See how America reacted to President Obama's primetime speech

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The map above shows how America responded to President Barack Obama's Wednesday night speech about plans to take down the Islamic State.

This visualization was created using raw Twitter data from just before, during and after the president's address. It shows when people used specific terms related to the speech on the social network.

The map is moveable and zoomable. It can also be panned out to show the entire world.

There is notably almost no response on Twitter to the speech from the Middle East, a surprising development given how active the Islamic State is on social media.

Obama addressed the nation on the eve of the 13th anniversary of 9/11 in a speech panned by some, loved by others, but talked about by many.

The president denounced the terrorists responsible for the beheadings of two American journalists and the rape, torture and murder of many others.

"Our objective is clear: we will degrade, and ultimately destroy, ISIL through a comprehensive and sustained counter-terrorism strategy," he said.

Obama insisted that there would be no mass invasion of ISIS-held territory, that this mission could be completed through a series of airstrikes.

"It will not involve American combat troops fighting on foreign soil," said the president, before admitting 457 additional troops would be sent into Iraq.

Obama also spoke of a "broad coalition" that would join the U.S. in the fight against the terror group, but did not name any partners as then-President Bush famously did during his address to the nation in the days after the 9/11 terror attacks.

British Prime Minister David Cameron has previously spoken of his air force acting in a support role for military operations in the region.

Obama's War On ISIS

Related links:
Obama to launch airstrikes in Syria for first time
Analysis: Obama takes big risk in wider airstrikes
New terror fight casts shadow over 9/11 ceremonies
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