Thai army ruler nominated as next prime minister

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Thai army ruler nominated as next prime minister
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha prays during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha (C) salutes while reviewing a guard of honour as part of the military anniversary at 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha (C) salutes while reviewing a guard of honour as part of the military anniversary at 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha holds flowers during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha (C) salutes while reviewing a guard of honour as part of the military anniversary at 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha adjusts his cap during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha waves before leaving after attending 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai soldiers parade during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha walks during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai police major General Naiyawat Phadermchit speaks to the media outside Lat Phrao police station in Bangkok on August 19, 2014. Thai authorities said that they were testing the DNA of a Japanese man at the centre of a 'baby factory' scandal to determine if he is the biological father. AFP PHOTO / Nicolas ASFOURI (Photo credit should read NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images)
Thailand's new Prime Minister Prayuth Chan–ocha salutes upon arrival to attend an establishment anniversary of the 21st Infantry Regiment, Queen's Guard, in Chonburi Province, Thailand, Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Three months after overthrowing Thailand's last elected government, this Southeast Asian nation's junta leader is stepping out of his army uniform for good - to take up the post of prime minister in a move critics say will only extend his time at the helm and consolidate the military's grip on power. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai new Prime Minister Prayuth Chan–ocha waves on departure after attending an establishment anniversary of the 21st Infantry Regiment, Queen's Guard in Chonburi Province ,Thailand .Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Three months after overthrowing Thailand's last elected government, this Southeast Asian nation's junta leader is stepping out of his army uniform for good - to take up the post of prime minister in a move critics say will only extend his time at the helm and consolidate the military's grip on power. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai new Prime Minister Prayuth Chan–ocha arrives to attend an establishment anniversary of the 21st Infantry Regiment, Queen's Guard in Chonburi Province ,Thailand .Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Three months after overthrowing Thailand's last elected government, this Southeast Asian nation's junta leader is stepping out of his army uniform for good - to take up the post of prime minister in a move critics say will only extend his time at the helm and consolidate the military's grip on power. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai new Prime Minister Prayuth Chan–ocha salutes upon arrival to attend an establishment anniversary of the 21st Infantry Regiment, Queen's Guard in Chonburi Province, Thailand .Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Three months after overthrowing Thailand's last elected government, this Southeast Asian nation's junta leader is stepping out of his army uniform for good - to take up the post of prime minister in a move critics say will only extend his time at the helm and consolidate the military's grip on power. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thailand's new Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, right, arrives for an establishment anniversary of the 21st infantry regiment, Queen's Guard in Chonburi Province, Thailand, Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Three months after overthrowing Thailand's last elected government, this Southeast Asian nation's junta leader is stepping out of his army uniform for good - to take up the post of prime minister in a move critics say will only extend his time at the helm and consolidate the military's grip on power. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thailand's Army commander Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha, left, arrives at the Royal Thai Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand, Friday, June 13, 2014. The head of Thailand's military junta said Friday that an interim government would be set up by September, offering the most specific timeline yet on a possible transfer of power after last month's coup. (AP Photo/ASTV Manager newspaper) THAILAND OUT
Thai police officers get order as they are deployed for security in Bangkok's Victory Monument, Thailand, Sunday, June 8, 2014. Thai police warned online critics of the military junta Friday that they will "come get you" for posting political views that could incite divisiveness, the latest reminder about surveillance of social media in post-coup Thailand. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: Protesters confront soldiers in riot gear blocking the route of an anti-coup march on May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The Thai capital has seen several anti-coup rallies since the military seized control on May 22. Thailand's ruling military has declared martial law that bans public assembly and imposes a night-time curfew. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: Thai army soldiers are briefed by an officer before deploying to an anti-coup rally on May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The Thai capital has seen several anti-coup rallies since the military seized control on May 22. Thailand's ruling military has declared martial law that bans public assembly and imposes a night-time curfew. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: People gather to make anti-coup protest in Bangkok, Thailand on 24 May, 2014. Soldiers do not intervene protestors although anti-coup protest is forbidden in Thailand. (Photo by Vinai Dithajohn/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: Thai military wear riot shields as tensions increase during an anti-coup protest on the second day of Thailand's military coup May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's coup leaders they will continue to detain former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, along with Cabinet members and other anti-government protest leaders for up to a week. Thailand has seen many months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. Thailand is now experiencing it's twelfth coup with seven attempted previous coups. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: Protesters holds signs during an anti-coup protest on the second day of Thailand's military coup May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's coup leaders they will continue to detain former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, along with Cabinet members and other anti-government protest leaders for up to a week. Thailand has seen many months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. Thailand is now experiencing it's twelfth coup with seven attempted previous coups. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24; Thai protesters fight with police and military trying to arrest them during an anti-coup protest on the second day of Thailand's military coup May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's coup leaders they will continue to detain former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, along with Cabinet members and other anti-government protest leaders for up to a week. Thailand has seen many months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. Thailand is now experiencing it's twelfth coup with seven attempted previous coups. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
