Germany to provide funds to Nazis' child victims

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Germany to provide funds to Nazis' child victims
Walter Frankenstein born in 1924, one of the last survivors of the Baruch Auerbach Orphanage for Jewish Girls and Boys, reads the names and the age of deported children, killed by the nazis , prior to the official unveiling of the memorial at Schoenhauser Allee 162 in Berlin, Thursday, June 26, 2014. The children were deported from the orphanage to Riga in 1942 where they were murdered. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
Israeli artist and Holocaust survivor Yehuda Bacon attends the presentation of the Video Archive and Interview Project by the Foundation Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin, Monday, June 23, 2014. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
In this photo taken Wednesday, April 9, 2014, Israeli Holocaust survivor Asher Aud (Sieradski), 86, originally from Poland, shows his number tattooed on his arm by the Nazis at the Auschwitz concentration camp as he poses for a portrait in Jerusalem. Of all the atrocities he endured, Aud said the strongest memory is the one that was most traumatic _ parting from his mother at the age of 14. It was September 1942. The Nazis had rounded up the Jewish community inside the local cemetery and were preparing to deport them. His father and older brother had already been taken and he was left with his mother and younger brother, Gavriel."I remember looking down and I happened to be standing on my grandmother's tombstone," he recalled. "The Germans walked among us and anytime they saw a mother with a child, they tore the child from her arms and threw them into the back of trucks." That's when he realized life as he knew it was over." I looked around and I just said 'mother, this is where we are going to be separated,'" he said. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
In this photo taken March 4, 2014, Berlin, Germany, Edgar Krasa, right, a 93-year-old survivor of Nazi concentration camps meets with W. Michael Blumenthal, former U.S. Treasury Secretary who now heads the Jewish Museum in the German capital. The two were attending a performance of a mass to commemorate the victims of Nazi terror at the Terezin concentration camp. Edgar Krasa took part in one of the ennobling acts of the Holocaust. He didn’t take up arms in a ghetto insurrection, or fight in the Jewish underground. Instead, he and several hundred fellow concentration camp inmates defied the Nazis through music. (AP Photo/Svea Pietschmann-Judisches Museum Berlin)
Holocaust survivor Samuel Willenberg poses for a picture at his studio, during an interview with the Associated Press in Tel Aviv, Israel, Sunday, Oct. 31, 2010. They are believed to be the last two survivors of the most chillingly efficient killing machine of the Nazi Holocaust: the Treblinka extermination camp in Poland. Samuel Willenberg and Kalman Taigman, 87-year-old Israelis, escaped the death trap and are now devoting their final years trying to preserve the memory of the 875,000 people who were systematically murdered at Treblinka in a one-year killing spree at the height of World War II. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
Holocaust survivors Peri Hirsch, left, and Blanch Hecht pose for a photo during the Holocaust Remembrance Day Gathering, Sunday, April 11, 2010 in New York. Hirsch and Hecht grew up together in the same town and survived the Auschwitz concentration camp. (AP Photo/Stephen Chernin)
Holocaust survivor Joseph Fox poses for a photo during the Holocaust Remembrance Day gathering, Sunday, April 11, 2010 in New York. Fox is a survivor of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising. (AP Photo/Stephen Chernin)
Holocaust survivor Bela Shampan poses for a photo during the Holocaust Remembrance Day gathering, Sunday, April 11, 2010 in New York. Shampan is a survivor of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. (AP Photo/Stephen Chernin)
Holocaust survivor Bernard Gotfryd poses for a photo during the Holocaust Remembrance Day gathering, Sunday, April 11, 2010 in New York. Gotfryd is a survivor of the Majdanek concentration camp. (AP Photo/Stephen Chernin)
Holocaust survivor Joseph Gringlas poses for a photo during the Holocaust Remembrance Day gathering, Sunday, April 11, 2010 in New York. Gringlas is a survivor of the Majdanek and Auschwitz concentration camps. (AP Photo/Stephen Chernin)
In this photo taken Wednesday, April 9, 2014, Israeli Holocaust survivor Jacob Philipson Armon, 76, originally from the Netherlands, poses for a portrait in Jerusalem. For Armon, memories are hard to come by. He was only two when his native Holland was captured by the Nazis, and three years later he went into hiding just like his more famous compatriot Anne Frank. The family's five children were dispersed among various non-Jews who risked their lives to protect them. His story has mostly been recreated by documents, the testimony of others and the smidgen of images seared into his mind. "I remember the scary things. I remember crying and being so hungry that I couldn't fall asleep," he said. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
FILE - In this March 25, 2010 photo, 87-year-old Arieh Bleier poses for a portrait in Shaar Menashe Mental Health Center for Holocaust survivors in northern Israel. Hungarian-born Bleier survived a concentration camp in Austria. His parents and brother were murdered in Auschwitz. In Israel he has been hospitalized for decades, traumatized by his Holocaust experiences. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner) ** zu unserem KORR **
In this March 25, 2010 photo, Holocaust survivor Michael Antushewicz poses for a portrait in Shaar Menashe Mental Health Center for Holocaust survivors in northern Israel. Antushewicz was born in Belarus in 1940, immigrating to Israel in 1966 and has been hospitalized for decades. On Sunday night Israel begins its annual 24-hour commemoration of the 6 million Jews murdered by the Nazis, and next month sees the 65th anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
In this photo taken Wednesday, April 9, 2014, Israeli Holocaust survivor Asher Aud (Sieradski), 86, originally from Poland, poses for a portrait in Jerusalem. Aud will be one of the six survivors chosen to light a symbolic torch at Israel’s official ceremony Sunday night marking the remembrance day. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
In this photo taken Wednesday, April 9, 2014, Israeli Holocaust survivor Shmuel Bogler, 84, originally from Hungary, poses for a portrait in Jerusalem. Bogler never had the opportunity to say goodbye to his family, rounded up from their home in Bodrogkeresztur and, like most of the Hungarian Jewish community, transported to Auschwitz. Of the family's 10 children, one had died young, three had fled before the war and three others had previously been taken to work camps. Bogler was left with his parents, one brother and one sister when they were crammed into a cattle car. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
A Holocaust survivor places a lit candle at the Monument of the Victims during ceremonies to mark the 69th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz Nazi death camp's in Oswiecim, Poland, on Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, after the Soviet Red Army liberated the camp. The Nazis killed some 1.5 million people, mostly Jews at the camp during World War II. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
