Spirits roam during Hong Kong's ghost festival

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Spirits roam during Hong Kong's ghost festival
In this Aug. 20, 2014 photo, elderly audience watch the Chinese opera performance at a makeshift theater during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
In this Sunday, Aug. 17, 2014 photo, a woman holds a paper talisman written in Chinese words "Dispel ghost who died unjustly" before she burns during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
In this Sunday, Aug. 17, 2014 photo, a woman burns joss sticks near two paper bridges "The Golden Bridge and the Silver Bridge" which are believed to take the soul to the “Pure Land of the West” and Heaven during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
In this Aug. 16, 2014 photo, an elderly collects counterfeit ancient coins from an altar, which are representing gold coins to ward off evil spirit away during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
In this Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014 photo, a Chinese opera actress performs at a makeshift theater during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
In this Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014 photo, a woman burns incense at a makeshift altar during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
In this Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014 photo, a worshiper burns incense at a makeshift altar during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
In this Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014 photo, Chinese opera performance is held at a makeshift theater during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
In this Monday, Aug. 11, 2014 photo, a woman burns incense in front of a paper reproduction of the "Ghost King" at a makeshift altar during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
In this Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014 photo, a makeshift theater and altar are set up in front of some high rise buildings during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
In this Monday, Aug. 11, 2014 photo, taoists attend a service at a makeshift alter during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
In this Aug. 11, 2014 photo, a perigee moon, also known as a super moon is half covered by cloud during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
In this photo made early Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014, in Keelung, Taiwan, worshippers guide a burning model house draped with a message for a deceased family member out to the ocean as an offering to appease wandering ghosts during the Chinese folklore's mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In this photo made early Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014, in Keelung, Taiwan, worshippers guide a burning model house into the ocean as an offering to appease wandering ghosts during the Chinese folklore's mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In this photo made late Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, in Keelung, Taiwan, a traditional Chinese dance troupe performs during a parade marking the beginning of the Chinese folklore's mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In this photo made late Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, in Keelung, Taiwan, a traditional Chinese dance troupe performs during a parade marking the beginning of the Chinese folklore's mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In this photo made late Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, a musician drums classical beats during a parade marking the beginning of the Chinese folklore's mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival, in Keelung, Taiwan. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In this photo made late Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, a musician drums classical beats during a parade marking the beginning of the Chinese folklore's mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival, in Keelung, Taiwan. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In this Monday, Aug. 11, 2014 photo, Chinese gods are seen at the back stage of a makeshift theater during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
In this photo made early Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014, in Keelung, Taiwan, worshippers guide a model house draped with a message for a deceased family member out to the ocean as an offering to appease wandering ghosts during the Chinese folklore's mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In this photo made early Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014, in Keelung, Taiwan, a burning model house is seen floating out in the ocean as an offering to appease wandering ghosts during the Chinese folklore's mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In this photo made early Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014, in Keelung, Taiwan, a burning model house is seen floating out in the ocean as an offering to appease wandering ghosts during the Chinese folklore's mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In this photo made early Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014, in Keelung, Taiwan, an elaborate model house is seen being guided into the ocean as an offering to wandering ghosts during the beginning of the Chinese folklore's mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In this photo made late Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, in Keelung, Taiwan, an elaborate model house is brought to the ocean as an offering to wandering ghosts during the beginning of the Chinese folklore's mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In this photo made late Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, in Keelung, Taiwan, a traditional Chinese dragon dance during a parade marking the beginning of the Chinese folklore's mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In this photo made late Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, in Keelung, Taiwan, a traditional Chinese dance troupe performs during a parade marking the beginning of the Chinese folklore's mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In this photo made late Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, in Keelung, Taiwan, onlookers watch floats decorated with folklore characters during a parade marking the beginning of the Chinese mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