An anti-coup protester is taken away from the site of a gathering by Thai soldiers in Bangkok on May 24, 2014. Thailand's military will detain former premier Yingluck Shinawatra and ousted government leaders for up to one week, the army said on May 24, tightening its grip over the country following a coup that has provoked an international outcry. AFP PHOTO / Christophe ARCHAMBAULT (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)
A protester is detained by Thai soldiers during an anti-coup demonstration at the Victory Monument in Bangkok, Thailand, Saturday, May 24, 2014. Thailand's coup leaders said Saturday that they would keep former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, Cabinet members and anti-government protest leaders detained for up to a week to give them "time to think" and to keep the country calm. They also summoned outspoken academics to report to the junta. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers are pushed by protesters as they move in to disperse a protest against the coup outside a shopping complex in Bangkok, Thailand Saturday, May 24, 2014. Thailand's coup leaders said Saturday they will keep former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, Cabinet members and anti-government protest leaders detained for up to a week to give them "time to think" and to keep the country calm. They also summoned outspoken academics to report to the junta. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
This photo taken off the TV screen shows the blue screen with military crests that replaced all TV programming in Thailand Friday, May 23, 2014. Thailand’s junta has commandeered every TV channel for round-the-clock broadcasts of dour announcements and patriotic hymns. The public’s verdict: DJ, please change the soundtrack. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai soldiers stand insid Thai TV 3 in Bangkok, Thailand Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law in a surprise announcement before dawn Tuesday that it said was aimed at keeping the country stable after six months of sometimes violent political unrest. The military, however, denied a coup d'etat was underway. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Armed Thai soldiers patrol on a motorbike near the Democracy Monument in Bangkok, Thailand Friday, May 23, 2014. Thailand's ruling military on Friday summoned the entire ousted government and members of the politically influential family at the heart of the country's long-running conflict, a day after it seized control of this volatile Southeast Asian nation in a non-violent coup. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 22: A woman uses a phone to capture Thai army soldiers securing the grounds of the venue for peace talks between pro- and anti-government groups on May 22, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army chief announced in an address to the nation that the armed forces were seizing power amid reports that leaders of the opposing groups attending the talks were being detained by the military. Thailand has seen months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 22: Press pose for a portrait with Thai army soldiers standing guard at the grounds of the venue for peace talks between pro- and anti-government groups on May 22, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army chief announced in an address to the nation that the armed forces were seizing power amid reports that leaders of the opposing groups attending the talks were being detained by the military. Thailand has seen months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
Thai soldiers patrol on foot on a road near the rally site for pro-government demonstrators on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Thursday, May 22, 2014. The opponents in Thailand's polarizing political crisis prepared Thursday for a second round of talks mediated by the country's army chief, who says he invoked martial law and then summoned the bitter rivals to try to end six months of turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers stand guard after army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha met with anti-government and pro-government leaders at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief announced in an address to the nation on Thursday that the armed forces were seizing power after months of deadly political turmoil. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
A tourist walks past Thai soldiers guard on a street in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
A Thai soldier stands guard on a street in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai soldiers chat inside a tent on an overpass while providing security near a rally site for pro-government demonstrators on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Thursday, May 22, 2014. The opponents in Thailand's polarizing political crisis prepared Thursday for a second round of talks mediated by the country's army chief, who says he invoked martial law and then summoned the bitter rivals to try to end six months of turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers carry packs of drinking water while providing security near a rally site for pro-government demonstrators on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Thursday, May 22, 2014. The opponents in Thailand's polarizing political crisis prepared Thursday for a second round of talks mediated by the country's army chief, who says he invoked martial law and then summoned the bitter rivals to try to end six months of turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A motorcyclist and his passenger ride past Thai soldiers standing guard at the gate to the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Thursday, May 22, 2014. The opponents in Thailand's polarizing political crisis met Thursday for a second round of talks mediated by the country's army chief, who says he invoked martial law and then summoned the bitter rivals to try to end six months of turmoil. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Two Thai soldiers, left, follow two military police officers while guarding the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Thursday, May 22, 2014. The opponents in Thailand's polarizing political crisis met Thursday for a second round of talks mediated by the country's army chief, who says he invoked martial law and then summoned the bitter rivals to try to end six months of turmoil. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai soldiers gather while waiting for an order at the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Thursday, May 22, 2014. The opponents in Thailand's polarizing political crisis met Thursday for a second round of talks mediated by the country's army chief, who says he invoked martial law and then summoned the bitter rivals to try to end six months of turmoil. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
An armed Thai soldier is reflected in a puddle as he guards a road near a pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A Thai soldier checks barbed wire while guarding a road near pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
An armed Thai soldier, right, helps an aged woman down the stairs of a pedestrian bridge near the pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand began its second day under martial law Wednesday with little visible military presence on the streets of Bangkok as residents tried to make sense of the dramatic turn of events after six months of anti-government protests and political turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