Holocaust survivors arrive for a ceremony to mark the 69th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz Nazi death camp's in Oswiecim, Poland, on Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, since the Soviet Red Army liberated the camp. Israeli lawmakers and government officials are to attend anniversary observances later in the day. The Nazis killed some 1.5 million people, mostly Jews at the camp during World War II. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
Holocaust survivors arrive for a ceremony to mark the 69th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz Nazi death camp's in Oswiecim, Poland, on Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, since the Soviet Red Army liberated the camp. Israeli lawmakers and government officials are to attend anniversary observances later in the day. The Nazis killed some 1.5 million people, mostly Jews at the camp during World War II. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
Czech Republic's President Miloz Zeman, 2nd left, accompanied with wife Ivana, right, and his Germany's counterpart Joachim Gauck, 3rd left, with his partner Daniela Schadt, left, meet with holocaust survivors Felix Kolmer, 2nd right, and Tomas Kosta, 3rd right, at the former nazi concentration camp of Terezin in Terezin, Czech Republic, Tuesday, May 6, 2014. Gauck is to Czech Republic on a three-day official visit. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
Leon Gersten, right, greets Czeslaw Polziec, of Poland, after they had not seen each other for 69 years in New York, Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013. Polziec's family hid the Gerstens, a Jewish family, from Nazi occupiers in their attic for two years during the Holocaust. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
In this Thursday, April 4, 2013 photo, Warsaw ghetto Holocaust survivor Aliza Vitis-Shomron holds a photograph of herself when she was about 17 years old as she sits in her living room in Kibbutz Givat Oz, Israel. Two days before her comrades embarked on an uprising that came to symbolize Jewish resistance against the Nazis in World War II, 14-year-old Aliza Mendel got her orders: Escape from the Warsaw Ghetto. The end was near. Nazi troops had encircled the ghetto, and the remaining Jewish rebels inside were prepared to die fighting. Her job, they told her, was to survive and tell the world about how the fighters died resisting the Nazis. In the 70 years since the revolt, she's been doing just that, publishing a memoir about life in the ghetto and lecturing about the uprising.(AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
Stuart E. Eizenstat, chief negotiator of the Jewish Claims Conference walks through the Holocaust Memorial, after an interview with The Associated Press in Berlin, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2012. Sixty years after a landmark accord started German government compensation for victims of Nazi crimes, fund administrators and German officials say payments to Holocaust survivors are needed more than ever as they enter their final years. In acknowledgement of that, German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble was to sign off officially Thursday on revisions to the original 1952 compensation treaty, increasing pensions for those living in eastern Europe and broadening who is eligible for payments. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
Stuart E. Eizenstat, chief negotiator of the Jewish Claims Conference walks through the Holocaust Memorial, after an interview with The Associated Press in Berlin, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2012. Sixty years after a landmark accord started German government compensation for victims of Nazi crimes, fund administrators and German officials say payments to Holocaust survivors are needed more than ever as they enter their final years. In acknowledgement of that, German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble was to sign off officially Thursday on revisions to the original 1952 compensation treaty, increasing pensions for those living in eastern Europe and broadening who is eligible for payments. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
Wladyslaw Bartoszewski, center, former Polish foreign minister and survivors of the German Nazi death camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau places a candle at a monument to the victims during ceremonies marking the 66th anniversary of the camp's liberation on Thursday, Jan.27, 2011, in Brzezinka, Poland. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
Survivors of the German Nazi death camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau sit in front at a monument to the victims during ceremonies marking the 66th anniversary of the camp's liberation on Thursday, Jan.27, 2011, in Brzezinka, Poland. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
President Barack Obama awards Holocaust survivor and author Gerda Weissmann Klein a 2010 Medal of Freedom during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Holocaust survivor Samuel Willenberg displays a map of Treblinka extermination camp during an interview with the Associated Press at his house in Tel Aviv, Israel, Sunday, Oct. 31, 2010. They are believed to be the last two survivors of the most chillingly efficient killing machine of the Nazi Holocaust: the Treblinka extermination camp in Poland. Samuel Willenberg and Kalman Taigman, 87-year-old Israelis, escaped the death trap and are now devoting their final years trying to preserve the memory of the 875,000 people who were systematically murdered at Treblinka in a one-year killing spree at the height of World War II. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this March 25, 2010 photo, Holocaust survivor Avraham Meuchas poses for a portrait in Shaar Menashe Mental Health Center for Holocaust survivors in northern Israel. Meuchas was born in Bulgaria in 1935, immigrating to Israel in 1948 and has been hospitalized for decades. On Sunday night Israel begins its annual 24-hour commemoration of the 6 million Jews murdered by the Nazis, and next month sees the 65th anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
In this March 25, 2010 photo, Sarah Kaplan poses for a portrait in Shaar Menashe Mental Health Center for Holocaust survivors in northern Israel. Kaplan was born in the Ukraine in 1944. She immigrated to Israel in 1949 and has been hospitalized for decades. On Sunday night Israel begins its annual 24-hour commemoration of the 6 million Jews murdered by the Nazis, and next month sees the 65th anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
In this March 25, 2010 photo, Holocaust survivor Roland Finklestein poses for a portrait in Shaar Menashe Mental Health Center for Holocaust survivors in northern Israel. Finklestein was born in France 1931. He survived the war in Paris but has no recollection of it. He immigrated to Israel in 1949 and has been hospitalized for decades. On Sunday night Israel begins its annual 24-hour commemoration of the 6 million Jews murdered by the Nazis, and next month sees the 65th anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
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By DAVID RISING

