'There's no control': Hawaii watches lava's creep

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Hawaii Volcano Kilauea
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'There's no control': Hawaii watches lava's creep
PAHOA, HAWAII - OCTOBER 28: In this handout provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), A portion of the front of the June 27th lava flow pushes through a fence marking a property boundary on October 28, 2014 in Pahoa, Hawaii. Scientists of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory conducted ground and air observations of the lava flow from the Kilauea Volcano and determined that it was 510 meters (560 yards) upslope from Pa-hoa Village Road and the flow width was about 50 meters (55 yards) at the leading edge. Molten rock from the flow is inching its way towards homes in the town of Pahoa on Hawaii's Big Island where close to a thousand people live. (Photo by USGS via Getty Images)
PAHOA, HAWAII - OCTOBER 28: In this handout provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), A portion of the front of the June 27th lava flow pushes through a fence marking a property boundary on October 28, 2014 in Pahoa, Hawaii. Scientists of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory conducted ground and air observations of the lava flow from the Kilauea Volcano and determined that it was 510 meters (560 yards) upslope from Pa-hoa Village Road and the flow width was about 50 meters (55 yards) at the leading edge. Molten rock from the flow is inching its way towards homes in the town of Pahoa on Hawaii's Big Island where close to a thousand people live. (Photo by USGS via Getty Images)
In this Sept. 3, 2014 photo released by the U.S. Geological Survey, fluid lava streams from the June 27 lava flow from the Kilauea volcano in Pahoa, Hawaii. The June 27 lava flow is named for the date it began erupting from a new vent. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory issued a warning Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014 to a rural community in the path of a lava flow on Hawaii's Big Island, as the molten rock moved to within a mile of homes. Observatory scientists said lava from the Kilauea volcano could reach the Kaohe Homesteads in five to seven days if it continues advancing through cracks in the earth. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)
In this Sept. 1, 2014 photo released by the U.S. Geological Survey, fluid lava streams from the June 27 lava flow from the Kilauea volcano in Pahoa, Hawaii. The June 27 lava flow is named for the date it began erupting from a new vent. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory issued a warning Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014 to a rural community in the path of a lava flow on Hawaii's Big Island, as the molten rock moved to within a mile of homes. Observatory scientists said lava from the Kilauea volcano could reach the Kaohe Homesteads in five to seven days if it continues advancing through cracks in the earth. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)
In this Sept. 1, 2014 photo released by the U.S. Geological Survey, fluid lava streams from the June 27 lava flow from the Kilauea volcano in Pahoa, Hawaii. The June 27 lava flow is named for the date it began erupting from a new vent. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory issued a warning Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014 to a rural community in the path of a lava flow on Hawaii's Big Island, as the molten rock moved to within a mile of homes. Observatory scientists said lava from the Kilauea volcano could reach the Kaohe Homesteads in five to seven days if it continues advancing through cracks in the earth. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)
In this Aug. 29, 2014 photo released by the U.S. Geological Survey, fluid lava streams from the June 27 lava flow from the Kilauea volcano in Pahoa, Hawaii. The June 27 lava flow is named for the date it began erupting from a new vent. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory issued a warning Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014 to a rural community in the path of a lava flow on Hawaii's Big Island, as the molten rock moved to within a mile of homes. Observatory scientists said lava from the Kilauea volcano could reach the Kaohe Homesteads in five to seven days if it continues advancing through cracks in the earth. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)
This Aug. 22, 2014 photo released by the U.S. Geological Survey shows the Pu'u 'O'o crater of the Kilauea volcano partially obscured by thick fume from the June 27 lava flow near Pahoa, Hawaii. The June 27 lava flow, named for the date it began erupting from a new vent, isn't an immediate threat to homes or structures downhill of the flow, but could become one in weeks or months if it continues to advance, the U.S. Geographical Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey, Tim Orr)
This Aug. 12, 2014 photo released by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a fluid lava stream within the main tube of the June 27 lava flow from the Kilauea volcano Pahoa, Hawaii. The June 27 lava flow, named for the date it began erupting from a new vent, isn't an immediate threat to homes or structures downhill of the flow, but could become one in weeks or months if it continues to advance, the U.S. Geographical Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)
In this photo provided by the US Geological Survey, taken Saturday, March 5, 2011, Incandescent rubble is shown rolling down the scarp of Pu'u O'o crater near Volcano, Hawaii. Scientists are monitoring a new vent that has opened at the Kilauea volcano, sending lava shooting up to 65 feet high. (AP Photo/US Geological Survey)
Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. Cool to see what earth must have been once. http://t.co/p2SQ2XuEJE
Paddling near to a volcano. The Kilauea is throwing lava into the ocean since 1983. Photo by AleSocci http://t.co/jrVKdEIthm
#Hawaii mayor declares state of emergency as lava from #Kilauea volcano flows towards homes http://t.co/kkBSBPG2Bw http://t.co/qTsXIPhOKj
Lava flowing from Hawaii volcano http://t.co/ie6XNHobao http://t.co/wcMWCazvjJ
Lava is crawling inch-by-inch towards a Hawaii rural community, but there's no evacuation yet. http://t.co/s4zfLppubS http://t.co/fEe6em3sNf
Map locates Kilauea volcano in Hawaii.; 2c x 3 inches; 96.3 mm x 76 mm;
BIG ISLAND, HAWAII - APRIL 6. EXCLUSIVE: Pahoehoe lava is entering the sea during the day from Kilauea volcano on April, 6, 2005 in Hawaii. German electrical engineer Martin Rietze specialises in astronomical and meteorological equipment, his work takes him to strange environments such as the Arctic and volcanos around the world. As a lover of photography Martin always documents his trip with pictures and noticed how alien landscapes can look despite being here on earth. Martin has produced a stunning set of images entitled Alien Landscapes on Planet Earth which he hopes one day will form a book. (Photo by Martin Rietze / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
BIG ISLAND, HAWAII - APRIL 6. EXCLUSIVE: Pahoehoe lava is entering the sea at dawn time from Kilauea volcano on April, 6, 2005 in Hawaii. German electrical engineer Martin Rietze specialises in astronomical and meteorological equipment, his work takes him to strange environments such as the Arctic and volcanos around the world. As a lover of photography Martin always documents his trip with pictures and noticed how alien landscapes can look despite being here on earth. Martin has produced a stunning set of images entitled Alien Landscapes on Planet Earth which he hopes one day will form a book. (Photo by Martin Rietze / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - CIRCA 2003: Eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (UNESCO World Heritage List, 1987), Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, United States of America. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
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By AUDREY McAVOY and JENNIFER SINCO KELLEHER
Associated Press

