Former New Orleans mayor to start 10-year sentence for graft

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

90 PHOTOS
Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina
See Gallery
Former New Orleans mayor to start 10-year sentence for graft
WASHINGTON - SEPTEMBER 23: New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin testifies on Capitol Hill on September 23, 2008 in Washington, DC. Mayor Nagin spoke about his city's recovery from Hurricane Katrina as well as its recent experience with hurricanes Gustav and Ike. Officials from the Gulf area were on Capitol Hill requesting lawmakers for federal funding to aid in recovery efforts for over $14 billion worth of damage after the two recent hurricanes devastated the region. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
In this image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a National Weather Service color-enhanced radar image shows the outer bands of Hurricane Katrina, ashore on the northern Gulf coast and the center of the storm about 80 miles to the south of the Louisiana coast at 12 a.m. CT on Monday, Aug. 29, 2005. (AP Photo/NOAA)
Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin leaves federal court after being sentenced in New Orleans, Wednesday, July 9, 2014. Nagin was sentenced to 10 years in prison for bribery, money laundering and other corruption that spanned his two terms as mayor, including the chaotic years after Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005. He was convicted Feb. 12 of accepting hundreds of thousands of dollars from businessmen who wanted work from the city or Nagin's support for various projects. The bribes came in the form of money, free vacations and truckloads of free granite for his family business. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
USA Louisiana New Orleans
FEMA 15022
Aerial view of massive flooding and destruction caused by Hurricane Katrina September 7, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
Shrimp boats piled up on a bridge blocking the highway almost 60 days after Hurricane Katrina devastated the area October 25, 2005 in Empire, LA.
www.alamy.com
Aerial view of massive flooding and destruction scattering cars in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 2, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
Aerial view of massive flooding and destruction caused by Hurricane Katrina including a broken retaining wall part of a levee September 7, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
www.alamy.com
Downtown New Orleans skyline and the flooded Tulane Ave offramp from I-10 as rescue use the ramp for a boat ramp for their emergency search and rescue operations in New Orleans, La on Sept. 11, 2005.(AP Photo/Mark Saltz/STR)
www.alamy.com
Barber Shop located in Ninth Ward, New Orleans, Louisiana, damaged by Hurricane Katrina in 2005
A group of tourists walk with their luggage through downtown New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many residents remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remain in the city awaiting a way out. Many visitors were stranded in hotels without a way to leave the city. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
View of massive flooding and destruction in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 6, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
View of massive flooding and destruction in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 6, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
www.alamy.com
Residents wait to be rescued from the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005 in New Orleans. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, Pool)
Residents wait on a roof top to be rescued from the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005 in New Orleans. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Residents wait to be rescued from the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005 in New Orleans. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip,Pool)
Residents wait on a rooftop to be rescued from the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005 in New Orleans. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, Pool)
President Bush meets New Orleans mayor C. Ray Nagin, left, following a news conference at the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport, Friday, Sept. 2, 2005. Bush is touring the Gulf Coast communities battered by Hurricane Katrina, hoping to boost the spirits of increasingly desperate storm victims and exhausted rescuers. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Katrina
Keeping Watch: A Coastie keeps a sharp lookout from a helicopter over flooded New Orleans
FEMA Urban Search & Rescue teams carry and injured elderly man to an evacuation helicopter in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 1, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
Survivors rescued by FEMA urban search and rescue teams in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
Survivors being evacuated at New Orleans Airport to other states in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 1, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
Emergency medical workers help evacuate John Dodd from his home in Bay St. Louis, Miss., on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2005. Rescue workers were searching the area for people in homes that had been affected by Hurricane Katrina. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
An elderly couple walk up the ramp to the Superdome after being rescued from their flooded home as the city is evacuated due to hurricane Katrina August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
Survivors rescued by urban search and rescue on an airboat in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
Thousand of people displaced by Hurricane Katrina await buses to depart the Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana Sept. 2, 2005. Hundreds more people were rescued as waters continue to rise in the flood ravaged city. (AP Photo/Robert Galbraith/POOL)
Residents stand outside the damaged Superdome used as a shelter in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 2, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
Thousands of Hurricane Katrina survivors from New Orleans are relocated to a Red Cross shelter in the Houston Astrodome September 1, 2005 in Houston, TX.
New Orleans flooding
New Orleans, September 5, 2005 - Several boats, part of a large scale search and rescue mission into the flooded regions of the
Rescue workers move along Peoples Avenue in an air boat in New Orleans on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2005. Efforts continue to locate bodies and survivors of Hurricane Katrina, 12 days after it hit the Gulf Coast. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
Aerial view of massive flooding and breach in levees in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina August 30, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
FEMA urban search and rescue teams pull a survivors to safety in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 5, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
FEMA urban search and rescue teams search for survivors by boat in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 5, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
FEMA urban search and rescue teams search for survivors by air boat in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 3, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
FEMA urban search and rescue teams search for survivors by air boat in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 3, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
National Guardsmen using a front-end loader rescues survivors from the floodwater in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
FEMA Urban Search & Rescue teams carry and injured elderly man to an evacuation helicopter in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 1, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
Survivors being evacuated at New Orleans Airport to other states in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 1, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
Hurricane Katrina survivors from New Orleans search the message board for loved ones after being relocated to a Red Cross shelter in the Houston Astrodome September 4, 2005 in Houston, TX.
Sep 04, 2005; New Orleans, LA, USA; SEAN PENN escorts infirm people to Ochsna Hospital following a gas main fire in their neighborhood. Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. Mandatory Credit: Photo by Bryan Smith/ZUMA Press. (©) Copyright 2005 by Bryan Smith
USA Louisiana New Orleans
www.alamy.com
www.alamy.com
www.alamy.com
FEMA urban search and rescue teams pull a survivors to safety in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 5, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
Survivors rescued by urban search and rescue on an airboat in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
FEMA urban search and rescue teams search for survivors in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 5, 2005 in New Orleans, LA.
Animal rescue workers tend to a dog, dehydrated from the flight from Louisiana, at the San Francisco International Airport Sunday, Sept. 11, 2005, in San Francisco. Some of the animals who were displaced by Hurricane Katrina were brought to the Marine and Sacramento humane societies Sunday. (AP Photo/Julie Plasencia)
Rescue personnel paint a code on the side of a house in New Orleans on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2005. The code indicates whether there is a body, survivor or nobody inside the residence. Efforts continued to evacuate the city as well as locating survivors and bodies. (AP Photo/Steve Senne)