In this photo made late Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, children perform on inline skates during a parade marking the beginning of the Chinese folklore's mid-summer's Ghost Month Festival. Fourteen days into the seventh month of the lunar calendar, Aug. 9, in 2014, marks the traditional Chinese Ghost Month where the gates of the underworld are opened and spirits of the deceased are set free to roam the world of the living. The month long festivities are aimed to please the roaming spirits. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
Ethnic-Chinese Indonesians arrange offerings for their ancestors' souls during the "hungry ghost" festival in Medan, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014. During the month-long festival, Chinese people make offerings of food, "hell money" and paper-made models of items such as televisions, servants and cars to be burnt to appease the wandering spirits as it is believed that the gates of hell are opened during the month and their dead ancestors would return to visit their relatives. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara)
An ethnic-Chinese Indonesian man throws "hell money" prepared as offerings for his ancestors' souls into the air during the "hungry ghost" festival in Medan, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014. During the month-long festival, Chinese people make offerings of food, "Hell money" and paper-made models of items such as televisions, servants and cars to be burnt to appease the wandering spirits as it is believed that the gates of hell are opened during the month and their dead ancestors would return to visit their relatives. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara)
An ethnic-Chinese Indonesian man arranges offerings for their ancestors' souls during the "hungry ghost" festival in Medan, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014. During the month-long festival, Chinese people make offerings of food, "hell money" and paper-made models of items such as televisions, servants and cars to be burnt to appease the wandering spirits as it is believed that the gates of hell are opened during the month and their dead ancestors would return to visit their relatives. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara)
Ethnic-Chinese Indonesians carry an effigy of the "king of ghost" during the "hungry ghost" festival in Medan, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014. During the month-long festival, Chinese people make offerings of food, "hell money" and paper-made models of items such as televisions, servants and sport cars to be burnt to appease the wandering spirits as it is believed that the gates of hell are opened during the month and their dead ancestors would return to visit their relatives. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara)
In this Aug. 9, 2014 photo, a shadow of a women is cast near a stair as she burns paper money or locally known as "Hell Money," during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
In this Aug. 9, 2014 photo, the elderly burn paper money or locally known as "Hell Money," during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
In this Aug. 9, 2014 photo, a couple burn paper money or locally known as "Hell Money," during the "Hungry Ghost Festival" in Hong Kong. Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living ancestors, at least according to Chinese convention. In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
Ethnic Chinese people set fire to a paper-made statue of Chinese deity know as "Da Shi Ye," or "Guardian God of Ghosts," during the Ghost festival in Kajang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, late Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. The Ghost festival is celebrated during the seventh month of the Chinese lunar calendar, when prayers are offered to the dead and offerings of food and paper-made models of items such as televisions, refrigerators and sport cars are burnt to appease the wandering spirits. It is believed that the gates of hell are opened during the month and the dead ancestors return to visit their relatives. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)
An ethnic Chinese man burns joss sticks during the Ghost festival in Kajang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, late Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. The Ghost festival is celebrated during the seventh month of the Chinese lunar calendar, when prayers are offered to the dead and offerings of food and paper-made models of items such as televisions, refrigerators and sport cars are burnt to appease the wandering spirits. It is believed that the gates of hell are opened during the month and the dead ancestors return to visit their relatives. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)
Ethnic Chinese people throw joss papers to a paper-made statue of Chinese deity know as "Da Shi Ye," or "Guardian God of Ghosts," before they proceed the burning during the Ghost festival in Kajang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, late Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. The Ghost festival is celebrated during the seventh month of the Chinese lunar calendar, when prayers are offered to the dead and offerings of food and paper-made models of items such as televisions, refrigerators and sport cars are burnt to appease the wandering spirits. It is believed that the gates of hell are opened during the month and the dead ancestors return to visit their relatives. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)
An ethnic Chinese man burns joss papers during the Ghost festival in Kajang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, late Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. The Ghost festival is celebrated during the seventh month of the Chinese lunar calendar, when prayers are offered to the dead and offerings of food and paper-made models of items such as televisions, refrigerators and sport cars are burnt to appease the wandering spirits. It is believed that the gates of hell are opened during the month and the dead ancestors return to visit their relatives. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)