PAHOA, Hawaii (AP) -- Lava from one of the world's most active volcanos has been advancing at a slower pace the past few days and is now moving parallel to a sparsely populated subdivision on Hawaii's Big Island.

Lava from Kilauea volcano was still at least a mile from any homes in Kaohe Homesteads, Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira said.

Oliveira took a helicopter flight over the area Monday and saw the lava had crept about 150 yards from the previous day. It's moving north for now but could still stop or change directions.

"It's been doing that for the last several days," he said of its northern pull. Prior to Friday, it was going northeast toward the subdivision.

Puna Residents Still Bracing for Lava Flow

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has warned the lava could reach the subdivision in a matter of days.

Oliveira said he didn't anticipate issuing an evacuation order Monday. But residents should be prepared because it's difficult to predict the lava's movement. It was also raining over the flow site, he noted, which meant there wasn't a wildfire threat.

"That's good for today," he said. "But it doesn't get us out of any potential threat down the road. It just means it's going to be a very slow process."

The lava warning has created an "edgy" mood in Puna, the rural region on the southeast side of the Big Island that is at risk from the lava, said Bill Parecki, a real estate agent who has lived in the area for 42 years. The area is still recovering from the damage from a tropical storm about a month ago.

"Everybody's a little concerned," he said. "Everybody's a little worried. We just have to see where the lava goes. There's no control. It's Mother Nature."

A big concern is lava crossing roads and blocking Puna off from the rest of the island, or becoming "lava-locked," he said.

Business has been quiet since Tropical Storm Iselle made landfall over the region last month, said Mary Bicknell, owner of Big Island Book Buyers, a bookstore in downtown Pahoa.

"We're always watching it, but we're not usually threatened by it," she said of the lava.

Also unlock the mysteries of North Korea's volcano:

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North Korea volcano
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'There's no control': Hawaii watches lava's creep
In this Wednesday, June 18, 2014 photo, clouds float over the peak of Mt. Paektu in North Korea's Ryanggang province. More than a thousand years ago, a huge volcano straddling the border between North Korea and China was the site of one of the biggest eruptions in human history, blanketing eastern Asia in its ash. But unlike other major volcanos around the world, the remote and politically sensitive Mount Paektu remains almost a complete mystery to foreign scientists who have - until recently - been unable to conduct on-site studies. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)
In this Wednesday, June 18, 2014 photo, a North Korean woman walks on the peak of Mt. Paektu in North Korea's Ryanggang province. More than a thousand years ago, a huge volcano straddling the border between North Korea and China was the site of one of the biggest eruptions in human history, blanketing eastern Asia in its ash. But unlike other major volcanos around the world, the remote and politically sensitive Mount Paektu remains almost a complete mystery to foreign scientists who have - until recently - been unable to conduct on-site studies. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)
In this Wednesday, June 18, 2014 photo, a North Korean national television station camera crew records the scenery from the peak of Mt. Paektu in North Korea's Ryanggang province. More than a thousand years ago, a huge volcano straddling the border between North Korea and China was the site of one of the biggest eruptions in human history, blanketing eastern Asia in its ash. But unlike other major volcanos around the world, the remote and politically sensitive Mount Paektu remains almost a complete mystery to foreign scientists who have - until recently - been unable to conduct on-site studies. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)
Images of the late North Korean leader Kim Il Sung and Mt. Paektu appear on a screen behind a choir during a concert in Pyongyang on Monday April 16, 2012 to commemorate 100 years since the birth of Kim Il Sung. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)
A North Korean village is blanketed by snow near Rimyongsu Falls at the base of Mt. Paektu, North Korea on Wednesday April 4, 2012. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)
In this Monday, April 2, 2012 photo, a female North Korean soldier, working as a guide, enters what was a secret military camp during the fight against the Japanese and the site of what North Koreans say is the home of the late North Korean leader Kim Il Sung and the birthplace of his son and late leader Kim Jong Il at the foot of Mount Paektu, North Korea. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)
[UNVERIFIED CONTENT] Soldier on Mount Paektu North Korea overlooking Lake Chon.
MT. BAEKTU, NORTH KOREA - SEPTEMBER 2011: Mt. Baektu on the North Korea/China border. (Photo by Mark Edward Harris/Getty Images)
RIMYONGSU FALLS, NORTH KOREA - SEPTEMBER 2011: Rimyongsu Falls near the base of Mt. Baektu in North Korea. (Photo by Mark Edward Harris/Getty Images)
MT. BAEKTU, NORTH KOREA - SEPTEMBER 2011: Soldiers on Mt. Baektu near the North Korea/China border. (Photo by Mark Edward Harris/Getty Images)
NORTH KOREA - MAY 03: Monument in front of mount Paektu in Samiyon, North Korea on May 03, 2010. (Photo by Eric LAFFORGUE/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
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