How to Get a Credit Card Late Payment Fee Waived

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Using a credit card.
Getty ImagesSometimes, all you have to do to get a late fee waived is call the card issuer and ask.
By Matt Schulz

It was all my fault, and I felt awful about it. Worse yet, I was stuck with it, unless I got a break.

I'm talking about a $25 late payment penalty fee on a department store credit card that I opened within the last few months. As so many people have, I signed up for the card at the checkout counter, largely for the discount, and didn't really concern myself with the interest rate. But I would pay it all off in a big hurry, so I didn't have much to worry about -- or so I thought.

I used the card several times in a fairly short period to save a little bit extra on some clothes I needed to buy, and I quickly paid all but a small portion of my balance off quickly. But as weeks passed following those shopping trips, I basically forgot about the card. Out of sight, out of mind -- at least until that second bill arrived.

Angry at myself over my mistake, I didn't beat myself up. I took action.

Here's what I did:

1. I paid the bill ... The next day, I paid the bill through my bank's website. I knew it would take a few days to process and for the money to actually get to the credit card issuer, but that was OK. Since I acted quickly, I knew I wasn't in any danger of ending up 30 days past due, getting a black mark on my credit report and slashing my strong credit score. (If you are nearing that 30 days past-due threshold, don't rely on online banking. Call your bank and arrange something that ensures the bank gets paid more quickly.)

2. ... but not all of the bill. I pay my credit cards off each month, typically. I've been deep, deep in credit card debt and have no intent of ever returning to that point. However, in this case, paying the entire statement balance would have been a tactical error. Instead, I paid the balance minus $25 -- the amount of the late payment fee, which I hoped would eventually be waived by the credit card issuer.

3. I set up electronic billing and auto pay through my bank. I made this move for the card issuer's peace of mind -- or algorithm. My bank allows me to receive electronic bills through the bank's website and then pay them in full automatically each month. It seemed like a win-win for me and the bank. My thought was that if, when speaking with the issuer about waiving my late payment fee, I could tell the company that I've made these arrangements to ensure I'll never be late again, that might help my case. Of course, the issuer would have no way of knowing if I really had done it or if I was just saying I had, but even so, it felt like a worthwhile good-faith gesture to make.

4. I called and made my pitch. "Hi, my name's Matt Schulz. I was late with a payment recently. However, I just paid my bill online -- and even set up electronic billing and auto pay so it won't happen again -- and I'd like to see if you could waive my late payment fee." I was nervous about asking, since I don't have a terribly long track record with this card, but I asked anyway. The customer service representative said she needed to speak with her manager and proceeded to put me on hold. As I waited, I considered what I would do if my request was rejected, possibly going as far as threatening to close my card. But that became a moot point. A few nervous minutes later, she told me that the bank would grant my request, but only this once. Mission accomplished.

Of course, it probably helped that I have very strong credit overall, even if my history with this particular card is short. The better your track record with the credit card issuer, the more likely it is to cut you some slack when you mess up.

Still, the fact is that you don't have to have a perfect credit score to get a fee waived. Some credit cards -- like the Discover it card -- include a policy that allows a cardholder's first late-payment fee to be waived. But typically you do have to ask, and sometimes if you do, you might just find that you've saved yourself $25 for your efforts.

Matt Schulz is the senior industry analyst at CreditCards.com, a site dedicated to helping people make smart decisions about obtaining and using credit. You can follow him on Twitter at @matthewschulz.

How to Get a Credit Card Late Payment Fee Waived
Yes they can.

The CARD Act did get rid of the most outrageous abuse: they can no longer increase the interest rate on existing balances unless you go 60 days past due.

However, you need to remember that:
  • Most credit card interest rates are variable and are linked to the prime rate. Your high rate will only go higher when interest rates increase.
  • Based upon risk, your credit card company can still increase your interest rate on all future purchases. Your existing balances are protected, but future purchases would be at the higher rate. And determining risk is not limited to your behavior on your existing card. If you miss a payment with another lender, that could lead to an increase on all of your credit cards.
  • After 12 months, they can increase your rate for almost any reason. But the increased rate only applies to future purchases, and they need to give you 45 days notice.

Credit cards are incredibly expensive ways to borrow money. If you use a card, your goal should be to pay off the balance in full every month. Then, the interest rate doesn't matter.

Bottom line: If you do have debt, you should never be paying the purchase APR. Look for a balance transfer, or get a personal loan to cut your interest rate. And take a long hard look at your spending to put more money towards paying off that debt.
 

No, they are not.

There is a big difference between a 0% balance transfer (where the interest is waived during the promotional period, discussed above) and 0% purchase financing offered at many stores (where the interest is only deferred).