Ethnic Chinese offer a prayer in front of a paper-made statue of Chinese deity know as "Da Shi Ye," or "Guardian God of Ghosts," during the Ghost festival in Kajang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, late Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. The Ghost festival is celebrated during the seventh month of the Chinese lunar calendar, when prayers are offered to the dead and offerings of food and paper-made models of items such as televisions, refrigerators and sport cars are burnt to appease the wandering spirits. It is believed that the gates of hell are opened during the month and the dead ancestors return to visit their relatives. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)
Ethnic Chinese people move a paper-made statue of Chinese deity know as "Da Shi Ye," or "Guardian God of Ghosts," for burning during the Ghost festival in Kajang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, late Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. The Ghost festival is celebrated during the seventh month of the Chinese lunar calendar, when prayers are offered to the dead and offerings of food and paper-made models of items such as televisions, refrigerators and sport cars are burnt to appease the wandering spirits. It is believed that the gates of hell are opened during the month and the dead ancestors return to visit their relatives. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)
An ethnic Chinese man offers a prayer after a paper-made statue of Chinese deity know as "Da Shi Ye," or "Guardian God of Ghosts," burns during the Ghost festival in Kajang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, late Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. The Ghost festival is celebrated during the seventh month of the Chinese lunar calendar, when prayers are offered to the dead and offerings of food and paper-made models of items such as televisions, refrigerators and sport cars are burnt to appease the wandering spirits. It is believed that the gates of hell are opened during the month and the dead ancestors return to visit their relatives. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)
An ethnic Chinese man makes finishing touches to a paper made statue of Chinese deity know as "Da Shi Ye," or "Guardian God of Ghosts," before burning it during the Ghost festival in Kajang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, late Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. The Ghost festival is celebrated during the seventh month of the Chinese lunar calendar, when prayers are offered to the dead and offerings of food and paper-made models of items such as televisions, refrigerators and sport cars are burnt to appease the wandering spirits. It is believed that the gates of hell are opened during the month and the dead ancestors return to visit their relatives. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)
Members of a Chinese opera group offer prayers before a performance during the Ghost Festival in Klang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. According to Chinese tradition, the seventh month in the Chinese lunar calendar is called the Ghost Month in which ghosts and spirits are believed to come out from hell to visit earth. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)
A member of a Chinese opera group offers prayers before a performance during the Ghost Festival in Klang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. According to Chinese tradition, the seventh month in the Chinese lunar calendar is called the Ghost Month in which ghosts and spirits are believed to come out from hell to visit earth. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)
Members of a Chinese opera group offer prayers before a performance during the Ghost Festival in Klang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. According to Chinese tradition, the seventh month in the Chinese lunar calendar is called the Ghost Month in which ghosts and spirits are believed to come out from hell to visit earth. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)
Members of a Chinese opera group offer prayers before a performance during the Ghost festival in Klang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. According to Chinese tradition, the seventh month in the Chinese lunar calendar is called the Ghost Month in which ghosts and spirits are believed to come out from hell to visit earth. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)
Worshippers burn the “ghost money" to their families' ancestors at the grave in a cemetery during the Chinese Ching Ming, or Tomb Sweeping Day, in Hong Kong Saturday, April 5, 2014. Thousands of Hong Kong residents pay respects to their dead ancestors and relatives during the festival. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
An Ethnic Chinese priest stands in front of statue made of paper of Chinese deity 'Da Shi Ye' or Guardian God of Ghosts set of fire by devotees during the Hungry Ghost festival in Kuala Lumpur, late on August 10, 2014. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the Chinese new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, HongKong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO/ MANAN VATSYAYANA (Photo credit should read MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images)
A Chinese woman prays in front of a statue made of paper of Chinese deity 'Da Shi Ye' or Guardian God of Ghosts during the Hungry Ghost festival in Kuala Lumpur, late on August 10, 2014. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the Chinese new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, HongKong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO/ MANAN VATSYAYANA (Photo credit should read MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Chinese people pray as they watch a statue made of paper of Chinese deity 'Da Shi Ye' or Guardian God of Ghosts burned during the Hungry Ghost festival in Kuala Lumpur, late on August 10, 2014. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the Chinese new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, HongKong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO/ MANAN VATSYAYANA (Photo credit should read MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images)
An Ethnic Chinese priest stands in front of statue made of paper of Chinese deity 'Da Shi Ye' or Guardian God of Ghosts set of fire by devotees during the Hungry Ghost festival in Kuala Lumpur, late on August 10, 2014. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the Chinese new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, HongKong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO/ MANAN VATSYAYANA (Photo credit should read MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Ethnic Chinese devotees burn incense sticks and pray before setting a fire to a statue of Chinese deity 'Da Shi Ye' or Guardian God of Ghosts during the Hungry Ghost festival in Kuala Lumpur, late on August 10, 2014. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the Chinese new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, HongKong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO/ MANAN VATSYAYANA (Photo credit should read MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images)
