Flight passengers treated to up close view of Bardarbunga volcano

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Flight passengers treated to up close view of Bardarbunga volcano
Our pilot made an extra circle around #Bardarbunga this morning to let passengers check it out. Thanks to Erla Vinsý! http://t.co/7JUerxD0tE
A close up of lava from an eruption on Holuhraun, northwest of the Dyngjujoekull glacier in Iceland, Monday, Sept. 1, 2014. Lava fountains danced along a lengthy volcanic fissure near Iceland's subglacial Bardarbunga volcano Sunday, prompting authorities to raise the aviation warning code to the highest level and close the surrounding airspace. The warning was lowered 12 hours later as visibility improved and it was clear that no volcanic ash was detected. (AP Photo/Eggert Johannesson)
In this aerial view, fountains of lava, up to 60 meters high, spurt from a fissure in the ground on the north side of the Bardarbunga volcano in Iceland, Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014. The alert warning for the area surrounding Iceland's Bardarbunga volcano remained at orange on Tuesday, indicating that it is showing increased unrest with greater potential for an explosive eruption. (AP Photo/Stefano Di Nicolo)
The sky over the site of a lava eruption on Holuhraun, northwest of the Dyngjujoekull glacier in Iceland, Monday, Sept. 1, 2014. Lava fountains danced along a lengthy volcanic fissure near Iceland's subglacial Bardarbunga volcano Sunday, prompting authorities to raise the aviation warning code to the highest level and close the surrounding airspace. The warning was lowered 12 hours later as visibility improved and it was clear that no volcanic ash was detected. (AP Photo/Eggert Johannesson)
Map locates Iceland eruption.; 2c x 4 inches; 96.3 mm x 101 mm;
A man stands near to a lava eruption on Holuhraun, northwest of the Dyngjujoekull glacier in Iceland, Monday, Sept. 1, 2014. Lava fountains danced along a lengthy volcanic fissure near Iceland's subglacial Bardarbunga volcano Sunday, prompting authorities to raise the aviation warning code to the highest level and close the surrounding airspace. The warning was lowered 12 hours later as visibility improved and it was clear that no volcanic ash was detected. (AP Photo/Eggert Johannesson)
In this aerial view, smoke and lava rise from a fissure in the ground on the north side of the Bardarbunga volcano in Iceland, Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014. The alert warning for the area surrounding Iceland's Bardarbunga volcano remained at orange on Tuesday, indicating that it is showing increased unrest with greater potential for an explosive eruption. (AP Photo/Stefano Di Nicolo)
Map locates Bardarbunga.; 1c x 4 inches; 46.5 mm x 101 mm;
In this image taken from amateur video, smoke from the Grimsvotn volcano, Iceland is seen from a plane Saturday, May 21, 2011. Iceland's most active volcano has started erupting, scientists said Saturday, just over a year after another eruption on the North Atlantic island shut down European air traffic for days, but the impact of this volcanic eruption is not yet known. (AP Photo/Amateur video via APTN) ICELAND OUT, TV OUT
In this aerial image from video made Saturday May 8 2010 a renewed column of ash rises from Iceland's Eyjafjallajokul volcano. The plume of volcanic ash snaked its way through southern France, Switzerland, Italy and Germany on Sunday May 9, shutting down airports and disrupting flights across Europe. Trans-Atlantic connections were also being diverted around a larger patch of ash cloud stretching from southern Greenland to the coast of Portugal, adding several hours to flights between Europe and North America and causing congestion as airlines tried to squeeze their planes through remaining routes. (AP Photo/ APTN) ** TV OUT **
REYKJAVIK, ICELAND - NOVEMBER 08: Towering ash plume from Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull crater during it's eruption, spewing tephra and cloud of ashes that drift toward continental Europe on May 10 2010 near Reykjavik, Iceland. (Photo by Etienne De Malglaive/Getty Images)
In this image from video made Saturday May 8 2010 a renewed column of ash rises from Iceland's Eyjafjallajokul volcano. The plume of volcanic ash snaked its way through southern France, Switzerland, Italy and Germany on Sunday May 9, shutting down airports and again disrupting flights across Europe. Trans-Atlantic connections were also being diverted around a larger patch of ash cloud stretching from southern Greenland to the coast of Portugal, adding several hours to flights between Europe and North America and causing congestion as airlines tried to squeeze their planes through remaining routes. (AP Photo/ APTN) ** TV OUT **
A plume of ash rises from a volcano erupting under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier, Hvolsvollur, Iceland, Wednesday, May 5, 2010. A new wave of dense volcanic ash from Iceland snarled air traffic Wednesday in Ireland and Scotland and threatened to spill into the air space of England. (AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti)
Ash and cloud surround a volcano erupting under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier, Hvolsvollur, Iceland, Wednesday, May 5, 2010. A new wave of dense volcanic ash from Iceland snarled air traffic Wednesday in Ireland and Scotland and threatened to spill into the air space of England. (AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti)
Planes grounded at Belfast City Airport, Northern Ireland, Wednesday, May, 5, 2010. A new wave of dense volcanic ash from Iceland snarled air traffic Wednesday in Ireland and Scotland and threatened to spill into the air space of England. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
RT @TIME: See close-ups of a volcanic eruption in Iceland Photo: Ragnar Th. Sigurdsson—Arctic Images http://t.co/vlMw15zQeT http://t.co/PS9…
Iceland reopens airspace after lowering the threat alert on Bardarbunga Volcano from red to orange.
On August 31st lava began to spew from Iceland’s second tallest mountain, Bardarbunga, with fountains of molten rock reaching heights of over 160 feet.
The alert warning for the area surrounding Iceland's Bardarbunga volcano was kept at orange on Tuesday, indicating increased unrest with greater potential for an eruption. Smoke is spewing from the volcano, and lava is spouting nearby. (Sept. 2)
Iceland issues a red alert to the aviation industry for the Bardarbunga volcano, meaning significant ash emissions are likely.
This picture taken on August 23, 2014 shows scientists to fixing and updating Seismometer and communication equipment that broke down the other day over Bardarbunga volcano, Iceland. Iceland lowered its alert over the nation's largest volcanic system to orange on Sunday after keeping it for one day at the maximum level amid fears of an imminent eruption. AFP PHOTO / Arni Saeberg / ICELAND OUT (Photo credit should read ARNI SAEBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
In an in an image from an Aug. 19, 2014 video, a sign is posted on the road next to Bardarbunga, a subglacial stratovolcano located under Iceland's largest glacier. On Saturday, Aug. 23, 2014, Iceland closed airspace over the Bardarbunga volcano on Saturday after the Meteorological Office said an eruption had begun under the ice of Europe’s largest glacier. The English portion of the sign reads, ""Uncertainty phase due to unrest in Bardarbunga". (AP Photo/Courtesy Channel 2 Iceland)
Passengers stand in front of the announcement panels as all flights are canceled at Tegel Airport in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, May 25, 2011. Hundreds of flights were canceled in Europe as winds blew the cloud of ash from the Grimsvotn volcano over parts of northern Europe. Experts say that particles in the ash could stall jet engines and sandblast planes' windows. (AP Photo/Gero Breloer)
All flights are canceled on the annunciator panel at Tegel Airport after the air space above parts of Germany was closed in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, May 25, 2011. Hundreds of flights were canceled in Europe as winds blew the cloud of ash from the Grimsvotn volcano over parts of northern Europe. Experts say that particles in the ash could stall jet engines and sandblast planes' windows. (AP Photo/Gero Breloer)
Farmers check on their animals near Kirkjubaearklaustur 260 km (162 miles) from Reykjavík, Iceland Tuesday May 24 2011 after the Grimsvotn volcano began erupting on Saturday, sending clouds of ash high into the air that have then been carried toward the European continent on the wind. Experts say that particles in the ash could stall jet engines and sandblast planes' windows. The ash cloud forced US President Barack Obama to shorten a visit to Ireland on Monday, and has raised fears of a repeat of huge travel disruptions in Europe last year when emissions from another of Iceland's volcanos, Eyjafjalljokull, stranded millions of passengers.(AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti )
Passengers board an Icelandair flight at Akureyi Airport, Saturday, April 24, 2010, in Akureyi, Iceland to Glasgow. For the first time since the April 14 eruption, Iceland's major international airport was closed after shifting winds blew the ash cloud toward the capital of Reykjavik, west of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano. Trans-Atlantic flights on Icelandair that usually stop in Iceland were being rerouted through Glasgow in Scotland. Akureyi Airport remains open with an afternoon flight to Glasgow. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
An aircraft passes the moon over Frankfurt, central Germany, Thursday, April 22, 2010, as German air traffic went back to normality following the airspace closure due to the volcanic ash cloud that came from Iceland. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
Sheep raise an ash cloud as they run in a field near Kirkjubaearklaustur 260 km (162 miles) from Reykjavík, Iceland Tuesday May 24 2011 after the Grimsvotn volcano began erupting on Saturday, sending clouds of ash high into the air that have then been carried toward the European continent on the wind. Experts say that particles in the ash could stall jet engines and sandblast planes' windows. The ash cloud forced US President Barack Obama to shorten a visit to Ireland on Monday, and has raised fears of a repeat of huge travel disruptions in Europe last year when emissions from another of Iceland's volcanos, Eyjafjalljokull, stranded millions of passengers.(AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti )
A dead lamb lies covered in ash near Kirkjubaearklaustur 260 km (162 miles) from Reykjavík, Iceland Tuesday May 24 2011 after the Grimsvotn volcano began erupting on Saturday, sending clouds of ash high into the air that have then been carried toward the European continent on the wind. Experts say that particles in the ash could stall jet engines and sandblast planes' windows. The ash cloud forced US President Barack Obama to shorten a visit to Ireland on Monday, and has raised fears of a repeat of huge travel disruptions in Europe last year when emissions from another of Iceland's volcanos, Eyjafjalljokull, stranded millions of passengers.(AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti )
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By MORGAN WHITAKER

