Farmer's Almanac Predicts 'Super-Cold' Winter, More Snow In Eastern U.S.

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Eastern U.S. Should Brace Itself For A 'Super-Cold' Winter

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) - The Old Farmer's Almanac, the familiar, 223-year-old chronicler of climate, folksy advice and fun facts, is predicting a colder winter and warmer summer for much of the nation.

Published Wednesday, the New Hampshire-based almanac predicts a "super-cold" winter in the eastern two-thirds of the country. The west will remain a little bit warmer than normal.
"Colder is just almost too familiar a term," Editor Janice Stillman said. "Think of it as a refriger-nation."

More bad news for those who can't stand snow: Most of the Northeast is expected to get more snowfall than normal, though it will be below normal in New England.

Before unpacking the parka, however, remember that "colder than average" is still only about 2 to 5 degrees difference.

Some other regional highlights:

- Florida's winter could be rainier than most years while other locales in the Southeast and central states will see less rain.

- Summer will be warmer than usual in most places while a drop in rainfall in the country's midsection could hurt crop yields.

- Despite some winter downpours in the west, the almanac says California's drought will likely continue.

- Hurricane season isn't expected to be especially active though a major storm could hit the Gulf Coast in late August.

For loyal readers of an almanac that also tracks to the minute every sunrise and sunset for the year, the timing of this year's publication may come as a surprise. Normally, it hits the stands in mid-September. In recent years, its younger cousin, the Maine-based Farmer's Almanac, has published in August and a competition of sorts has emerged, though Stillman said it had nothing to do with the earlier drop date.

"We've found that folks want the almanac as soon as the issue is done up, right as the growing season is done," she said. "It's also time to order oil, wood, salt for roads. We've had so many inquiries we just decided to get it into people's hands earlier."

The almanac, which has about an 80 percent success rate in its forecasts, employs modern technology but still uses the "secret formula" that founder Robert Thomas devised in 1792. By combining the study of sunspots, prevailing weather patterns and basic meteorology, the almanac's weather staff comes up with a long-range forecast. The temperature deviations are based on 30-year averages compiled by government forecasters.

The almanac also provides advice on planting, astronomy, food, love and trends.

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Farmer's Almanac Predicts 'Super-Cold' Winter, More Snow In Eastern U.S.
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 17: A machine removes snow in front of the Department of Agriculture, on March 17, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Washington area was hit with a over night snow storm leaving 5 to 7 inches of snow in some areas. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
  • From left, Brooks Crislip, 34, and his brother, Seth, 32, both of Charleston, jog along Kanawha Boulevard as snow steadily falls, Sunday, March 16, 2014, in Charleston, W.Va. Brooks said he and his brother are training for Grandma's Marathon, which takes place Saturday, June 21, in Duluth, Minn. (AP Photo/Charleston Daily Mail, Marcus Constantino)

NORTH BEACH, MD - MARCH 16: Snow in the lights along the Chesapeake Bay in North Beach, MD, on Sunday March 16, 2014. (Photo by Ray K. Saunders/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Daniel Davis is covered in snow and ice while clearing a sidewalk during a snow storm in Detroit Wednesday, March 12, 2014. The storm will likely move the Detroit area close to the seasonal snow total of 93.6 inches set in 1880-1881, according to the National Weather Service. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
John Carrington is bundled for the cold while walking in downtown Albany, N.Y., on Thursday, March 13, 2014. Bitter cold temperatures return after a winter storm dumped up to six inches of snow and ice on the Capital Region. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
A pedestrian walks along a slushy Western Ave. Wednesday, March 12, 2014, in Blue Island, Ill. A late winter storm dumped more than 5 inches of snow in the Chicago area, causing power outages and headaches for commuters. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
A snow covered side street shows the effects of an overnight snowstorm Wednesday, March 12, 2014, in Blue Island, Ill. A late winter storm dumped more than 5 inches of snow in the Chicago area, causing power outages and headaches for commuters. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Commuters walk through snow covered sidewalks after an overnight snowstorm Wednesday, March 12, 2014, in downtown Chicago. A late winter storm dumped more than 5 inches of snow in the Chicago area, causing power outages and headaches for commuters. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)
Commuters walk through snow covered sidewalks after an overnight snowstorm Wednesday, March 12, 2014, in downtown Chicago. A late winter storm dumped more than 5 inches of snow in the Chicago area, causing power outages and headaches for commuters. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)
A snow covered porch railing shows the effects of an overnight snowstorm Wednesday, March 12, 2014, in Blue Island, Ill. A late winter storm dumped more than 5 inches of snow in the Chicago area, causing power outages and headaches for commuters. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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