier in the day. Its center was about 90 miles (145 kilometers) south-southeast of the southern tip of Baja California and was moving to the north-northwest at 16 mph (26 kph).

David Korenfeld, director of Mexico's National Water Commission, described Odile as "highly dangerous."

After reaching Category 4 strength Sunday, Odile was downgraded to Category 3. But it was still a major storm that threatened to bring high winds, deadly surf and heavy rains to Baja and parts of the mainland, and forecasters said it could strengthen again as it approached land.

Some 800 marines were on standby, and officials readied heavy equipment to help out in areas where mudslides could occur. Police with megaphones walked through vulnerable areas in Cabo San Lucas urging neighbors to evacuate.

"I'm leaving. It's very dangerous here," said Felipa Flores, clutching a plastic bag with a few belongings as she took her two small children from her neighborhood of El Caribe to a storm shelter. "Later on we're going to be cut off and my house of wood and laminated cardboard won't stand up to much."

Long lines formed at gas stations and supermarkets as residents stocked up on food, bottled water, flashlights and batteries.

Some went to the shore to take photos and video of the ocean as the waves picked up and the skies darkened.

At least 22 airline flights were canceled, and some tourists said they were stranded. Others at the Los Cabos international airport were trying to leave before conditions got too bad.

"Hopefully we can still leave here and get out before the hurricane strikes," said Paul Aguilar, a visitor from Riverside, California, with a marked sunglasses tan line around his eyes.

Luis Felipe Puente, national coordinator for Mexico's civil protection agency, said 164 shelters had been prepared for as many as 30,000 people in the state of Baja California Sur. He said occupancy in hotels was low, but tourists were warned to stay inside in the safer areas of the hotels and keep away from doors and windows.

Hotel officials distributed movies and board games to guests in anticipation of everyone having to hunker down inside later in the day. Workers put protective plastic sheeting over windows. Guests were advised to have their bags packed and passports at the ready.

Ann Montalvo, a tourist from California staying at the Westin resort, said hotel workers seemed to be taking the right steps to ensure guests' safety, and she wasn't worried.

"I live in the San Francisco area where we have earthquakes, so we're always kind of on our toes anyway," Montalvo said.

Besides being powerful, Odile was also a large storm.

The hurricane center said hurricane-force winds extended outward from the center up to 50 miles (85 kilometers) and tropical storm-force winds as far as 185 miles (295 kilometers).

It warned that a dangerous storm surge could produce coastal flooding accompanied by large, destructive waves. Rainfall of 5 to 10 inches was expected, along with isolated amounts up to 15 inches.

A hurricane warning was in effect for Baja California Sur from Punta Abreojos to La Paz. Mexican authorities declared a maximum alert for areas in or near Odile's path, and ports in Baja California were to remain closed.

Korenfeld said there was also a chance the storm could track into the Gulf of California, also known as the Sea of Cortez, and as a precaution authorities were on high alert.

In the central Atlantic, Tropical Storm Edouard strengthened into a hurricane with sustained winds of 85 mph (140 kph), although it was expected to remain far out at sea and pose no threat to land.

The U.S. hurricane center said Edouard's center was 860 miles (1,385 kilometers) northeast of the northern Leeward Islands and was moving northwest at 14 mph (22 kph).

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