FILE - In this Tuesday, May 20, 2014 file photo, Thai soldiers stand guard outside Government House compound of prime minister's office in Bangkok as Thailand's army declared martial law before dawn Tuesday in a surprise announcement it said was aimed at keeping the country stable after six months of turbulent political unrest. Thailand’s army has always played a major role in politics, seizing power at least 11 times in the last century. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit, File)
A Buddhist monk walks past a Thai soldier who provides security near the pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand began its second day under martial law Wednesday with little visible military presence on the streets of Bangkok as residents tried to make sense of the dramatic turn of events after six months of anti-government protests and political turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers unload equipments from a truck while providing security near the pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand began its second day under martial law Wednesday with little visible military presence on the streets of Bangkok as residents tried to make sense of the dramatic turn of events after six months of anti-government protests and political turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A Thai soldier looks at a motorcyclist riding past while providing security near the pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand began its second day under martial law Wednesday with little visible military presence on the streets of Bangkok as residents tried to make sense of the dramatic turn of events after six months of anti-government protests and political turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers set up tent on a pedestrian bridge near the pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand began its second day under martial law Wednesday with little visible military presence on the streets of Bangkok as residents tried to make sense of the dramatic turn of events after six months of anti-government protests and political turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A Thai soldier guards on a street in Bangkok, Thailand, Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's powerful military chief intervened Tuesday for the first time in the country's latest political crisis, declaring martial law and dispatching gun-mounted jeeps into the heart of the capital with a vow to resolve the deepening conflict as quickly as possible. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
A Thai mother and daughter have their photograph taken with a soldier guarding the area near a pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A Thai soldier takes a break while guarding an area near a pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A man, center, hands a cold drink to Thai soldiers guarding an area near a pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers push a school van while guarding an area near a pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers circle to get orders from their superior, left, while guarding an area near a pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers push a school car while guarding an area near a pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A Thai reporter browses his mobile phone while sitting next to a line of Thai soldiers standing guarding inside the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Armed with shields, Thai soldiers march in line to provide security outside a meeting hall at the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai soldiers march while providing security inside the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Armed with shields that read "Army" Thai soldiers march in line to provide security outside a meeting hall of the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
A Thai reporter poses for a photograph with a group of Thai soldiers standing guard at the compound of the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai Army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha (C) speaks next to Navy chief Narong Pipatanasai (L) and Air Chief Marshal Prajin Jantong (R) during a press conference at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in central Bangkok and censoring the media but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers stand guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
Thai army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha gives a traditional greeting to delegates prior to a meeting at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in central Bangkok and censoring the media but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha gives a traditional greeting to delegates during a meeting at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in central Bangkok and censoring the media but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers stand guard outside the National Broadcasting Services of Thailand after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: A Thai army soldier stands guard outside the National Broadcasting Services of Thailand after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers patrol the offices of the National Broadcasting Services of Thailand after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Passersby photo Thai army soldiers standing guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: View of a gun mounted on a Thai army vehicle as soldiers stand guard on a busy city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers stand guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Passersby pose for a photo with Thai army soldiers standing guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: A foreign tourist poses for a photo as Thai army soldiers stand guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers stand guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: A Thai army officer briefs soldiers standing guard outside the National Broadcasting Services of Thailand after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
Royal Thai Army soldiers keep watch from a military vehicle while stationed outside the Royal Thai Police headquarters as traffic drives past in central Bangkok, Thailand, on Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Thailand's army imposed martial law nationwide after months of political turmoil that brought down an elected leader and tipped the economy into a contraction. Photographer: Dario Pignatelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Thai army soldiers take a break from checkpoint near where pro-government ''Red shirts'' have been rallying for days on the outskirts of Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law across the deeply divided kingdom on May 20 to restore order after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in the capital but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO/ Nicolas ASFOURI (Photo credit should read NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai army soldiers take a break at a checkpoint near where pro-government ''Red shirts'' have been rallying for days on the outskirts of Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law across the deeply divided kingdom on May 20 to restore order after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in the capital but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO/ Nicolas ASFOURI (Photo credit should read NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai soldiers walk after being deployed to guard in Bangkok's Victory Monument, Thailand, Sunday, June 8, 2014. Thai police warned online critics of the military junta Friday that they will "come get you" for posting political views that could incite divisiveness, the latest reminder about surveillance of social media in post-coup Thailand. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
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By TODD PITMAN
Associated Press