An ethnic Chinese priest prays in a street during the Hungry Ghost festival in Kuala Lumpur, late on August 10, 2014. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the Chinese new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, HongKong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO/ MANAN VATSYAYANA (Photo credit should read MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images)
A Chinese devotee carries offerings in front of a statue made of paper of Chinese deity 'Da Shi Ye' or Guardian God of Ghosts during the Hungry Ghost festival in Kuala Lumpur, late on August 10, 2014. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the Chinese new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, HongKong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO/ MANAN VATSYAYANA (Photo credit should read MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images)
An ethnic Chinese priest prays in front of the statue made of paper of Chinese deity 'Da Shi Ye' or Guardian God of Ghosts during the Hungry Ghost festival in Kuala Lumpur, late on August 10, 2014. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the Chinese new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, HongKong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO/ MANAN VATSYAYANA (Photo credit should read MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman tends a small fire to mark Yu Lan or Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong on August 8, 2014. During Yu Lan, which runs throughout the seventh month of the lunar calendar, many people in Hong Kong tend small roadside fires, burn faux money and make other offerings that their ancestors can use in the afterlife, such as leaving out food, to appease transient 'hungry ghosts.' AFP PHOTO / Alex OGLE (Photo credit should read Alex Ogle/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman and child tend a small fire to mark Yu Lan or Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong on August 8, 2014. During Yu Lan, which runs throughout the seventh month of the lunar calendar, many people in Hong Kong tend small roadside fires, burn faux money and make other offerings that their ancestors can use in the afterlife, such as leaving out food, to appease transient 'hungry ghosts.' AFP PHOTO / Alex OGLE (Photo credit should read Alex Ogle/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman tends a small fire to mark Yu Lan or Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong on August 8, 2014. During Yu Lan, which runs throughout the seventh month of the lunar calendar, many people in Hong Kong tend small roadside fires, burn faux money and make other offerings that their ancestors can use in the afterlife, such as leaving out food, to appease transient 'hungry ghosts.' AFP PHOTO / Alex OGLE (Photo credit should read Alex Ogle/AFP/Getty Images)
A participant removes his headband whilst in front of a dragon dance company truck at the end of a parade for the Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong on August 22, 2013. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the lunar new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE LOPEZ According to traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is regarded as the ghost month in which spirits and ghosts come down to earth. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Performers dance during a parade for the Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong on August 22, 2013. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the lunar new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE LOPEZ According to traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is regarded as the ghost month in which spirits and ghosts come down to earth. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Performers hold flags during a parade for the Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong on August 22, 2013. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the lunar new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE LOPEZ According to traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is regarded as the ghost month in which spirits and ghosts come down to earth. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Performers dismantle a dragon at the end of a parade for the Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong on August 22, 2013. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the lunar new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE LOPEZ According to traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is regarded as the ghost month in which spirits and ghosts come down to earth. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A participant stands in a dragon dance company truck at the end of a parade for the Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong on August 22, 2013. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the lunar new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE LOPEZ According to traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is regarded as the ghost month in which spirits and ghosts come down to earth. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A participant holds a lantern during a parade for the Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong on August 22, 2013. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the lunar new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE LOPEZ According to traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is regarded as the ghost month in which spirits and ghosts come down to earth. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Performers wearing traditional costumes take part in a parade for the Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong on August 22, 2013. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the lunar new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE LOPEZ According to traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is regarded as the ghost month in which spirits and ghosts come down to earth. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Performers take part in a parade for the Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong on August 22, 2013. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the lunar new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE LOPEZ According to traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is regarded as the ghost month in which spirits and ghosts come down to earth. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A performer wearing a traditional costume (foreground) walks past a man standing by a truck during a parade for the Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong on August 22, 2013. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the lunar new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE LOPEZ According to traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is regarded as the ghost month in which spirits and ghosts come down to earth. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Performers take a break during a parade for the Hungry Ghost Festival in Hong Kong on August 22, 2013. The festival, celebrated in the seventh lunar month of the lunar new year calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan, marks the belief that the 'Gates of Hell' are opened to let out the hungry ghosts who then wander in the land of the living while foraging for food. During the festival, food offerings are made while paper money and joss sticks are burnt outside homes to keep the spirits of dead ancestors happy and to bring good luck. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE LOPEZ According to traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is regarded as the ghost month in which spirits and ghosts come down to earth. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Artists perform a Chinese opera gets during the Hungry Ghost festival in Malaysia's northern town of Bukit Mertajam on August 16, 2011. According to the traditional annual Chinese festival the spirits of the departed walk the earth at this time of year with practitioners leaving out food to placate the hungry souls. The festival is celebrated during the seventh lunar month of the Chinese calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan. AFP PHOTO / SAEED KHAN (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Artists perform a Chinese opera gets during the Hungry Ghost festival in Malaysia's northern town of Bukit Mertajam on August 16, 2011. According to the traditional annual Chinese festival the spirits of the departed walk the earth at this time of year with practitioners leaving out food to placate the hungry souls. The festival is celebrated during the seventh lunar month of the Chinese calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan. AFP PHOTO / SAEED KHAN (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Artists participating in the production of a Chinese opera get ready behind the stage during the Hungry Ghost festival in Malaysia's northern town of Bukit Mertajam on August 16, 2011. According to the traditional annual Chinese festival the spirits of the departed walk the earth at this time of year with practitioners leaving out food to placate the hungry souls. The festival is celebrated during the seventh lunar month of the Chinese calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan. AFP PHOTO / SAEED KHAN (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)
A visiting performer from mainland China applies makeup in preparation for a Chinese opera during a 'Hungry Ghost' festival in Malaysia's northern town of Bukit Mertajam on August 26, 2010. The festival is celebrated during the seventh lunar month of the Chinese calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan. AFP PHOTO / Saeed KHAN (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Visiting mainland Chinese performers take part in a Chinese opera during a 'Hungry Ghost' festival in Malaysia's northern town of Bukit Mertajam on August 26, 2010. The festival is celebrated during the seventh lunar month of the Chinese calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan. AFP PHOTO / Saeed KHAN (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)
A visiting performer from mainland China takes part in a Chinese opera during the 'Hungry Ghost' festival in Malaysia's northern town of Bukit Mertajam on August 26, 2010. The festival is celebrated during the seventh lunar month of the Chinese calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan. AFP PHOTO / Saeed KHAN (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Visiting performers from mainland China prepare to take part in a Chinese opera during a 'Hungry Ghost' festival in Malaysia's northern town of Bukit Mertajam on August 26, 2010. The festival is celebrated during the seventh lunar month of the Chinese calendar among communities in southern China, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan. AFP PHOTO / Saeed KHAN (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)
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HONG KONG (AP) -- Countless hungry and restless ghosts are roaming Hong Kong, and the world, to visit their living descendants, at least according to Chinese convention.

In traditional Chinese belief, the seventh month of the lunar year is reserved for the Hungry Ghost festival, or Yu Lan, a raucous celebration marked by feasts and music. This year the festival began Aug. 10. According to folklore, the ghosts who wander the physical world are ravenous and envious after dying without descendants or because they were not venerated by relatives who are still alive.

The hungry spirits need to be appeased, so ethnic Chinese around the world offer prayers to their deceased relatives along with sticks of joss, or incense. They also burn mock currency known as "hell money" and other paper copies of material wealth such as TV sets, mobile phones and even iPads and iPhones, which the ghosts use when they return to the underworld.

Neighborhoods hold nightly shows of shrill Chinese operas and pop concerts, with the front rows of seats always empty - reserved for the ghosts. The shows are accompanied by extravagant feasts of grilled pork, broiled chicken, rice and fruit. The offerings are made in the hope that the spirits will help them find good jobs, earn good grades or even with the lottery. The festival peaks on the 15th day of the lunar month - the most auspicious - when families offer cooked food to the ghosts.

Here's a gallery of images from this year's Hungry Ghost Festival by Hong Kong photographer Vincent Yu.

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