If you know anyone who flies regularly, you've probably seen more than a couple pictures taken through an airplane window on Facebook or Instagram, but you probably haven't seen anything quite this cool.

Passengers aboard an Icelandair flight were treated to a spectacular view of the Bardarbunga volcano Wednesday morning when the pilot decided to veer off course, according to a tweet sent out by the airline. The airline says the pilot rerouted the plane to circle the volcano specifically to give the fliers a chance to check it out more closely.

Iceland has dozens of volcanoes, according to Volcano Discovery, but the Bardarbunga is the only one currently erupting. Icelandic authorities initially closed the airspace around the volcano when it began spewing lava last month, after earthquakes rocked the volcano. Officials then raised the country's aviation alert to its highest level, indicating a risk of "significant emission of ash into the atmosphere" according to the Associated Press. Icelandic meteorologists said the seismic activity near volcano had dropped and its lava eruption appeared to be less active, the AP reported Tuesday.

The last time an Icelandic volcano made headlines air travelers got far more misery than glee. Back in 2010 Eyafjallajökull became the word all television reporters struggled to pronounce as the Icelanic volcano known by that complicated name started spewing ash at an astounding rate. The ash clogged up popular flight routes so much that more than 100,000 flights were canceled.

The next year the Grimsvotn volcano had a smaller but similar impact on flights when winds blew ash over parts of northern Europe.

Check out other cool pics snapped in the sky.
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