Search and Rescue workers from Oakland, Ca. carry a cadaver out of a house destroyed by Hurricane Katrina in East Biloxi, Miss., Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2005. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Search and rescue teams use boats and helicopters during operations in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2005 in New Orleans. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, Pool)
A Search and Rescue worker from Oakland, Ca. sprays decontaminates on a fellow team member after they collected a cadaver in a house destroyed by Hurricane Katrina in East Biloxi, Miss., Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2005. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
In this image provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, members of the Coast Guard Sector Ohio Valley Disaster Response Team and the Miami-Dade Urban Search and Rescue Team mark a house in New Orleans, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2005, to show that it has been searched for survivors of Hurricane Katrina. Teams are conducting massive search efforts for anyone who may still be trapped by the floodwaters. (AP Photo/U.S. Coast Guard, Robert Reed)
Two women are rescued by a U.S. Navy helicopter Monday, Sept. 5, 2005, in New Orleans. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, Pool)
Mexican navy sailors load boxes of bottled water onto the Mexican Navy ship Papaloapan in the port city of Tampico, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 5, 2005. The Papaloapan, carrying rescue vehicles and helicopters to aid the victims of the hurricane Katrina in the U.S., left port on Monday for the Mississippi coast. (AP Photo/Milenio Tampico-Sheva Seba)
A resident is rescued by helicopter from the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina Sunday, Sept. 4, 2005 in New Orleans. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Hurricane Katrina evacuee Audrey Harvey, 64, talks about spending four days in the attic of her New Orleans home before being rescued as an Arkansas National Guardsman carries a fan at Fort Chaffee in Barling, Ark., Saturday, Sept. 3, 2005. Evacuees began arriving at the nearby Fort Smith, Ark., airport Saturday. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston)
Joshwa Coyette, 3 cries inside the Houston Astrodome on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2005, in Houston. Joshwa and several of his siblings were rescued by their child care provider, Natasha Collins, who floated the children to the New Orleans Superdome on a mattress. Coyette's mother is one of the missing. (AP Photo/Jessica Kourkounis)
Rescue personnel lower an elderly woman into the waiting arms of others as the evacuation of flood victims in New Orleans continues on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2005. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
Rescue personnel lower an elderly woman into the waiting arms of others as the evacuation of flood victims in New Orleans continues on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2005. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
A woman cries as she waits with other flood victims at the Convention Center in New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many residents remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remain in the city awaiting a way out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Terri Jones tries to cool fellow flood victim Dorthy Divic, 89, who was overheated and exhausted at the Convention Center in New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many residents remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remain in the city awaiting a way out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Flood victims wait at the Convention Center in New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many resident remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remain in the city awaiting a way out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
A U.S. Coast Guard prepares for rescue opertaions, Friday, Sept. 2, 2005, in New Orleans. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, pool)
Residents are rescued by helicopter from the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005 in New Orleans. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Residents are rescued by helicopter from the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005 in New Orleans. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
A man is hoisted to the safety of a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter after being rescued from an apartment building in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina at the Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana Sept. 3, 2005. Those rescued were transported to Louis Armstrong Airport where they will depart for Houston. President Bush ordered the deployment of 7,000 additional U.S. troops to help desperate survivors of Hurricane Katrina as he acknowledged the initial federal effort had fallen short. (AP Photo/Robert Galbraith/POOL)
An emergency crew makes their way through the flood waters en route to rescue Hurricane Katrina victims, Saturday, Sept. 3, 2005 in New Orleans. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari)
People carry belongings through a flooded street in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Louisiana Sept. 3, 2005. Those rescued were transported to Louis Armstrong Airport where they will depart for Houston. President Bush ordered the deployment of 7,000 additional U.S. troops to help desperate survivors of Hurricane Katrina as he acknowledged the initial federal effort had fallen short. (AP Photo/Pool, Robert Galbraith)
A woman suffering from diabetes is helped from a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter after being rescued from her home in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Louisiana Friday, Sept. 2, 2005. (AP Photo/Robert Galbraith, Pool)
A New Orleans police officer keeps watch over a section of the French Quarter in New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many residents remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remain in the city awaiting a way out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
A woman and her child wait with hundreds of other flood victims at the convention center in New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many residents remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remain in the city awaiting a way out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
A flood victim in need of medical attention is carted away from the Convention Center in New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many residents remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remain in the city awaiting a way out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Flood victims pile into a truck as hundreds of others wait at the Convention Center in New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many resident remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remain in the city awaiting a way out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Flood victims walk the street in front of the Convention Center in New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many resident remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remain in the city awaiting a way out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
A man needing medications waits with other flood victims at the Convention Center in New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many resident remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remain in the city awaiting a way out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Flood victims search for supplies on the east side of New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many residents remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remain in the city awaiting a way out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Hundereds flood victims wait at the Convention Center in New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many resident remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remain in the city awaiting a way out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
A flood survivor listens to the radio as she sits in the rain near the convention center in New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005, while waiting to be evacuated from the city. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many resident remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remained in the city awaiting a way out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Member of the FEMA Urban Search and Rescue Task Force One team from Virginia make their way through debris from Hurricane Katrina to document corpses in Waveland, Miss., on Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Terri Jones, right, and others try to cool down fellow flood victim Dorthy Divic, 89, center, who was over heated and exausted at the convention center in New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many resident remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remain in the city awaiting a way out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
A military helicopter makes a food and water drop to flood victims near the convention center in New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many resident remained in the city and had to be rescued from flooded homes and hotels and remain in the city awaiting a way out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

