Liberian Ebola survivor praises experimental drug

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Ebola Virus Outbreak -- updated 10/18/2014
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Liberian Ebola survivor praises experimental drug
FILE- In this Aug. 11, 2014, file photo, a health worker cleans his hands with chlorinated water before entering a Ebola screening tent, at the Kenema Government Hospital situated in the Eastern Province around 300 kilometer (186 miles) from the capital city of Freetown in Kenema, Sierra Leone. (AP Photo/Michael Duff, File)
Healthcare workers wear protective gear before entering into an Ebola treatment centre in Hastings, Freetown, Sierra Leone, Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014. Some doctors in countries hit hardest by the deadly Ebola disease decline to operate on pregnant women for fear the virus could spread. Governments face calls from frightened citizens to bar travel to and from the afflicted region. Meanwhile, the stakes get higher as more people get sick, highlighting a tricky balance between protecting people and preserving their rights in a global crisis. (AP Photo/Michael Duff)
Healthcare workers prepare medicines for Patients at an Ebola treatment centre in Hastings, Freetown, Sierra Leone, Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014. Some doctors in countries hit hardest by the deadly Ebola disease decline to operate on pregnant women for fear the virus could spread. Governments face calls from frightened citizens to bar travel to and from the afflicted region. Meanwhile, the stakes get higher as more people get sick, highlighting a tricky balance between protecting people and preserving their rights in a global crisis. (AP Photo/Michael Duff)
Former Ebola patient Dr. Richard Sacra declares "Go Big Red" with his wife Debbie looking on, right, in a news conference at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014. Dr. Sacra who was treated at the medical center the last three weeks has left his room in the biocontainment unit and will head home soon. The CDC confirmed that two separate blood samples taken from Dr. Sacra 24 hours apart show the Ebola virus is no longer in his bloodstream. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Former Ebola patient Dr. Richard Sacra arrives to a news conference at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014. Dr. Sacra who was treated at the medical center the last three weeks has left his room in the biocontainment unit and will head home soon. The CDC confirmed that two separate blood samples taken from Dr. Sacra 24 hours apart show the Ebola virus is no longer in his bloodstream. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Former Ebola patient Dr. Richard Sacra participates in a news conference at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014. Dr. Sacra who was treated at the medical center the last three weeks has left his room in the biocontainment unit and will head home soon. The CDC confirmed that two seperate blood samples taken from Dr. Sacra 24 hours apart show the Ebola virus is no longer in his bloodstream. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
An American doctor who was exposed to Ebola virus while volunteering in Sierra Leone walks across the tarmac Sunday, Sept. 28, 2014, at the Frederick (Md) Municipal Airport towards a waiting ambulance from the National Institutes of Health. The doctor, who is not showing signs of being infected, will be transported to the NIH facility in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Timothy Jacobsen)
An American doctor who was exposed to Ebola virus while volunteering in Sierra Leone walks across the tarmac after disembarks from a Gulfstream jet Sunday, Sept. 28, 2014, at the Frederick (Md) Municipal Airport. The doctor, who is not showing signs of being infected, will be transported to the National Institutes of Health facility in Bethesda, Md.(AP Photo/Timothy Jacobsen)
An ambulance from the National Institutes of Health carying anAmerican doctor who was exposed to Ebola virus while volunteering in Sierra Leone gets a thumbs up from an unidentified man Sunday, September 28, 2014 at Frederick (Md) Municipal Airport. The doctor, who is not soing signs of being infected, was transported to the ambulance from a Gulfsteam jet and was bound for National Institues of Health facilities in Bethesda, Md.
Fight paramedics and doctors from the National Institutes of Health carry bags of items belonging to an American doctor who was exposed to Ebola virus while volunteering in Sierra Leone from a Gulfstream jet Sunday, Sept. 28, 2014, at the Frederick (Md) Municipal Airport. The doctor, who is not showing signs of being infected, will be transported to the National Institutes of Health facility in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Timothy Jacobsen)
FILE - This Jan. 14, 2014 file photo shows Daniel Bennett quarantined in an isolation unit at the National Institute of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md., during research for a better flu vaccine. The NIH is preparing to care for an American doctor who was exposed to the Ebola virus while volunteering in Sierra Leone. As early as Sunday, Sept. 28, 2014, the physician is expected to be admitted to the same special isolation unit at NIH's hospital out of what the agency called "an abundance of caution," for observation. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
A child plays in the streets of Monrovia, Liberia, Sunday Sept. 28, 2014. Six months into the world’s worst-ever Ebola outbreak, and the first to happen in an unprepared West Africa, the gap between what has been sent by other countries and private groups and what is desperately needed is huge. Even as countries try to marshal more resources to close the gap, those needs threaten to become much greater, and possibly even insurmountable. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Children sit in from of their home in the St. Paul Bridge neighborhood of Monrovia, Liberia, Sunday Sept. 28, 2014. Six months into the world’s worst-ever Ebola outbreak, and the first to happen in an unprepared West Africa, the gap between what has been sent by other countries and private groups and what is desperately needed is huge. Even as countries try to marshal more resources to close the gap, those needs threaten to become much greater, and possibly even insurmountable. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
A Liberian woman sells bananas on the side of the road in Monrovia, Liberia, Sunday Sept. 28, 2014. Six months into the world’s worst-ever Ebola outbreak, and the first to happen in an unprepared West Africa, the gap between what has been sent by other countries and private groups and what is desperately needed is huge. Even as countries try to marshal more resources to close the gap, those needs threaten to become much greater, and possibly even insurmountable. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
A Liberian child sells oranges as journalists gather at the site where a team or U.S. Navy engineers prepares the ground for a 25-bed medical facility they are building next to the airport in Monrovia, Liberia, Saturday Sept. 27, 2014. Six months into the world’s worst-ever Ebola outbreak, and the first to happen in an unprepared West Africa, the gap between what has been sent by other countries and private groups and what is desperately needed is huge. Even as countries try to marshal more resources to close the gap, those needs threaten to become much greater, and possibly even insurmountable. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Bystanders listen to a street preacher calling on people to raise their hands and "Wave Ebola Bye Bye" in Monrovia, Liberia, Saturday Sept. 27, 2014. Six months into the world’s worst-ever Ebola outbreak, and the first to happen in an unprepared West Africa, the gap between what has been sent by other countries and private groups and what is desperately needed is huge. Even as countries try to marshal more resources to close the gap, those needs threaten to become much greater, and possibly even insurmountable. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Medical staff carry the body of a Ebola victim, at the French medical NGO Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) in Monrovia on September 27, 2014. Liberia welcomed global pledges of action on the Ebola epidemic ravaging west Africa, admitting on September 26 that the government was losing the trust of its people with the outbreak still out of control. AFP PHOTO / PASCAL GUYOT (Photo credit should read PASCAL GUYOT/AFP/Getty Images)
Former Ebola patient Dr. Richard Sacra participates in a news conference at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014. Dr. Sacra who was treated at the medical center for the last three weeks, has left his room in the biocontainment unit and will head home soon. The CDC confirmed that two separate blood samples taken from Dr. Sacra 24 hours apart show the Ebola virus is no longer in his bloodstream. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
A woman wears protective clothing during a tour of one of the Ebola Centers in Harare, Zimbabwe, Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. Zimbabwe, which has not reported any cases of the deadly virus wreaking havoc in West Africa, is on high alert and has set up Ebola centers in order to screen people suspected of the virus. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
A World Health Organization, WHO, worker, center, trains nurses to use Ebola protective gear in Freetown, Sierra Leone, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. Shoppers crowded streets and markets in Sierra Leone's capital on Thursday stocking up for a three-day shutdown that authorities will hope will slow the spread of the Ebola outbreak that is accelerating across West Africa. (AP Photo/ Michael Duff)
A photos of the Ebolla virus is displayed on a television monitor during a hearing on the Ebola outbreak at the House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
In this photo taken on Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014, a sign reading 'Kill Ebola Before Ebola Kill You', on a gate forming part of the country's Ebola awareness campaign in the city of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Shoppers crowded streets and markets in Sierra Leone's capital on Thursday, Sept. 18, stocking up for a three-day shutdown that authorities will hope will slow the spread of the Ebola outbreak that is accelerating across West Africa. (AP Photo/ Michael Duff)
This picture taken on September 21, 2014 shows beds inside the 'Island Clinic', a new Ebola treatment centre that opened in Monrovia. Liberia announced plans on September 21 for a four-fold increase in beds for Ebola patients in its overwhelmed capital Monrovia, as US troops arrived to help tackle the deadly epidemic. The announcement came two weeks after the World Health Organization (WHO) warned that the country, worst-hit in the regional outbreak, with more than 1,450 deaths, would soon face thousands of new cases. AFP PHOTO / ZOOM DOSSO (Photo credit should read ZOOM DOSSO/AFP/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - SEPTEMBER 22: Medics wearing special uniform carry the 69-year-old Garcia Viejo, Spanish priest who was diagnosed with the Ebola virus while working in Sierra Leone to the ambulance, at the military airport Torrejon de Ardoz in Madrid, Spain on September 22, 2014. (Photo by Spain Ministry of Defense/Pool/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
A doctor wearing protective gear takes part in a drill of handling a patient infected with Ebola, in Hong Kong Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014. An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. The university student is Senegal's first case of the dreaded disease. (AP Photo/Tyrone Siu, Pool)
Dr Felicity Hartnell, who is a clinical research fellow at Oxford University, holds a vial of an experimental vaccine against Ebola in Oxford, England Wednesday Sept. 17, 2014. A former nurse will be the first of 60 healthy volunteers in the UK who will receive the vaccine. The vaccine was developed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and GlaxoSmithKline and targets the Zaire strain of Ebola, the cause of the ongoing outbreak in West Africa. A trial of the same vaccine has already begun in the U.S. (AP Photo/Steve Parsons/Pool)
Dr Felicity Hartnell, who is a clinical research fellow at Oxford University, injects former nurse Ruth Atkins the first of 60 healthy volunteers in the UK who will receive an experimental vaccine against Ebola in Oxford, England Wednesday Sept. 17, 2014. The vaccine was developed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and GlaxoSmithKline and targets the Zaire strain of Ebola, the cause of the ongoing outbreak in West Africa. A trial of the same vaccine has already begun in the U.S. (AP Photo/Steve Parsons/Pool)
Professor Adrian Hill, Director leader of the trials for the experimental Ebola vaccine holds a vial of the vaccine in Oxford, England Wednesday Sept. 17, 2014. A former nurse will be the first of 60 healthy volunteers in the U.K. who will receive the vaccine. The vaccine was developed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and GlaxoSmithKline and targets the Zaire strain of Ebola, the cause of the ongoing outbreak in West Africa. A trial of the same vaccine has already begun in the U.S. (AP Photo/Steve Parsons/Pool)
Dr Felicity Hartnell, who is a clinical research fellow at Oxford University, injects former nurse Ruth Atkins the first of 60 healthy volunteers in the U.K. who will receive an experimental vaccine against Ebola in Oxford, England Wednesday Sept. 17, 2014. The vaccine was developed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and GlaxoSmithKline and targets the Zaire strain of Ebola, the cause of the ongoing outbreak in West Africa. A trial of the same vaccine has already begun in the U.S. (AP Photo/Steve Parsons/Pool)
Professor Adrian Hill, Director of the Jenner Institute, and Chief Investigator of the trials working on the experimental Ebola vaccine poses in Oxford England Wednesday Sept. 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Steve Parsons/Pool)
View of boxes of aid for Ebola patients donated by Ghana's President and chairman of the Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS) at Conakry airport, on September 15, 2014. The UN Security Council will hold an emergency meeting on the Ebola crisis this coming week to find ways to scale up the global response to the epidemic, the US ambassador announced. The worst-ever outbreak of the deadly virus has killed more than 2,400 people in West Africa, with Liberia the region's hardest-hit country. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
A sign board showing directions to the Lumley Government Hospital, where medical doctor Olivet Buck worked before contracting the Ebola virus and passing away on Saturday near the city of Freetown, Sierra Leone, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Sierra Leone accused the World Health Organization on Monday of being “sluggish” in facilitating an evacuation of a doctor who died from Ebola before she could be sent out of the country for medical care. Dr. Olivet Buck died Saturday, hours after the U.N. health agency said it could not help evacuate her to Germany. (AP Photo/ Michael Duff)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA-SEPTEMBER 13: Amos Gibson, a MSF (Doctors Without Borders) worker washes his face with a solution of chlorine and water after he removed a protective suit that he wore while taking an ebola patient into the treatment facility on Saturday September 13, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. Since the Ebola outbreak Liberians have been living under extreme conditions as the Ebola virus worsens. (Photo by Michel du Cille/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
A child looks at a man suspected of suffering from the Ebola virus, while holding his hand over his nose, in a main street and busy part in Monrovia, Liberia, Friday, Sept. 12, 2014. A Western Kentucky University student has developed a way to track the Ebola virus outbreak. Armin Smailhodzic developed a smartphone app that uses Twitter data to track the virus. Western says the app could predict the spread of the virus.(AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
People stand around a man, right, suspected of suffering from the Ebola virus in a main street and busy part in Monrovia, Liberia, Friday, Sept. 12, 2014. A Western Kentucky University student has developed a way to track the Ebola virus outbreak. Armin Smailhodzic (smile-HO'-chih-itch) developed a smartphone app that uses Twitter data to track the virus. Western says the app could predict the spread of the virus.(AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
Children look down at a man, right, suspected of suffering from the Ebola virus in a main street and busy part in Monrovia, Liberia, Friday, Sept. 12, 2014. A Western Kentucky University student has developed a way to track the Ebola virus outbreak. Armin Smailhodzic (smile-HO'-chih-itch) developed a smartphone app that uses Twitter data to track the virus. Western says the app could predict the spread of the virus.(AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
A woman looks down as she walks past a man suspected of suffering from the Ebola virus in a main street and busy part of Monrovia, Liberia, Friday, Sept. 12, 2014. A Western Kentucky University student has developed a way to track the Ebola virus outbreak. Armin Smailhodzic developed a smartphone app that uses Twitter data to track the virus. Western says the app could predict the spread of the virus.(AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
A health worker, wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), stands on September 7, 2014 inside the high-risk area at Elwa hospital in Monrovia, which is run by the non-governmental French organization Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders -- MSF). US President Barack Obama said in an interview aired on September 7 the US military would help in the fight against fast-spreading Ebola in Africa, but warned it would be months before the epidemic slowed. The tropical virus, transmitted through contact with infected bodily fluids, has killed 2,100 people in four countries since the start of the year -- more than half of them in Liberia. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
People stand on September 7, 2014 at the entrance of Elwa hospital in Monrovia, which is run by the non-governmental French organization Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders -- MSF). US President Barack Obama said in an interview aired on September 7 the US military would help in the fight against fast-spreading Ebola in Africa, but warned it would be months before the epidemic slowed. The tropical virus, transmitted through contact with infected bodily fluids, has killed 2,100 people in four countries since the start of the year -- more than half of them in Liberia. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
Health workers, wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), are reflected in a mirror before entering a high-risk area on September 7, 2014 at Elwa hospital in Monrovia, which is run by the non-governmental French organization Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders -- MSF). US President Barack Obama said in an interview aired on September 7 the US military would help in the fight against fast-spreading Ebola in Africa, but warned it would be months before the epidemic slowed. The tropical virus, transmitted through contact with infected bodily fluids, has killed 2,100 people in four countries since the start of the year -- more than half of them in Liberia. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A health worker, wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), enters a decontamination airlock on September 7, 2014 at Elwa hospital in Monrovia, which is run by the non-governmental French organization Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders -- MSF). US President Barack Obama said in an interview aired on September 7 the US military would help in the fight against fast-spreading Ebola in Africa, but warned it would be months before the epidemic slowed. The tropical virus, transmitted through contact with infected bodily fluids, has killed 2,100 people in four countries since the start of the year -- more than half of them in Liberia. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A health worker, wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), places contaminated material in a container on September 7, 2014 at Elwa hospital in Monrovia, which is run by the non-governmental French organization Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders -- MSF). US President Barack Obama said in an interview aired on September 7 the US military would help in the fight against fast-spreading Ebola in Africa, but warned it would be months before the epidemic slowed. The tropical virus, transmitted through contact with infected bodily fluids, has killed 2,100 people in four countries since the start of the year -- more than half of them in Liberia. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A health worker, wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), burns contaminated items inside the high-risk area on September 7, 2014 at Elwa hospital in Monrovia, which is run by the non-governmental French organization Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders -- MSF). US President Barack Obama said in an interview aired on September 7 the US military would help in the fight against fast-spreading Ebola in Africa, but warned it would be months before the epidemic slowed. The tropical virus, transmitted through contact with infected bodily fluids, has killed 2,100 people in four countries since the start of the year -- more than half of them in Liberia. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A health worker, wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), burns contaminated items inside the high-risk area on September 7, 2014 at Elwa hospital in Monrovia, which is run by the non-governmental French organization Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders -- MSF). US President Barack Obama said in an interview aired on September 7 the US military would help in the fight against fast-spreading Ebola in Africa, but warned it would be months before the epidemic slowed. The tropical virus, transmitted through contact with infected bodily fluids, has killed 2,100 people in four countries since the start of the year -- more than half of them in Liberia. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
Rendi Murphree, an epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention who will soon be leaving for Monrovia, Liberia, packs for her trip at her home in Nashville, Tenn., Friday, Sept. 5, 2014. Murphree will be working at the airport in Monrovia, screening outbound passengers for the Ebola virus. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
CORRECTS TO CLARIFY DR. SACRA PRACTICES FAMILY MEDICINE- In this frame grab made from video which was released by the Nebraska State Patrol, Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, who was infected with Ebola while serving as a family doctor in Liberia is taken on a gurney to a waiting ambulance at Offutt airforce base in Bellevue, Neb., by two persons wearing protective gear, before being transported to the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Friday Sept. 5, 2014. Sacra, who served with North Carolina-based charity SIM, is the third American aid worker infected by the Ebola virus. He will begin treatment in the hospital's 10-bed special isolation unit, the largest of four such units in the U.S. (AP Photo/Nebraska State Patrol)
CORRECTS TO CLARIFY DR. SACRA PRACTICES FAMILY MEDICINE- In this frame grab made from video which was released by the Nebraska State Patrol, the plane transporting Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, who was infected with Ebola while serving as a family doctor in Liberia, sits on the tarmac at Offutt airforce base in Bellevue, Neb., Friday Sept. 5, 2014, before being transported to the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. Sacra, who served with North Carolina-based charity SIM, is the third American aid worker infected by the Ebola virus. He will begin treatment in the hospital's 10-bed special isolation unit, the largest of four such units in the U.S. (AP Photo/Nebraska State Patrol)
CORRECTS TO CLARIFY DR. SACRA PRACTICES FAMILY MEDICINE- In this frame grab made from video which was released by the Nebraska State Patrol, Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, who was infected with Ebola while serving as a family doctor in Liberia is taken on a gurney by two persons wearing protective gear, as he arrives to the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Friday Sept. 5, 2014. Sacra, who served with North Carolina-based charity SIM, is the third American aid worker infected by the Ebola virus. He will begin treatment in the hospital's 10-bed special isolation unit, the largest of four such units in the U.S. (AP Photo/Nebraska State Patrol)
The ambulance transporting Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, who was infected with Ebola while serving as an obstetrician in Liberia, arrives to the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Friday, Sept. 5, 2014. Sacra, who served with North Carolina-based charity SIM, is the third American aid worker infected by the Ebola virus. He will begin treatment in the hospital's 10-bed special isolation unit, the largest of four such units in the U.S. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
The ambulance transporting Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, who was infected with Ebola while serving as an obstetrician in Liberia, arrives to the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Friday, Sept. 5, 2014. Sacra, who served with North Carolina-based charity SIM, is the third American aid worker infected by the Ebola virus. He will begin treatment in the hospital's 10-bed special isolation unit, the largest of four such units in the U.S. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
FILE - This handout file photo taken Sept. 2, 2014, provided by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) shows A 39-year-old woman, the first participant enrolled in VRC 207, receiving a dose of the investigational NIAID/GSK Ebola vaccine at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. As West Africa struggles to contain the biggest ever outbreak of Ebola, some experts say an unusual but simple treatment might help: the blood of survivors. The evidence is mixed for using infection-fighting antibodies from survivors’ blood for Ebola, but without any licensed drugs or vaccines for the deadly disease, some say it’s worth a shot. (AP Photo/NIAID, File)
Health workers spray the body of a amputee suspected of dying from the Ebola virus with disinfectant, in a busy street in Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014. Food in countries hit by Ebola is getting more expensive and will become scarcer because many farmers won't be able to access fields, a U.N. food agency warned Tuesday. An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people, and authorities have cordoned off entire towns in an effort to halt the virus' spread. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
Health workers places the body of a man, inside a plastic body bag as he is suspected of dying due to the Ebola virus as people, rear, look on in Monrovia, Liberia, Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014. As West Africa struggles to contain the biggest ever outbreak of Ebola, some experts say an unusual but simple treatment might help: the blood of survivors. The evidence is mixed for using infection-fighting antibodies from survivors' blood for Ebola, but without any licensed drugs or vaccines for the deadly disease, some say it's worth a shot. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 18: Public health advocates stage an Ebola awareness and prevention event on August 18, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. The Liberian government and international groups are trying to convince residents of the danger and are urging people to wash their hands to help prevent the spread of the epidemic, which is spread by bodily fluids. The virus has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Health workers load the body of an amputee suspected of dying from the Ebola virus during the rain on the back of a truck, in a busy street in Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014. Food in countries hit by Ebola is getting more expensive and will become scarcer because many farmers won't be able to access fields, a U.N. food agency warned Tuesday. An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people, and authorities have cordoned off entire towns in an effort to halt the virus' spread. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