BERLIN (AP) - The German government has agreed to provide additional financial assistance for child survivors of the Holocaust, who are suffering increasing problems associated with malnutrition and psychological trauma when they were young.

The Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany said the agreement reached with the Finance Ministry late Wednesday would provide one-time payments of 2,500 euros ($3,280) for Jewish children who were in concentration camps, ghettos or spent at least six months in hiding.

The Claims Conference didn't say how many might be affected, but it's thought that tens of thousands of survivors might qualify for the payments. The Finance Ministry on Thursday confirmed the agreement but refused to provide further details.

Claims Conference executive vice president Greg Schneider said Jewish children survivors had to endure serious undernourishment, sometimes for years, among other physical harm. Some were witness to "unimaginable atrocities."

"A range of injurious experiences has had a cumulative effect ... resulting in late-onset problems that are only now manifesting as physical and psychological symptoms in the survivors' advanced age," Schneider said in a statement.

Because so many survivors lost most, if not all, relatives in the Holocaust, many lack support in their old age.

The agreement, which still has to be approved by the German Parliament but isn't expected to meet any political resistance, will provide the one-time payment for special psychological and medical care to Nazi victims born Jan. 1, 1928 or later. That would have made them at oldest 11 at the start of the war, and 17 by its end.

The payment would come in addition to any other compensation they have received, and the fund is expected to become operational Jan. 1.

In total, Germany has paid around 70 billion euros ($95 billion) in compensation for Nazi crimes, primarily to Jewish survivors.

Compensation has evolved continuously since Germany agreed in 1952 to make payments, with annual negotiations between the Claims Conference and the German government on who should receive funds and how much will be paid.

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