I regularly encourage people to use balance transfers to help them pay off their debt faster. With a balance transfer, interest is switched off or reduced during the promotional period. Once the promotional period is over, interest starts to accrue on a go-forward basis. This can take years off your debt repayment.

But stores offer 0 percent financing at the checkout. With a lot of these programs, interest is charged from the purchase date if you do not pay off the balance in full during the promotional period. So, if you have a 12-month 0 percent offer -– and do not pay off the balance in 12 months -– then in month 13 you will be charged a full 13 months of interest. They retroactively charge interest, and it will be like you never had a 0 percent offer at all.

 

This is a common practice. Online, Apple (AAPL) does this, via their partnership with Barclaycard (BCS).

And stores like Walmart (WMT) do the same thing.

Bottom line: I don't like deferred interest deals. Most people do not understand the difference between waived and deferred interest, and this practice feels deceptive. If you take one of these offers, make sure you pay off the balance in full before the promotion expires.
 

Not always.

Credit card companies have different rates for different types of transactions. The interest rate charged on a purchase (high) is different from a balance transfer APR (low).

Before the CARD Act, banks would apply your payment to the lowest APR balance first. Imagine you have a $1,000 balance. $500 is at 0 percent (balance transfer), and the other $500 is at 18 percent (purchase). If you make a $100 payment, banks would apply that to the balance transfer. That way, they reduce the balance transfer (at 0 percent) to $400, while protecting the $500 purchase balance (at 18 percent).

The CARD Act changed that. Banks now need to apply payments to the highest interest rate first. But this only applies to payments higher than the minimum due.

If you only pay the minimum due every month, your payment will still likely be applied to the lowest interest rate balance first.

Bottom line: You should never spend and have a balance transfer on the same credit card. Banks can only "trap" balances when you have multiple balance types on one card.
Not exactly true.

The CARD Act has stopped the handout of T-shirts on the steps of the school libraries, but they can still give sign-on bonuses. And they advertise on campus. For example, Citibank (C) has a "Thank You Preferred" card for college students. If you spend $500 in the first three months, you get 2,500 thank you points as a bonus. That is $25 of value.

Bottom line: I actually find this worse. Before, you got a free T-shirt just for signing up. Now, the credit card companies encourage spend on the card for the "free gift."

In the past, banks would charge you a fee if you went over your credit limit. Today, the CARD Act requires banks to receive your consent to charge an over-limit fee. So, in most cases, banks just eliminated those fees -- which is good news (kind of).

You can still go over your credit limit, if the bank approves your transaction. But the full amount by which you've exceeded your limit will be part of your minimum payment come the next bill, which could cause a payment shock.

More importantly, utilization (the percentage of your available credit that you use) is a big factor in your credit score. Your credit score determines the price you pay for credit. So, if you're over-limit on an account, you are considered riskier. That can result in the credit card company increasing your interest rate. And it could also result in other lenders increasing your rates with them. So you do pay, but it's an indirect cost.

Bottom line: We're glad the fee is gone, but you still need to be diligent and try to avoid going over your limit. If you pay your balance in full every month but are frequently bumping up against your credit limit, ask for a credit line increase.

Completely false.

I have heard from so many people that the way to eliminate overdraft fees is to opt out of overdraft protection. But it is impossible to completely opt out of overdraft.

Federal regulation requires consumers to opt into overdraft protection only for debit and ATM transactions.

But, the regulation does not cover checks and electronic transactions (including bill-pay and monthly direct debits, like gym memberships). The banks have all the power. If they approve the transaction, you would be charged an overdraft fee (typically $35 per transaction at banks and $25 at credit unions). If they decline the transaction, then you would be charged an NSF fee (non-sufficient funds), which is usually just as expensive as the overdraft fee.

Bottom line: You can't opt out of all overdraft fees. To avoid them, keep a buffer or find an account, like Ally, that doesn't charge those junk fees.
Not always true.

To be protected, you need to report the fraudulent transaction within 60 days. Otherwise, you give up a lot of your rights.

On ATM/debit cards, the bank can make you responsible for up to $500 of fraud if you report more than two days (but less than 60 days) after the transaction. On a credit card, you would never be liable for more than $50 (and most banks won't even hold you accountable for $50.)

One area where you will almost always lose is when your Personal Identification Number is used. If someone manages to get your PIN and takes money out of your account, then the bank will almost always assume that you authorized the transaction. Make sure you change your PIN often and never write it down.

Bottom line: Avoiding liability it your responsibility. Track your transactions regularly and call as soon as you detect any suspicious activity. And make sure you never share your PIN with anyone, or make it obvious.
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