FILE-In this file photo taken on Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014, Health workers carry the body of a man, right, suspected of dying from the Ebola virus and left in the street, in the capital city of Monrovia, Liberia. Liberia’s president ordered most civil servants to stay home another month in an effort to stop the spread of the deadly Ebola virus ravaging the country, according to a statement released Monday, Sept. 1, 2014. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh, File)
Family members celebrate after Liberian authorities reopened West Point slum where tens of thousands of people were barricaded amid the country’s Ebola outbreak, in Monrovia, Liberia, Saturday, Aug. 30, 2014. The slum of 50,000 people in Liberia's capital was sealed off more than a week ago, sparking unrest and leaving many without access to food or safe water. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
A ambulance leaves the University Hospital Fann, were a man is being treated for symptoms of the Ebola virus in Dakar, Senegal, Friday, Aug. 29, 2014. A man infected with Ebola traveled to Senegal, becoming the first recorded in this country of an outbreak that has hit four other West African countries and has killed more than 1,5000 people, the Ministry of Health said Friday.(AP Photo/Jane Hahn)
In this photo taken on Friday, Aug. 29, 2014, a security guard, center left, working at the University Hospital Fann, speaks to people inside a car, as a man is treated for symptoms of the Ebola virus inside the Hospital in Dakar, Senegal. The effort to contain Ebola in Senegal is “a top priority emergency,” the World Health Organization said Sunday, as the government continued tracing everyone who came in contact with a Guinean student who has tested positive for the deadly disease in the capital, Dakar. (AP Photo/Jane Hahn)
Senegalese health minister Awa Marie Coll-Seck gives a press conference on August 29, 2014 in Dakar, to confirm the frist case of Ebola in Senegal. Senegal confirmed its first case of Ebola, as the country's health minister announced that a young Guinean had tested positive for the deadly virus. AFP PHOTO SEYLLOU (Photo credit should read SEYLLOU/AFP/Getty Images)
DONGGUAN, CHINA - AUGUST 27: (CHINA OUT) Quarantine officers attend an excercise to prevent Ebola virus on August 27, 2014 in Dongguan, Guangdong province of China. An Ebola-preventing exercise were held at Dongguan on Wednesday. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
ZHANGJIAJIE, CHINA - AUGUST 27: (CHINA OUT) Quarantine officers attend an excercise to prevent Ebola virus on August 27, 2014 in Zhangjiajie, Hunan province of China. An Ebola-preventing exercise were held at Zhangjiajie Hehua International Airport. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images)
A security agent controls the temperature of a woman at the entrance of the port of Monrovia on August 29, 2014. The World Health Organization said yesterday that the number of Ebola cases was increasing rapidly and could exceed 20,000 before the virus is brought under control, as the death toll topped 1,500. AFP PHOTO/DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A health worker, wearing a protective suit, conducts an ebola prevention drill at the port in Monrovia on August 29, 2014. The World Health Organization said yesterday that the number of Ebola cases was increasing rapidly and could exceed 20,000 before the virus is brought under control, as the death toll topped 1,500. AFP PHOTO/DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
Health workers, wearing a protective suit, conduct an ebola prevention drill at the port in Monrovia on August 29, 2014. The World Health Organization said yesterday that the number of Ebola cases was increasing rapidly and could exceed 20,000 before the virus is brought under control, as the death toll topped 1,500. AFP PHOTO/DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
Health workers, wearing protective suits, conduct an ebola prevention drill at the port in Monrovia on August 29, 2014. The World Health Organization said yesterday that the number of Ebola cases was increasing rapidly and could exceed 20,000 before the virus is brought under control, as the death toll topped 1,500. AFP PHOTO/DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
GENEVA, SWITZERLAND - AUGUST 28: Bruce Aylward, WHO Assistant Director-General, speaks during a press conference about the WHO briefing on the Ebola roadmap at WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland on August 28, 2014. (Photo by Murat Unlu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Health agents check a passenger leaving Liberia at the Roberts International Airport near Monrovia on Agust 27, 2014. Ebola-hit nations met for crisis talks on August 28, 2014 as the death toll topped 1,500 and the World Health Organization warned that the number of cases could exceed 20,000 before the outbreak is stemmed. The United Nations vowed on August 23 to play a 'strong role' in helping Liberia and its neighbours fight a deadly outbreak of Ebola in west Africa, which it said could take months to bring it under control. Liberia has been particularly hard hit by the epidemic that has swept relentlessly across the region since March, accounting for almost half of the 1,427 deaths. AFP PHOTO / ZOOM DOSSO (Photo credit should read ZOOM DOSSO/AFP/Getty Images)
A health worker, wearing a protective suit, disinfects a house during an ebola prevention drill at the port in Monrovia on August 29, 2014. The World Health Organization said yesterday that the number of Ebola cases was increasing rapidly and could exceed 20,000 before the virus is brought under control, as the death toll topped 1,500. AFP PHOTO/DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
Health workers take off their protective suits after finishing disinfecting areas at the Pita hospital on August 25, 2014. The worst-ever Ebola epidemic could cut economic output in four west African countries by between 1 percent and 1.5 percent of gross economic product, the African Development Bank said Tuesday. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
KENEMA, SIERRA LEONE - AUGUST 26: Members of a volunteer medical team wear special uniforms for the burial of 7 people, sterilized after dying due to the Ebola virus, in Kptema graveyard in Kenema, Sierra Leone on August 26, 2014. In recent months, Ebola a contagious disease for which there is no known treatment or cure has claimed at least 1429 lives in West Africa, mostly in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia. (Photo by Mohammed Elshamy/Anadolu Agency/Gett Images)
KENEMA, SIERRA LEONE - AUGUST 26: Members of a volunteer medical team wearing special uniforms, carry the body of an Ebola victim during the burial of 7 people died due to the Ebola virus, in Kptema graveyard in Kenema, Sierra Leone on August 26, 2014. In recent months, Ebola a contagious disease for which there is no known treatment or cure has claimed at least 1429 lives in West Africa, mostly in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia. (Photo by Mohammed Elshamy/Anadolu Agency/Gett Images)
KENEMA, SIERRA LEONE - AUGUST 26: Members of a volunteer medical team wear special uniforms for the burial of 7 people, sterilized after dying due to the Ebola virus, in Kptema graveyard in Kenema, Sierra Leone on August 26, 2014. In recent months, Ebola a contagious disease for which there is no known treatment or cure has claimed at least 1429 lives in West Africa, mostly in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia. (Photo by Mohammed Elshamy/Anadolu Agency/Gett Images)
Health workers take off their protective suits as they finish their shifts at the Pita hospital on August 25, 2014. The worst-ever Ebola epidemic could cut economic output in four west African countries by between 1 percent and 1.5 percent of gross economic product, the African Development Bank said Tuesday. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY CHRISTOPHE KOFFI - A woman salts water prior to give a bath to her child, on August 25, 2014 in a suburb of Abidjan, relying on a rumor that was spread in the area claiming that salted water helps to fight against the Ebola virus. AFP PHOTO / ISSOUF SANOGO (Photo credit should read ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on August 25, 2014 in Monrovia shows nurses wearing a protective suit searching for a man infected with the Ebola virus to escort him to a hospital in Monrovia. The United Nations vowed on August 23 to play a 'strong role' in helping Liberia and its neighbours fight a deadly outbreak of Ebola in west Africa, which it said could take months to bring it under control. Liberia has been particularly hard hit by the epidemic that has swept relentlessly across the region since March, accounting for almost half of the 1,427 deaths. AFP PHOTO / ZOOM DOSSO (Photo credit should read ZOOM DOSSO/AFP/Getty Images)
KENEMA, SIERRA LEONE - AUGUST 24: A group of young volunteers who wore special uniforms to carry the bodies of people, sterilized after dying due to the Ebola virus, to a car ahead of their burials in Kptema graveyard, return Kenema State Hospital after their work in Kenema, Sierra Leone on August 24, 2014. People work for 6 dollars per a day in burial and sterilizing works in Kenema where the infection of the virus is mostly seen. (Photo by Mohammed Elshamy/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
People gather around a man suspected of dying from the Ebola virus, in one of the main streets on the outskirts of the city center of Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014. The Ebola virus has the “upper hand” in an outbreak that has killed more than 1,400 people in West Africa, a top American health official has said, but experts have the tools to stop it.(AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
A man reads a warning on the door of a vehicle regarding the deadly Ebola virus in Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014. The Ebola virus has the “upper hand” in an outbreak that has killed more than 1,400 people in West Africa, a top American health official has said, but experts have the tools to stop it.(AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
A man in a truck looks down on a man suspected of dying from the Ebola virus, in one of the main streets on the outskirts of the city center of Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014. The Ebola virus has the “upper hand” in an outbreak that has killed more than 1,400 people in West Africa, a top American health official has said, but experts have the tools to stop it.(AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
NEW KRU TOWN, LIBERIA - AUGUST 18: Local residents listen as UNICEF health workers speak about Ebola prevention on August 18, 2014 in New Kru Town, Liberia. UNICEF is canvassing communities in and around the capital, going house to house and urging residents to wash their hands to help prevent the spread of the epidemic, which is spread by bodily fluids. The virus has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
A health worker, wearing a protective suit, conducts an ebola prevention drill at the port in Monrovia on August 29, 2014. The World Health Organization said yesterday that the number of Ebola cases was increasing rapidly and could exceed 20,000 before the virus is brought under control, as the death toll topped 1,500. AFP PHOTO/DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 18: Public health advocates stage an Ebola awareness and prevention event on August 18, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. The Liberian government and international groups are trying to convince residents of the danger and are urging people to wash their hands to help prevent the spread of the epidemic, which is spread by bodily fluids. The virus has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 17: A Liberian burial team carefully puts on protective clothing before retrieving the body of an Ebola victim from his home on August 17, 2014 near Monrovia, Liberia. The epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 17: A Liberian burial team wearing protective clothing retrieves the body of a 60-year-old Ebola victim from his home on August 17, 2014 near Monrovia, Liberia. The epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 17: Workers prepare the new Doctors Without Borders (MSF), Ebola treatment center on August 17, 2014 near Monrovia, Liberia. The facility initially has 120 beds, making it the largest such center for Ebola treatment and isolation in history, and MSF plans to expand it to a 350-bed capacity. Tents, beds and much of the medical supplies at the center were provided by UNICEF. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 17: Hanah Siafa lies with her daughter Josephine, 10, while hoping to enter the new Doctors Without Borders (MSF), Ebola treatment center on August 17, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. The facility initially has 120 beds, making it the largest such facility for Ebola treatment and isolation in history, and MSF plans to expand it to a 350-bed capacity. Tents at the center were provided by UNICEF. The virus has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 17: Doctors Without Borders (MSF), press officer Tim Shenk opens a morgue tent at the new Ebola treatment center on August 17, 2014 near Monrovia, Liberia. The facility initially has 120 beds, making it the largest such center for Ebola treatment and isolation in history, and MSF plans to expand it to a 350-bed capacity. Tents, beds and much of the medical supplies at the center were provided by UNICEF. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 17: Doctors Without Borders (MSF), staffer Brett Adamson, from Australia, briefs local MSF staff on procedures at the new Ebola treatment center on August 17, 2014 near Monrovia, Liberia. The facility initially has 120 beds, making it the largest such center for Ebola treatment and isolation in history, and MSF plans to expand it to a 350-bed capacity. Tents, beds and much of the medical supplies at the center were provided by UNICEF. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 17: Supplies await arrivals to the new Doctors Without Borders (MSF), Ebola treatment center on August 17, 2014 near Monrovia, Liberia. The facility initially has 120 beds, making it the largest such center for Ebola treatment and isolation in history, and MSF plans to expand it to a 350-bed capacity. Tents, beds and much of the medical supplies at the center were provided by UNICEF. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 17: Hanah Siafa lies with her children Josephine, 10, and Elija, 6, while hoping to enter the new Doctors Without Borders (MSF), Ebola treatment center on August 17, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. The newly built facility initially has 120 beds, making it the largest such facility for Ebola treatment and isolation in history and MSF plans to expand it to a 350-bed capacity. Tents, beds and much of the medical supplies at the center were provided by UNICEF. The virus has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 17: Neighbors watch as a Liberian burial team retrieves the body of a 60-year-old Ebola victim from his home on August 17, 2014 near Monrovia, Liberia. The epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 17: Sick women rest while hoping to enter the new Doctors Without Borders (MSF), Ebola treatment center on August 17, 2014 near Monrovia, Liberia. The newly built facility initially has 120 beds, making it the largest such center for Ebola treatment and isolation in history and MSF plans to expand it to a 350-bed capacity. The virus has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 17: A Liberian burial team wearing protective clothing retrieves the body of a 60-year-old Ebola victim in his home on August 17, 2014 near Monrovia, Liberia. The epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 16: A fruit vendor walks through a market after protesters drove out an Ebola burial team who had come to collect the bodies of four people who had died overnight in the West Point slum on August 16, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. A crowd of several hundred local residents, chanting, 'No Ebola in West Point,' drove away the burial team and their police escort, who fired warning shots in the air. The mob then forced open an Ebola isolation ward and took the patients out, many saying that the Ebola epidemic is a hoax. The isolation center, a closed primary school originally built by USAID, was being used by the Liberian health ministry to temporarily isolate people suspected of carrying the virus. Some 10 patients had 'escaped' the building the night before, according to a nurse, as the center had no medicine to treat them. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries, with Liberia now having the most deaths. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 16: People make her opinion known after protesters drove out an Ebola burial team who had come to collect the bodies of four people who had died overnight in the West Point slum on August 16, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. A crowd of several hundred local residents, chanting, 'No Ebola in West Point,' drove away the burial team and their police escort, who fired warning shots in the air. The mob then forced open an Ebola isolation ward and took the patients out, many saying that the Ebola epidemic is a hoax. The isolation center, a closed primary school originally built by USAID, was being used by the Liberian health ministry to temporarily isolate people suspected of carrying the virus. Some 10 patients had 'escaped' the building the night before, according to a nurse, as the center had no medicine to treat them. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries, with Liberia now having the most deaths. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 17: Hanah Siafa walks in the rain with her children Josephine, 10, and Elija, 6, while waiting to enter the new Doctors Without Borders (MSF), Ebola treatment center on August 17, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. The newly built facility will initially have 120 beds, making it the largest such facility for Ebola treatment and isolation in history and MSF plans to expand it to a 350-bed capacity. The virus has killed more than 1,000 people in four African countries, and Liberia now has had more deaths than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
A girls suspected of being infected with the Ebola virus has her temperature checked at the government hospital in Kenema, Sierra Leone, on August 16, 2014. Kenema hospital estimates that 15 of their staff have died treating ebola patients, at least 12 of them were nurses. The death toll from an Ebola outbreak that began at the start of the year stands at 1,145 in four afflicted west African countries: Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria. Kailahun, the traditional home of around 30,000 mainly Mende tribespeople, and Kenema account for the lion's share of Sierra Leone's 810 cases and 384 deaths. AFP PHOTO/CARL DE SOUZA (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 16: A family (C), leaves an Ebola isolation center after a mob forced open the gates of the facility in the West Point slum on August 16, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. A crowd of several hundred people, chanting, 'No Ebola in West Point,' opened the gates and took out the patients. Many in the crowd said that the Ebola epidemic is a hoax. The center, a closed primary school originally built by USAID, was being used by the Liberian Health Ministry to temporarily isolate people suspected of carrying the virus. Some 10 patients had 'escaped' the building the night before, according to a nurse there, as the center had no medicine to treat them. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries, with Liberia now having the most deaths. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 16: A mob overruns an Ebola isolation center in the West Point slum on August 16, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. A crowd of several hundred people, chanting, 'No Ebola in West Point,' crashed through the gates and took out the patients, saying that the Ebola epidemic is a hoax. The center, a closed primary school originally built by USAID, was being used by the Liberian health ministry to temporarily isolate people suspected of carrying the virus. Some 10 patients had 'escaped' the building the night before, as the center had no medicine to treat them. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries, with Liberia now having the most deaths. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MSF medical workers put on protective clothing at an MSF Ebola treatment facility in Kailahun, on August 15, 2014. Kailahun along with Kenama district is at the epicentre of the world's worst Ebola outbreak. The World Health Organisation (WHO) revealed that the latest death toll from the Ebola virus in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria had claimed more than1000 lives. Health Organisations are looking into the possible use of experimental drugs to combat the latest outbreak in West Africa. AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
MSF medical workers put on protective clothing at an MSF Ebola treatment facility in Kailahun, on August 15, 2014. Kailahun along with Kenama district is at the epicentre of the world's worst Ebola outbreak. The World Health Organisation (WHO) revealed that the latest death toll from the Ebola virus in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria had claimed more than1000 lives. Health Organisations are looking into the possible use of experimental drugs to combat the latest outbreak in West Africa. AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
An MSF medical worker, wearing protective clothing at an MSF Ebola treatment facility in Kailahun, on August 15, 2014. Kailahun along with Kenama district is at the epicentre of the world's worst Ebola outbreak. The World Health Organisation (WHO) revealed that the latest death toll from the Ebola virus in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria had claimed more than1000 lives. Health Organisations are looking into the possible use of experimental drugs to combat the latest outbreak in West Africa. AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
An MSF medical worker, wearing protective clothing relays patient details and updates behind a barrier to a colleague at an MSF facility in Kailahun, on August 15, 2014. Kailahun along with Kenama district is at the epicentre of the world's worst Ebola outbreak. The World Health Organisation (WHO) revealed that the latest death toll from the Ebola virus in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria had claimed more than1000 lives. Health Organisations are looking into the possible use of experimental drugs to combat the latest outbreak in West Africa. AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 15: Umu Fambulle stands over her husband Ibrahim after he staggered and fell, knocking him unconscious in an Ebola ward on August 15, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. People suspected of contracting the Ebola virus are being sent by Liberian health workers to the center, a closed primary school originally built by USAID. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 15: Umu Fambulle tries to help her husband Ibrahim after he fell and was knocked unconscious in an Ebola ward on August 15, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. People suspected of contracting the Ebola virus are being sent by Liberian health workers to the center, a closed primary school originally built by USAID. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
An MSF medical worker at an MSF Ebola treatment facility in Kailahun, on August 14, 2014. Kailahun along with Kenama district is at the epicentre of the world's worst Ebola outbreak. The World Health Organisation (WHO) revealed that the latest death toll from the Ebola virus in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria had claimed more than1000 lives. Health Organisations are looking into the possible use of experimental drugs to combat the latest outbreak in West Africa. AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
Soldiers of UNOCI (United Nations Operation in Cote d'Ivoire) wear a face mask to protect themselves from the Ebola virus as they patrol in Kandopleu, on August 14, 2014 near Biankouma near the border with Guinea and Liberia. Ivory Coast announced on August 11, 2014 that it has banned all flights from countries hit by Ebola as part of steps to prevent the deadly virus from reaching the west African nation. AFP PHOTO / ISSOUF SANOGO (Photo credit should read ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images)
Sierra Leone government burial team members wearing protective clothing disinfect a coffin at the MSF facility in Kailahun, on August 14, 2014. Kailahun along with Kenama district is at the epicentre of the world's worst Ebola outbreak. The World Health Organisation (WHO) revealed that the latest death toll from the Ebola virus in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria had claimed more than1000 lives. Health Organisations are looking into the possible use of experimental drugs to combat the latest outbreak in West Africa. AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 14: A Liberian health department burial team disinfects their protective clothing after retreiving the body of a woman suspected of dying of the Ebola virus on August 14, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. Teams of undertakers wearing protective clothing are collecting bodies from all over the capital Monrovia, where the spread of the highly contagious Ebola virus has been called catastrophic. The epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 14: A girl sells soap as women pray for an end of the Ebola epidemic on August 14, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. The epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Medicins Sans Frontieres (MSF) medical workers wearing protective clothing carry the body bag of an Ebola victim at the MSF facility in Kailahun, on August 14, 2014. Kailahun along with Kenama district is at the epicentre of the world's worst Ebola outbreak. The World Health Organisation (WHO) revealed that the latest death toll from the Ebola virus in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria had claimed more than1000 lives. Health Organisations are looking into the possible use of experimental drugs to combat the latest outbreak in West Africa. AFP PHOTO / CARL DE SOUZA (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 14: A man lies in a newly-opened Ebola isolation center set up by the Liberian health ministry in a closed school on August 14, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. People suspected of contracting the Ebola virus are being sent to such centers in the capital Monrovia where the spread of the highly contagious and deadly Ebola virus has been called catastrophic. The epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Strechers carry a man on a stretcher in an ambulance on August 14, 2014 at the district hospital of Biankouma, during a simulation operation organized by the Ivory Coast Health Ministry to train medical staff to deal with potential patients with Ebola. US President Barack Obama called his counterparts in Liberia and Sierra Leone on August 14 to discuss the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the White House said. AFP PHOTO / ISSOUF SANOGO (Photo credit should read ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 14: A burial team from the Liberian health department removes the body of a woman suspected of dying of the Ebola virus from her home on August 14, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. Teams are picking up bodies from all over the capital of Monrovia, where the spread of the Ebola virus has been called catastrophic. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries and has overwhelmed the Liberian health system. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 14: A relative weeps as a health department burial team prepares to enter the home of a woman suspected of dying of the Ebola virus on August 14, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. Teams are picking up bodies from all over the capital of Monrovia, where the spread of the Ebola virus has been called catastrophic. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries and has overwhelmed the Liberian health system. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 14: The body of a woman suspected of dying of the Ebola virus lies on her bed after being sprayed with disinfectant on August 14, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. Teams are picking up bodies from all over the capital of Monrovia, where the spread of the Ebola virus has been called catastrophic. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries and has overwhelmed the Liberian health system. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
A fresh bushmeat roasts at the Ajegunle-Ikorodu market in Lagos on August 13, 2014. Infected animals such as chimpanzees, gorillas, fruit bats, monkeys, forest antelope and porcupines found ill or dead or in the rainforest are being considered to be the natural host of the Ebola virus. The outbreak of the deadly Ebola feverhas rekindled concerns about the health risks of age-old African hunting and eating traditions that bring humans into close contact with wild forest animals. The virus has claimed more than 1,000 lives in west Africa. AFP PHOTO/PIUS UTOMI EKPEI (Photo credit should read PIUS UTOMI EKPEI/AFP/Getty Images)
Nurses and doctors wearing protective suits and masks perform a drill at Tires Aerodrome designed to transport people infected with the Ebola virus in Cascais, outskirts of Lisbon, on August 14, 2014. Portugal's authorities take measures against Ebola virus which has killed more than 1,000 people since early this year, according to the World Health Organization. AFP PHOTO / PATRICIA DE MELO MOREIRA (Photo credit should read PATRICIA DE MELO MOREIRA/AFP/Getty Images)
An agent of the national public health institute controls the temperature of a man at the airport, in Abidjan on August 12, 2014, as part of protective measures against the Ebola virus. The Ivory Coast announced on the eve that it has banned all flights from countries hit by Ebola as part of steps to prevent the deadly virus from reaching the west African nation. AFP PHOTO/ SIA KAMBOU (Photo credit should read SIA KAMBOU/AFP/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - AUGUST 11: A nurse helps a doctor for tropical medicine and a nurse take off their isolation suits following a demonstration for the media of ebola treatment capabilities at Station 59 at Charite hospital on August 11, 2014 in Berlin, Germany. The specialized quarantine unit at Station 59 is among a handful of facilities in Germany nationwide that are capable of handling ebola cases. According to media reports a German medical student currently in Ruanda is showing signs of the disease, though should he in fact have ebola it is so far unclear whether he would be flown to Germany for treatment. The disease has so far claimed over 1,000 lives in western Africa in recent weeks. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
In this photo taken Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, health worker wearing protective clothing and equipment, out of fear for the deadly Ebola virus, sit at a desk at the Kenema Government Hospital situated in the Eastern Province in Kenema, 300 kilometers, (186 miles) from the capital city of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Over the decades, Ebola cases have been confirmed in 10 African countries, including Congo where the disease was first reported in 1976. But until this year, Ebola had never come to West Africa. (AP Photo/ Michael Duff)
In this photo taken Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, health workers, center rear, screen people for the deadly Ebola virus before entering the Kenema Government Hospital in Kenema, 300 kilometers, (186 miles) from the capital city of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Over the decades, Ebola cases have been confirmed in 10 African countries, including Congo where the disease was first reported in 1976. But until this year, Ebola had never come to West Africa. (AP Photo/ Michael Duff)
In this image taken Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014 a large billboard promoting the washing of hands to prevent the spread of the deadly Ebola virus in Monrovia, Liberia. Over the decades, Ebola cases have been confirmed in 10 African countries, including Congo where the disease was first reported in 1976. But until this year, Ebola had never come to West Africa. (AP Photo/Jonathan Paye-Layleh)
In this image taken Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014 a banner adorns a street as the deadly Ebola virus spread in Monrovia, Liberia. Over the decades, Ebola cases have been confirmed in 10 African countries, including Congo where the disease was first reported in 1976. But until this year, Ebola had never come to West Africa. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
In this photo taken Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, a health worker wearing a protective clothing spray disinfectant against the deadly Ebola virus at the Kenema Government Hospital in Kenema, 300 kilometers, (186 miles) from the capital city of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Over the decades, Ebola cases have been confirmed in 10 African countries, including Congo where the disease was first reported in 1976. But until this year, Ebola had never come to West Africa. (AP Photo/ Michael Duff)
In this photo taken Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, health workers wearing protective clothing and equipment against the deadly Ebola virus sit at the Kenema Government Hospital situated in the Eastern Province around 300 km, (186 miles) from the capital city of Freetown in Kenema, Sierra Leone. Over the decades, Ebola cases have been confirmed in 10 African countries, including Congo where the disease was first reported in 1976. But until this year, Ebola had never come to West Africa. (AP Photo/ Michael Duff)
A man's temperature is measured before he is allowed into a business center, as fear of the deadly Ebola virus spreads through the city of Monrovia, Liberia, Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014. Over the decades, Ebola cases have been confirmed in 10 African countries, including Congo where the disease was first reported in 1976. But until this year, Ebola had never come to West Africa. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Dr. Tom Frieden testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014, before the House subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations hearing on "Combating the Ebola Threat." (AP Photo/Molly Riley)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Dr. Tom Frieden testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014, before the House subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations hearing on "Combating the Ebola Threat." (AP Photo/Molly Riley)
Augustine Kpehe Ngafuan, Liberia Minister of Foreign Affairs, looks out from his seat on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014, during a hearing on the Ebola threat before the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)
Members and supporters of the Parti Democratique Senegalais (PDS, Senegal's Democratic Party) hold poster showing their leader, former Senegalese president Abdoulaye Wade and his son Karim, and a placard reading 'Macky Ebola Sall' (referring to the current president and the deadly virus) as they rally in front of the party's headquarters in Dakar on April 23, 2014. Senegal's former president Abdoulaye Wade was due to return home on Wednesday after two years abroad following his election defeat, with his son facing jail for corruption. Wade, who held power from 2000 to 2012, moved to France after suffering a bitter defeat to current President Macky Sall, his former prime minister turned arch-rival, in March 2012. SEYLLOU/AFP/Getty Images
Health workers speak to relatives of peolpe infected with Ebola at an isolation center at Donka Hospital in Conakry on April 14, 2014. Guinea's Foreign Minister Francois Fall said on April 14 that the west African country had brought the spread of the deadly Ebola virus under control after more than 100 people have died. The outbreak is one of the most deadly, with 168 cases 'clinically compatible' with Ebola virus disease reported, including 108 deaths, the World Health Organization (WHO) said in its latest update on April 14. CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images
Health workers walk in an isolation center for people infected with Ebola at Donka Hospital in Conakry on April 14, 2014. Guinea's Foreign Minister Francois Fall said on April 14 that the west African country had brought the spread of the deadly Ebola virus under control after more than 100 people have died. The outbreak is one of the most deadly, with 168 cases 'clinically compatible' with Ebola virus disease reported, including 108 deaths, the World Health Organization (WHO) said in its latest update on April 14. CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images
An ambulance transporting a second American missionary stricken with Ebola arrives at Emory University Hospital, Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014, in Atlanta. Nancy Writebol is expected to be admitted to Emory University Hospital on Tuesday, where she will join another U.S. aid worker, Dr. Kent Brantly, in a special isolation unit. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
An ambulance transporting Nancy Writebol, an American missionary stricken with Ebola, arrives at Emory University Hospital, Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014, in Atlanta. Writebol is expected to be admitted to Emory University Hospital on Tuesday, where she will join another U.S. aid worker, Dr. Kent Brantly, in a special isolation unit. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
An ambulance transporting Nancy Writebol, an American missionary stricken with Ebola, arrives at Emory University Hospital, Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014, in Atlanta. Writebol is expected to be admitted to Emory University Hospital on Tuesday, where she will join another U.S. aid worker, Dr. Kent Brantly, in a special isolation unit. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
An ambulance transporting Nancy Writebol, an American missionary stricken with Ebola, arrives at Emory University Hospital, Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014, in Atlanta. Writebol is expected to be admitted to Emory on Tuesday, where she will join another U.S. aid worker, Dr. Kent Brantly, in a special isolation unit. (AP Photo/Jason Getz)
An ambulance transporting Nancy Writebol, an American missionary stricken with Ebola, arrives at Emory University Hospital, Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014, in Atlanta. Writebol is expected to be admitted to Emory on Tuesday, where she will join another U.S. aid worker, Dr. Kent Brantly, in a special isolation unit. (AP Photo/Jason Getz)
A woman in protective clothing drives an ambulance after departing Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Marietta., Ga., en route Emory University Hospital in Atlanta Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. A specially outfitted plane carrying Dr. Kent Brantly from West Africa arrived at a military base in Georgia. Brantly was taken to the Atlanta hospital. Another American with Ebola is expected to join him at the hospital in a few days. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Hospital workers pass police officers guarding an entrance to Emory University Hospital after an ambulance arrived transporting an American that was infected with the Ebola virus, Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014, in Atlanta. A specially outfitted plane carrying Dr. Kent Brantly from West Africa arrived at a military base in Georgia. Brantly was taken to the Atlanta hospital. Another American with Ebola is expected to join him at the hospital in a few days. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Dr. David Mcray, left, listens to a question during a news conference with Dr. Jason Brewington, center, and Dr. Darrin D'Agostino about fellow doctor Kent Brantly Monday, July 28, 2014, in Fort Worth, Texas. Brantly is one of two American aid workers that have tested positive for the Ebola virus while working to combat an outbreak of the deadly disease at a hospital in Liberia. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
In this 2014 photo provided by the Samaritan's Purse aid organization, Dr. Kent Brantly, left, treats an Ebola patient at the Samaritan's Purse Ebola Case Management Center in Monrovia, Liberia. On Saturday, July 26, 2014, the North Carolina-based aid organization said Brantly tested positive for the disease and was being treated at a hospital in Monrovia. (AP Photo/Samaritan's Purse)
Health workers wearing protective suits walk in an isolation center for people infected with Ebola at Donka Hospital in Conakry on April 14, 2014. Guinea's Foreign Minister Francois Fall said on April 14 that the west African country had brought the spread of the deadly Ebola virus under control after more than 100 people have died. The outbreak is one of the most deadly, with 168 cases 'clinically compatible' with Ebola virus disease reported, including 108 deaths, the World Health Organization (WHO) said in its latest update on April 14. CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images
Members of the Guinean Red Cross speak with a resident during an awareness campaign on the Ebola virus on April 11, 2014 in Conakry. Guinea has been hit by the most severe strain of the virus, known as Zaire Ebola, which has had a fatality rate of up to 90 percent in past outbreaks, and for which there is no vaccine, cure or even specific treatment. The World Health Organization (WHO) has described west Africa's first outbreak among humans as one of the most challenging since the virus emerged in 1976 in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo. CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images
A woman prepares food at a 'maquis,' a small African restaurant, in Kobakro, outside Abidjan, which now serves various types of meat instead of bushmeat, on April 8, 2014. The Ministry of Health has asked Ivorians, 'particularly fond of porcupine and agouti,' a small rodent, to avoid consuming or handling bushmeat, as an unprecedented Ebola epidemic hit West Africa, claiming more than 90 lives. The virus can spread to animal primates and humans who handle infected meat -- a risk given the informal trade in 'bushmeat' in forested central and west Africa. Photo credit should read ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images
People walk past the sign of a 'maquis,' a small African restaurant which serves bushmeat, in Kobakro, outside Abidjan, on April 8, 2014. The Ministry of Health has asked Ivorians, 'particularly fond of porupine and agouti,' a small rodent, to avoid consuming or handling the meat, as an unprecedented Ebola epidemic hit West Africa, claiming more than 90 lives. The virus can spread to animal primates and humans who handle infected meat -- a risk given the informal trade in 'bushmeat' in forested central and west Africa. ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images
Staff of the 'Doctors without Borders' ('Medecin sans frontieres') medical aid organisation bury the body of a person killed by viral haemorrhagic fever, at a center for victims of the Ebola virus in Guekedou, on April 1, 2014. The viral haemorrhagic fever epidemic raging in Guinea is caused by several viruses which have similar symptoms -- the deadliest and most feared of which is Ebola. SEYLLOU/AFP/Getty Images
Staff of the 'Doctors without Borders' ('Medecin sans frontieres') medical aid organisation carry the body of a person killed by viral haemorrhagic fever, at a center for victims of the Ebola virus in Guekedou, on April 1, 2014. The viral haemorrhagic fever epidemic raging in Guinea is caused by several viruses which have similar symptoms -- the deadliest and most feared of which is Ebola. SEYLLOU/AFP/Getty Images
A nurse of the 'Doctors without Borders' ('Medecin sans frontieres') medical aid organisation examines a patient in the in-take area at a center for victims of the Ebola virus in Guekedou, on April 1, 2014. The viral haemorrhagic fever epidemic raging in Guinea is caused by several viruses which have similar symptoms -- the deadliest and most feared of which is Ebola. SEYLLOU/AFP/Getty Images
A worker transports dirt in a wheelbarrow at a center for victims of the Ebola virus in Guekedou, on April 1, 2014. The viral hemmorrhagic fever epidemic raging in Guinea is caused by several viruses which have similar symptoms -- the deadliest and most feared of which is Ebola. SEYLLOU/AFP/Getty Images
Guinean hospital staff and staff of the 'Doctors without Borders' ('Medecin sans frontieres') medical aid organisation listen to a nurse from the aid organisation speak on April 1, 2014, in Guekedou, during a talk about viral hemorrhagic fever. The viral hemorrhagic fever epidemic raging in Guinea is caused by several viruses which have similar symptoms -- the deadliest and most feared of which is Ebola. SEYLLOU/AFP/Getty Images
Nigerian health officials wait to screen passengers at the arrival hall of Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos, Nigeria, Monday, Aug. 4, 2014. Nigerian authorities on Monday confirmed a second case of Ebola in Africa's most populous country, an alarming setback as officials across the region battle to stop the spread of a disease that has killed more than 700 people. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
A Senegalese hygienist demonstrates how to protect oneself against the Ebola virus on April 8, 2014 at Dakar airport, during a visit of the Senegalese health minister to check the safety measures put in place to fight against the virus' spread in western Africa. West Africa's Ebola outbreak is among the 'most challenging' ever to strike since the disease emerged four decades ago, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on April 8, as the suspected death toll from the virus hit 111. SEYLLOU/AFP/Getty Images
A Nigerian health official wearing a protective mask waits to screen passengers at the arrivals hall of Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos, Nigeria, Monday, Aug. 4, 2014. Nigerian authorities on Monday confirmed a second case of Ebola in Africa's most populous country, an alarming setback as officials across the region battle to stop the spread of a disease that has killed more than 700 people. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
Senegal's health minister Awa Marie Coll Seck (2nd L) listens to Alioune Fall (R), chief doctor of Dakar airport, as she visits Dakar airport on April 8, 2014 to check the safety measures put in place to fight against the spread of the Ebola virus in western Africa. West Africa's Ebola outbreak is among the 'most challenging' ever to strike since the disease emerged four decades ago, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on April 8, as the suspected death toll from the virus hit 111. SEYLLOU/AFP/Getty Images
A Nigerian health official uses a thermometer on a worker at the arrivals hall of Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos, Nigeria, Monday, Aug. 4, 2014. Nigerian authorities on Monday confirmed a second case of Ebola in Africa's most populous country, an alarming setback as officials across the region battle to stop the spread of a disease that has killed more than 700 people. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
Passengers are seen at the Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos, Nigeria, Monday, Aug. 4, 2014. Nigerian authorities on Monday confirmed a second case of Ebola in Africa's most populous country, an alarming setback as officials across the region battle to stop the spread of a disease that has killed more than 700 people. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
A man reads a local newspaper with headline news about a Lagos female doctor contracts Ebola Virus, in Lagos, Nigeria, Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. Lagos State Health Commissioner Jide Idris announced Tuesday that eight people are being kept in quarantine with symptoms of Ebola. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
Lagos State Health Commissioner Jide Idris, left, speaks during a news conference in Lagos, Nigeria, Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014, as he announces that eight people are being kept in quarantine with symptoms of Ebola and they had primary contact with Patrick Sawyer, who flew into Lagos and died of the disease in July. Idris reported that others may have been infected in Nigeria's commercial capital before doctors isolated Liberian-American Sawyer, about 24 hours after he arrived at the hospital. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
Passengers queue for their passport document check by immigration officers at the arrivals hall of Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos, Nigeria, Monday, Aug. 4, 2014. Nigerian authorities on Monday confirmed a second case of Ebola in Africa's most populous country, an alarming setback as officials across the African region battle to stop the spread of the disease that has killed more than 700 people. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
A Nigerian health official wearing a protective suit waits to screen passengers at the arrivals hall of Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos, Nigeria, Monday, Aug. 4, 2014. Nigerian authorities on Monday confirmed a second case of Ebola in Africa's most populous country, an alarming setback as officials across the region battle to stop the spread of a disease that has killed more than 700 people. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
Jeremy Writebol holds a photograph of his mother and father before an interview with a reporter in Wichita, Kan., Sunday, Aug. 3, 2014. Jeremy is the son of Nancy Writebol, a missionary stricken with Ebola. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
A view of gloves and boots used by medical staff, drying in the sun, at a center for victims of the Ebola virus in Guekedou, on April 1, 2014. The viral haemorrhagic fever epidemic raging in Guinea is caused by several viruses which have similar symptoms -- the deadliest and most feared of which is Ebola. SEYLLOU/AFP/Getty Images
A health specialist prepares filtered water at an isolation ward for patients at the Doctors Without Borders facility in Guékedou, southern Guinea. Guinea's President Alpha Conde warned of a 'health emergency' as authorities raced to contain a spiraling Ebola epidemic which has killed 78 people and prompted neighboring Senegal to close its border. SEYLLOU/AFP/Getty Images
Health workers teach people about the Ebola virus and how to prevent infection, in Conakry, Guinea, Monday, March 31, 2014. Health authorities in Guinea are facing an "unprecedented epidemic" of Ebola, the international aid group Doctors Without Borders warned Monday as the death toll from the disease that causes severe bleeding reached 78. The outbreak of Ebola in Guinea poses challenges never seen in previous outbreaks that involved "more remote locations as opposed to urban areas," said Doctors Without Borders. (AP Photo/ Youssouf Bah)
In this photo provide by MSF, Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders), taken on Friday, March 28, 2014, healthcare workers from the organisation, react, as they prepare isolation and treatment areas for their Ebola, hemorrhagic fever operations, in Gueckedou, Guinea. Health officials in the West African nation of Guinea say they're now treating eight cases of Ebola in the capital. Dr. Sakoba Keita, a spokesman for the health ministry, announced on national television the virus had reached the city of 3 million. Keita said Friday, March 28, 2014, at least 70 people have died in the country's south since the Ebola outbreak began last week. (AP Photo/Kjell Gunnar Beraas, MSF)
A man reads a local newspaperson a street with the headline Ebola Virus kills Liberian in Lagos, in Lagos Nigeria, Saturday, July 26, 2014. An Ebola outbreak that has left more than 600 people dead across West Africa has spread to the continent's most populous nation after a Liberian man with a high fever vomited aboard an airplane to Nigeria and then died there, officials said Friday. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba) The 40-year-old man had recently lost his sister to Ebola in Liberia, health officials there said. It was not immediately clear how he managed to board a flight, but he was moved into an isolation ward upon arrival in Nigeria on Tuesday and died on Friday. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
Men read newspapers on a street with headlines about Ebola Virus killing a Liberian in Lagos, Nigeria. Saturday, July 26, 2014. An Ebola outbreak that has left more than 660 people dead across West Africa has spread to the continent's most populous nation after a Liberian man with a high fever vomited aboard an airplane to Nigeria and then died there, officials said Friday. The 40-year-old man had recently lost his sister to Ebola in Liberia, health officials there said. It was not immediately clear how he managed to board a flight, but he was moved into an isolation ward upon arrival in Nigeria on Tuesday and died on Friday. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
In this Monday, July 15, 2014 photo, a woman, center, walks near the Arwa clinic, center rear, that was closed after the clinic doctor got infected by the Ebola virus in the capital city of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Ebola, a hemorrhagic fever that can cause its victims to bleed from the ears and nose, had never before been seen in this part of West Africa where medical clinics are few and far between. The disease has turned up in at least two other countries - Liberia and Sierra Leone - and more than 530 deaths have been attributed to the outbreak that is now the largest on record. (AP Photo/Youssouf Bah)
According to local reports the sale of water buckets has increased dramatically, because they are used by Liberian people to fill with disinfectant and to wash their hands to prevent the spread of the deadly Ebola virus, in the city of Monrovia, Liberia, Monday, Aug. 4, 2014. Dozens of local doctors and medical staff are among the dead, as foreign aid workers are arriving to help fight the Ebola outbreak and the Liberian government Information Minister Lewis Brown announced that all Ebola victims are to be cremated as fears rise that the disease could spread with bodies being buried in residential areas. (AP Photo / Jonathan Paye-Layleh)
Nigeria health officials wait to screen passengers at the arrival hall of Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos, Nigeria, Monday, Aug. 4, 2014. Nigerian authorities on Monday confirmed a second case of Ebola in Africa's most populous country, an alarming setback as officials across the region battle to stop the spread of a disease that has killed more than 700 people. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
Passengers queue for their passport document check by immigration officers at the arrivals hall of Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos, Nigeria, Monday, Aug. 4, 2014. Nigerian authorities on Monday confirmed a second case of Ebola in Africa's most populous country, an alarming setback as officials across the African region battle to stop the spread of the disease that has killed more than 700 people. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
In this July 15, 2014 photo, the Arwa clinic, center, that was closed after the clinic Doctor got infected by the Ebola virus in the capital city of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Ebola, a hemorrhagic fever that can cause its victims to bleed from the ears and nose, had never before been seen in this part of West Africa where medical clinics are few and far between. The disease has turned up in at least two other countries - Liberia and Sierra Leone - and more than 530 deaths have been attributed to the outbreak that is now the largest on record.(AP Photo/Youssouf Bah)
In this Monday, July 15, 2014 photo, a man washes his hands with disinfectant to prevent Ebola infection before he enters a hospital in the capital city of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Ebola, a hemorrhagic fever that can cause its victims to bleed from the ears and nose, had never before been seen in this part of West Africa where medical clinics are few and far between. The disease has turned up in at least two other countries - Liberia and Sierra Leone - and more than 530 deaths have been attributed to the outbreak that is now the largest on record. (AP Photo/ Youssouf Bah)
A woman prays with others from different religious groups against the spread of the Ebola virus, in Monrovia, Liberia, Saturday Aug. 2, 2014. An Ebola outbreak that has killed more than 700 people in West Africa is moving faster than efforts to control the disease, the head of the World Health Organization warned, as presidents from the affected countries met Friday in Guinea's capital. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
In this Monday, July 15, 2014 photo, a man washes his hands with disinfectant to prevent Ebola infection before entering a hospital in the capital city of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Ebola, a hemorrhagic fever that can cause its victims to bleed from the ears and nose, had never before been seen in this part of West Africa where medical clinics are few and far between. The disease has turned up in at least two other countries - Liberia and Sierra Leone - and more than 530 deaths have been attributed to the outbreak that is now the largest on record. (AP Photo/Youssouf Bah)
In this photo taken on July 8, 2014, a woman eat food that was prepared by a Ebola advocacy group Crusaders for Peace, as spokesperson Juli Endee, educates them on the deadly virus in Paynesville, east of the city Monrovia, Liberia. Ebola, a hemorrhagic fever that can cause its victims to bleed from the ears and nose, had never before been seen in this part of West Africa where medical clinics are few and far between. The disease has turned up in at least two other countries _ Liberia and Sierra Leone _ and 539 deaths have been attributed to the outbreak that is now the largest on record. (AP Photo/Jonathan Paye-Layleh)
A picture taken on July 24, 2014 shows staff of the Christian charity Samaritan's Purse putting on protective gear in the ELWA hospital in the Liberian capital Monrovia. An American doctor battling West Africa's Ebola epidemic has himself fallen sick with the disease in Liberia, Samaritan's Purse said on July 27. AFP PHOTO / ZOOM DOSSO (Photo credit should read ZOOM DOSSO/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on July 24, 2014 shows staff of the Christian charity Samaritan's Purse putting on protective gear in the ELWA hospital in the Liberian capital Monrovia. An American doctor battling West Africa's Ebola epidemic has himself fallen sick with the disease in Liberia, Samaritan's Purse said on July 27. AFP PHOTO / ZOOM DOSSO (Photo credit should read ZOOM DOSSO/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on July 24, 2014 shows protective gear including boots, gloves, masks and suits, drying after being used in a treatment room in the ELWA hospital in the Liberian capital Monrovia. An American doctor battling West Africa's Ebola epidemic has himself fallen sick with the disease in Liberia, Christian charity Samaritan's Purse said on July 27. AFP PHOTO / ZOOM DOSSO (Photo credit should read ZOOM DOSSO/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on June 28, 2014 shows members of Doctors Without Borders (MSF) putting on protective gear at the isolation ward of the Donka Hospital in Conakry, where people infected with the Ebola virus are being treated. The World Health Organization has warned that Ebola could spread beyond hard-hit Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone to neighbouring nations, but insisted that travel bans were not the answer. To date, there have been 635 cases of haemorrhagic fever in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, most confirmed as Ebola. A total of 399 people have died, 280 of them in Guinea. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
In this photo taken on Sunday, July 27, 2014, a boy, center, selling soft drinks walk past a clinic taking care of Ebola patients in the Kenema District on the outskirts of Kenema, Sierra Leone. Liberia President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has closed some border crossings and ordered strict quarantines of communities affected by the Ebola outbreak. The announcement late Sunday came a day after Sirleaf formed a new taskforce charged with containing the disease, which has killed 129 people in the country and more than 670 across the region.(AP Photo/ Youssouf Bah)
In this photo taken on Sunday, July 27, 2014, Medical personnel inside a clinic taking care of Ebola patients in the Kenema District on the outskirts of Kenema, Sierra Leone. Liberia President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has closed some border crossings and ordered strict quarantines of communities affected by the Ebola outbreak. The announcement late Sunday came a day after Sirleaf formed a new taskforce charged with containing the disease, which has killed 129 people in the country and more than 670 across the region.(AP Photo/ Youssouf Bah)
Health workers teach people about the Ebola virus and how to prevent infection, in Conakry, Guinea, Monday, March 31, 2014. Health authorities in Guinea are facing an "unprecedented epidemic" of Ebola, the international aid group Doctors Without Borders warned Monday as the death toll from the disease that causes severe bleeding reached 78. The outbreak of Ebola in Guinea poses challenges never seen in previous outbreaks that involved "more remote locations as opposed to urban areas," said Doctors Without Borders. (AP Photo/ Youssouf Bah)
FILE -In this file photo taken on Tuesday, June 17, 2014, people protest outside a hospital as Liberia President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf visit's the area after Ebola death's in Monrovia, Liberia. A senior official for Doctors Without Borders says the Ebola outbreak ravaging West Africa is “totally out of control” and that the medical group is stretched to the limit in its capacity to respond. Bart Janssens, the director of operations for the group in Brussels, said Friday, June 20, 2014, that international organizations and the governments involved need to send in more health experts and to increase the public education messages about how to stop the spread of the disease. (AP Photo/Jonathan Paye-Layleh,File)
Empty hospital beds are seen at Redemption hospital after nurses and patients fled the hospital due to Ebola deaths in Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday, June 17, 2014. Seven people believed to have the Ebola virus have died in recent days in the first deaths reported in the Liberian capital since the outbreak began, a health official said Tuesday. (AP Photo/Jonathan Paye-Layleh)
Employees of the sanitary control of Conakry airport check passengers before they leave the country on April 10, 2014. International aid organisations launched a series of emergency measures across west Africa on Thursday in a bid to contain one of the worst ever outbreaks of the deadly Ebola virus, which is threatening every country in the region. The tropical bug is thought to have killed more than 110 people in Guinea and Liberia since January, with suspected cases reported in Mali and Sierra Leone and aid workers warning that vital hygiene products could run out. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
Employees of the sanitary control of Conakry airport check passengers before they leave the country on April 10, 2014. International aid organisations launched a series of emergency measures across west Africa on Thursday in a bid to contain one of the worst ever outbreaks of the deadly Ebola virus, which is threatening every country in the region. The tropical bug is thought to have killed more than 110 people in Guinea and Liberia since January, with suspected cases reported in Mali and Sierra Leone and aid workers warning that vital hygiene products could run out. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
Employees of the sanitary control of Conakry airport check passengers before they leave the country on April 10, 2014. International aid organisations launched a series of emergency measures across west Africa on Thursday in a bid to contain one of the worst ever outbreaks of the deadly Ebola virus, which is threatening every country in the region. The tropical bug is thought to have killed more than 110 people in Guinea and Liberia since January, with suspected cases reported in Mali and Sierra Leone and aid workers warning that vital hygiene products could run out. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
Employees of the sanitary control of Conakry airport check passengers before they leave the country on April 10, 2014. International aid organisations launched a series of emergency measures across west Africa on Thursday in a bid to contain one of the worst ever outbreaks of the deadly Ebola virus, which is threatening every country in the region. The tropical bug is thought to have killed more than 110 people in Guinea and Liberia since January, with suspected cases reported in Mali and Sierra Leone and aid workers warning that vital hygiene products could run out. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
A member of the Guinean Red Cross uses a megaphone to give information concerning the Ebola virus during an awareness campaign on April 11, 2014 in Conakry. Guinea has been hit by the most severe strain of the virus, known as Zaire Ebola, which has had a fatality rate of up to 90 percent in past outbreaks, and for which there is no vaccine, cure or even specific treatment. The World Health Organization (WHO) has described west Africa's first outbreak among humans as one of the most challenging since the virus emerged in 1976 in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo. AFP PHOTO / CELLOU BINANI (Photo credit should read CELLOU BINANI/AFP/Getty Images)
Lagos State Health Commissioner Jide Idris, speaks, during a news conference in Lagos, Nigeria, Monday July 28, 2014. No one knows for sure just how many people Patrick Sawyer came into contact with the day he boarded a flight in Liberia, had a stopover in Ghana, changed planes in Togo, and then arrived in Nigeria, where authorities say he died days later from Ebola, one of the deadliest diseases known to man. Now health workers are scrambling to trace those who may have been exposed to Sawyer across West Africa, including flight attendants and fellow passengers. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
A man reads a newspaper featuring a front page story on the death of Liberian diplomat Patrick Sawyer (pictured with his wife Decontee) who died of the Ebloa virus in Lagos on July 30, 2014. Nigeria is on alert against the possible spread of Ebola after the first confirmed death from the virus in Lagos, Africa's biggest city and the country's financial capital. The victim, who worked for the Liberian government, collapsed at Lagos international airport after arriving on a flight from Monrovia via the Togolese capital Lome, according to the Nigerian government. Doctors Without Borders (MSF) warned that the crisis gripping Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone would only get worse and could not rule out it spreading to other countries. AFP PHOTO/PIUS UTOMI EKPEI (Photo credit should read PIUS UTOMI EKPEI/AFP/Getty Images)
A pharmacist searches for drugs in a pharmacy in Lagos on July 26, 2014. Nigeria was on alert against the possible spread of Ebola on July 26, a day after the first confirmed death from the virus in Lagos, Africa's biggest city and the country's financial capital. The health ministry said Friday that a 40-year-old Liberian man died at a private hospital in Lagos from the disease, which has now killed more than 650 people in four west African countries since January. AFP PHOTO / PIUS UTOMI EKPEI (Photo credit should read PIUS UTOMI EKPEI/AFP/Getty Images)
Decontee Sawyer, wife of Liberian government official Patrick Sawyer, a U.S. citizen who died from Ebola after traveling from Liberia to Nigeria, cradles her 1-year-old daughter Bella at her home in Coon Rapids, Minn., Tuesday, July 29, 2014. An outbreak of Ebola in West Africa may seem like a distant threat to many Americans, but it is stirring fear in Minnesota, home to thousands of Liberian immigrants. (AP Photo/Craig Lassig)
Bed frames are laid out to be used at a newly built MSF, 'Doctors Without Borders', Ebola treatment center in the city of Monrovia, Liberia, Monday, Aug. 18, 2014. Liberia's armed forces were given orders to shoot people trying to illegally cross the border from neighboring Sierra Leone, which was closed to stem the spread of Ebola, local newspaper Daily Observer reported Monday. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
A health worker washes with disinfectant after dealing with people suspected of having the Ebola virus in the city of Monrovia, Liberia, Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014. New figures released by the World Health Organization showed that Liberia has recorded more Ebola deaths — 413 — than any of the other affected countries. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
In this photo taken on Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014, a family sit near the body of their mother suspected of dying from the Ebola virus, as the father, right, tries to contact family members on his mobile phone, in Monrovia, Liberia. Liberian officials fear Ebola could soon spread through the capital's largest slum after residents raided a quarantine center for suspected patients and took items including blood-stained sheets and mattresses. The violence in the West Point slum occurred late Saturday and was led by residents angry that patients were brought from other parts of the capital to the holding center, Tolbert Nyenswah, assistant health minister, said Sunday. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
A man with the coffin of Dr Modupeh Cole, Sierra Leone's second senior physician to die of Ebola, at the MSF facility in Kailahun, on August 14, 2014. Kailahun along with Kenama district is at the epicentre of the world's worst Ebola outbreak. The World Health Organisation (WHO) revealed that the latest death toll from the Ebola virus in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria had claimed more than1000 lives. Health Organisations are looking into the possible use of experimental drugs to combat the latest outbreak in West Africa. AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
Sierra Leonese government burial team members wearing protective clothing stand next to the coffin of Dr Modupeh Cole, Sierra Leone's second senior physician to die of Ebola, at the Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) facility in Kailahun, on August 14, 2014. Kailahun along with Kenama district is at the epicentre of the world's worst Ebola outbreak. The World Health Organisation (WHO) revealed that the latest death toll from the Ebola virus in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria had claimed more than 1000 lives. Health Organisations are looking into the possible use of experimental drugs to combat the latest outbreak in West Africa. AFP PHOTO / CARL DE SOUZA (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
Dr Felicity Hartnell who is a clinical research fellow at Oxford University working on the experimental Ebola vaccine poses for photographers in Oxford England Wednesday Sept. 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Steve Parsons/Pool)
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By JONATHAN PAYE-LAYLEH

MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) - A Liberian health worker who recovered from Ebola after receiving an experimental drug urged the manufacturer to speed up its production and send it to Africa, while crowds celebrated in the streets Saturday after authorities reopened a slum that had been barricaded for more than a week to try to contain the disease.

Physician's assistant Kyndy Kobbah was expected to be released from hospital Saturday after she survived Ebola, which has been fatal in more than half the cases sweeping West Africa. Kobbah contracted the disease while working at a government-run hospital north of the capital.

In an interview with The Associated Press before her release, Kobbah urged the manufacturer of the experimental drug known as ZMapp to step up production. The company has said that all its supplies are exhausted and it will take months to make more.

"They need to make more Zmapp and send to us," she said.

Doctors have said there is no way to know whether ZMapp made a difference or if survivors like Kobbah recovered on their own, as about 45 percent of people infected in this outbreak have. The drug had never been tested in humans before it was given to two Americans who were infected with Ebola in Liberia. They survived Ebola and were released from an Atlanta hospital.

However, a study released online Friday by the journal Nature found that ZMapp healed all 18 monkeys infected with the deadly virus.

Meanwhile, tensions diminished Saturday in the West Point neighborhood of Liberia's capital after authorities lifted a blockade that had sparked unrest. Residents living in the area had feared running out of food and safe water on the peninsula.

Liberia's president had ordered the barricade on Aug. 19 after West Point residents stormed an Ebola health center several days earlier. Residents said they did not want sick people being brought into the community, although those staying at the center were only under observation during a 21-day incubation period.

Amid the melee, some protesters made off with blood-stained mattresses and other materials that could potentially spread the Ebola virus.

Lifting the quarantine Saturday morning doesn't mean there is no Ebola in the West Point slum, said Information Minister Lewis Brown. Authorities, though, are more confident now that they can work with residents to screen for the sick, he said.

"They're comfortable with the way the leadership and the community is working with the health team to make sure that the community remains safe," he said.

Liberia has been the hardest hit of the five countries with Ebola cases in West Africa, reporting at least 694 deaths among 1,378 cases. More than 3,000 cases have been reported across Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Nigeria, and on Friday Senegal announced its first case.

A student from Guinea who had been missing for several weeks showed up at a hospital in Dakar on Tuesday, seeking treatment but concealing that he had been in contact with other Ebola victims, Health Minister Awa Marie Coll Seck confirmed.

The next day, an epidemiological surveillance team in neighboring Guinea alerted Senegalese authorities that they had lost track of a person they were monitoring three weeks earlier, and that the person may have crossed into Senegal.

The student was tracked down in the Dakar hospital where he was confirmed with Ebola and immediately put into isolation where he is reported to be in satisfactory condition, Seck said. Authorities also sent out a team to disinfect the home where he was staying in Senegal.

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