(Reuters) - Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin was due to report to federal prison on Monday to begin serving a 10-year sentence for corruption during the years when the city was struggling to recover from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina.

Nagin, a Democrat, was thrust into the national spotlight in 2005, when Katrina overwhelmed levees and flooded 80 percent of New Orleans, killing 1,500 people and causing some $80 billion in damage.

He is due to serve his time at a federal prison in Texarkana, Texas, according to television station WDSU.

Nagin, 58, plans to appeal his conviction. He has said in court filings that he is nearly penniless, and has been granted a court-appointed lawyer.

The onetime cable company executive who served as New Orleans' mayor from 2002-2010 was convicted on 20 criminal counts including bribery, conspiracy and money laundering, all tied to payments he received for granting city contracts.

Seeking re-election in 2006, Nagin, a black politician who had enjoyed strong support from both black and white voters, seemed to adopt a racially divisive tone, urging residents to rebuild a "chocolate New Orleans," referring to its majority black population.

Under federal sentencing rules, Nagin would serve about 8-1/2 years in prison with good behavior.

(Reporting by Jonathan Kaminsky. Editing by Chris Micahud ad Simon Cameron-Moore)

More on AOL.com:
Ebola is surging in places it had been beaten back
Family tragedy shapes some Miss America platforms
Iran's supreme leader undergoes prostate surgery

Former New Orleans Mayor Sentenced to 10 Years

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners