Southern California pounded by more waves as storm eases

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2014 Hurricanes and Storms
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Southern California pounded by more waves as storm eases
Photo via NOAA
Photo via NOAA
Photo via NOAA
Photo via NOAA
Big waves crash ashore and into the pier at Seal Beach, California on August 27, 2014, where some overnight flooding occurred as the surging ocean water resulting from Hurricane Marie almost reached beachfront homes. And as surfers prep for what could be some of the biggest swells of the year, county and city officials are using tractors to fill in sand berms along coastal beaches, in a hopeful effort to avoid any flooding or other damage resulting from Hurricane Marie. AFP PHOTO / Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - AUGUST 27: A general view of atmosphere during th huge swells generated by hurricane Marie Reach along the southern California coastline on August 27, 2014 in Malibu, California. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
A bogieboarder rides a wave at the wedge in Newport Beach, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Southern California beachgoers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast of Mexico. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
Surf watchers are splashed at the pier in Malibu, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Southern California beachgoers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast of Mexico. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
LOS ANGELES, CA - AUGUST 27: A general view of atmosphere during th huge swells generated by hurricane Marie Reach along the southern California coastline on August 27, 2014 in Malibu, California. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
The attraction of seeing the big waves resulting from Hurricane Marie continues to draw people to southern California beaches, as people view the waves crashing onto shore and into the pier at Seal Beach, California on August 27, 2014, where some overnight flooding occurred as the surging ocean water almost reached beachfront homes. And as surfers prep for what could be some of the biggest swells of the year, county and city officials are using tractors to fill in sand berms along coastal beaches, in a hopeful effort to avoid any flooding or other damage resulting from Hurricane Marie. AFP PHOTO / Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
A bird stands ashore as big waves crash into the pier at Seal Beach, California on August 27, 2014, where some overnight flooding occurred as the surging ocean water resulting from Hurricane Marie almost reached beachfront homes. And as surfers prep for what could be some of the biggest swells of the year, county and city officials are using tractors to fill in sand berms along coastal beaches, in a hopeful effort to avoid any flooding or other damage resulting from Hurricane Marie. AFP PHOTO / Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - AUGUST 27: A general view of atmosphere during th huge swells generated by hurricane Marie Reach along the southern California coastline on August 27, 2014 in Malibu, California. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - AUGUST 27: A general view of atmosphere during th huge swells generated by hurricane Marie Reach along the southern California coastline on August 27, 2014 in Malibu, California. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
An unidentified surfer gets assistance from a Los Angeles County lifeguard on a watercraft, as heavy waves crash against the pier in Malibu, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Southern California beachgoers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast of Mexico. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
In this Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014 photo, a belly boarder takes on a big wave at the Wedge in Newport Beach, Calif. Southern California coastal communities have been inundated by a surge of rising seawater brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off Mexico's Pacific coast. (AP Photo/Kevin Warn)
A big wave from Hurricane Marie smashes against the Seal Beach pier in Seal Beach, Calif. on Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. The National Weather Service said beaches stretching 100 miles up the Southern California coast would see large waves and rip currents. Swimmers and surfers were urged to be aware of the dangerous conditions. (AP Photo/ Nick Ut )
A man is hit by waves on Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014, in Seal Beach, Calif. A low-lying street in the Southern California coastal community of Seal Beach has been inundated by a surge of rising seawater brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off Mexico's Pacific coast. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
A bogieboarder rides a wave at the wedge in Newport Beach, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Southern California beachgoers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast of Mexico. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
A surfer rides a wave at the wedge in Newport Beach, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Southern California beachgoers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast of Mexico. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
A bogieboarder rides a wave at the wedge in Newport Beach, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Southern California beachgoers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast of Mexico. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
A large crowd gathers to watch surfers and body surfer ride waves at the wedge on Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014 in Newport Beach, Calif. Beach goers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast of Mexico. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
A surfer flies off a wave at the wedge in Newport Beach, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Southern California beachgoers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast of Mexico. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
A bogieboarder rides a wave at the wedge in Newport Beach, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Southern California beachgoers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast of Mexico. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
Hector Brown sweeps out his aunt and uncle's house in Seal Beach, Calif. on Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. The entire house and garage was flooded by a foot of water and muddy sand late Tuesday night after low-lying streets in the Southern California coastal community was inundated by a surge of rising seawater brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off Mexico's Pacific coast. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
Beach front property is flooded after high tide and large waves caused heavy flooding in Seal Beach, Calif. on Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. A low-lying street in the Southern California coastal community of Seal Beach has been inundated by a surge of rising seawater brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off Mexico's Pacific coast. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
In this Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014 photo, a belly boarder takes on a big wave at the Wedge in Newport Beach, Calif. Southern California coastal communities have been inundated by a surge of rising seawater brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off Mexico's Pacific coast. (AP Photo/Kevin Warn)
In this Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014 photo, residents carry sandbags to protect homes after high a tide and large waves caused heavy flooding in Seal Beach, Calif. A low-lying street in the Southern California coastal community of Seal Beach has been inundated by a surge of rising seawater brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off Mexico's Pacific coast. (AP Photo/Kevin Warn)
A lifeguard tower knocked over by high tides sits on the beach as people stand on the sand wall on Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014, in Seal Beach, Calif. Parts of the low-lying Southern California coastal community of Seal Beach has been inundated by a surge of rising seawater brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off Mexico's Pacific coast. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Beachgoers watch large waves crash on the shore at Seal Beach, Calif., Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014. Residents in Southern California coastal areas filled sandbags and built sand berms Tuesday to ward against possible flooding from big and potentially damaging surf spawned by Hurricane Marie off Mexico's Pacific coast. A large southerly swell was expected to produce large waves, rip currents and strong longshore currents in Los Angeles and Ventura counties through Thursday, according to the National Weather Service. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
Community volunteer Edwin Schakeroh, left, helps Gavin Greely a resident fill sand bags in preparing for an expected storm surge in Long Beach, Calif., Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014. Southern California coastal areas are preparing for the arrival of big and potentially damaging surf spawned by Hurricane Marie spinning off Mexico's Pacific coast. (AP Photo/ Nick Ut )
Watching from a safe distance behind a barricade of traffic cones, beachgoers watch huge waves crash onto the shore at The Wedge in Newport Beach, Calif., Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014. Potentially damaging surf spawned by Hurricane Marie spinning off Mexico's Pacific coast is expected to produce large waves, rip currents and strong longshore currents in Los Angeles and Ventura counties through Thursday, according to the National Weather Service. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
In this Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014 photo, a woman drives through a flooded street after high tide and large waves caused heavy flooding in Seal Beach, Calif. A low-lying street in the Southern California coastal community of Seal Beach has been inundated by a surge of rising seawater brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off Mexico's Pacific coast. (AP Photo/Kevin Warn)
A man carries his board as he walks through the flooded beachfront properties, Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014, in Seal Beach, Calif. A low-lying street in the Southern California coastal community of Seal Beach has been inundated by a surge of rising seawater brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off Mexico's Pacific coast. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Onlookers gather along the beach to watch storm waves from Hurricane Marie in Seal Beach, Calif. in Seal Beach, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. The National Weather Service said beaches stretching 100 miles up the Southern California coast would see large waves and rip currents. Swimmers and surfers were urged to be aware of the dangerous conditions. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
A lifeguard watches surfers ride waves at the wedge on Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014 in Newport Beach, Calif. Beach goers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast on Mexico. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
This image provided by NASA shows Hurricane Marie taken fom the International Space Station Tuesday Aug. 26, 2014. The National Weather Service said beaches stretching 100 miles up the Southern California coast would see large waves and rip currents due to Marie. (AP Photo/NASA, Reid Wiseman)
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LOS ANGELES (AP) -- High surf generated by a former hurricane in the eastern Pacific rolled onto Southern California beaches again Thursday, showing signs of diminishing but still bringing warnings of possible property damage and dangerous rip currents.

Big breakers chewed away at beaches and provided thrills for surfers, body-boarders and shoreline crowds.

However, meteorologists said the conditions had peaked and would gradually subside through Friday, with high surf advisories expected to expire that evening.

Tropical Storm Marie, downgraded from hurricane status, was spinning more than 800 miles west of Punta Eugenia, Mexico, and was expected to be further downgraded to post-tropical cyclone status Thursday night, according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center.

The storm was moving toward the northwest at about 15 mph with maximum sustained winds dropping to 45 mph.

Surging surf arrived on the Southern California coast late Tuesday and was wildest on Wednesday. Blocks of oceanfront homes flooded in low-lying Seal Beach south of Los Angeles, pilings were knocked off the Malibu Pier and a boatyard on Santa Catalina Island was battered.

Warnings or advisories were posted for hundreds of miles of coastline. The National Weather Service called it the region's most significant southerly swell event since July of 1996.

Lifeguards worked to keep all but the most experienced surfers and swimmers out of the water but still made hundreds of rescues.

Beaches were left with deep gouges and abrupt drop-offs more typical of the aftermath of winter storms than summer.

At scenic Sycamore Cove below the rugged Santa Monica Mountains, waves on Thursday gradually stole remnants of an old lifeguard building known as the Cove House that collapsed into the angry surf overnight.

In Seal Beach, bulldozers were maintaining a high sand berm hastily created to protect shoreline homes and facilities, and the Port of Long Beach resumed operations at two cargo terminals where conditions a day earlier were too dangerous for the loading and unloading of four vessels.

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