BANGKOK (AP) -- Three months after overthrowing Thailand's last elected government, this Southeast Asian nation's junta leader is stepping out of his army uniform for good - to take up the post of prime minister in a move critics say will only extend his time at the helm and consolidate the military's grip on power.

Thailand's junta-appointed legislature voted unanimously Thursday to name Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha to the new job during a session in Bangkok.

There was little doubt over the outcome since Prayuth was the only candidate.

The 60-year-old leader is due to retire from the army next month but until then he can hold both positions. Thursday's appointment appears aimed in part at keeping him at the helm as the military implements sweeping political reforms that critics say are designed to purge the influence of the ousted ruling party and favor an elite minority that has failed to win national elections for more than a decade.

Thailand Democracy a Long Way Away

Prayuth has effectively served as de facto premier since staging the May 22 coup. For several years before that, he held the position of army chief - a post that many regard as one of the most powerful and influential in a country where the military has seized power 12 times since the end of absolute monarchy in 1932.

"He could have refused the job, but what would be the point?" said Pavin Chachavalpongpun, a Thai professor of Southeast Asian studies at Japan's Kyoto University whose passport was revoked after criticizing the coup and refusing to respond to a junta summons ordering home.

Prayuth's appointment by the National Legislative Assembly must be approved by King Bhumibol Adulyadej, a formality likely to occur within a week. Prayuth will then name a 35-member Cabinet.

The vote was the latest in a series of moves by the junta to consolidate power on its own terms.

In July, the military adopted a temporary 48-article constitution. Shortly afterward, the junta appointed the assembly that is dominated by active and retired duty officers.

Earlier this week, Prayuth appeared at Parliament to present next fiscal year's budget; he was dressed for the first time in public in a business suit, an apparent signal he was readying for the new job.

Prayuth has justified the coup by saying the army had to intervene to end half a year of protests that had paralyzed the government and triggered sporadic violence that left 28 people dead and hundreds injured. While stability has been restored and life has largely returned to normal, the junta has been criticized for cracking down harshly on even the slightest dissent.

Most politicians from the ousted ruling party, including former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, were briefly detained by the army - and released only after signing agreements effectively preventing them from speaking out. Violators, the junta has warned, will face prosecution.

Critics, though, say reconciliation - and any legitimate debate on the divided nation's fate - cannot take place in a climate of fear.

The May putsch was swiftly condemned by Western powers, but Thailand's relations with key Asian nations remain unchanged. Concerns over human rights abuses and the restoration of democracy were not even mentioned publicly earlier this month during a regional foreign ministers summit earlier hosted by Myanmar.

Thailand has been deeply divided since 2006, when former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra - Yingluck's brother - was toppled after being accused of corruption, abuse of power and disrespect for Bhumibol.

Thaksin, a former telecommunications billionaire whose political allies have won every national election since 2001, lives in self-imposed exile in Dubai but remains an intensely polarizing figure. He is highly popular among the poor in Thailand's north and northeast, but despised by a Bangkok-based elite backed by the army and staunch royalists who view him as a corrupt demagogue who bought votes with populist promises.

Although Prayuth has promised to eventually restore democracy and hold elections as early as 2015, Pavin, the analyst, said the junta was working to remove all traces of Thaksin's influence before then.

Ultimately, "the elite want to gain control over politics. In the last decade, their domination was taken away by Thaksin through elections," Pavin said. "They are trying to weaken that now ... and ensure that politicians linked to Thaksin can't come back."

Thailand has not had a prime minister since caretaker premier Niwattumrong Boonsongpaisan's government was ousted in the May coup. Niwattumrong held the position only briefly to replace Yingluck, who took office after a landslide 2011 election but was forced to resign for nepotism in a court case her supporters say was politically motivated.

Prayuth's governance style differed markedly from his predecessor. The gruff leader has veered beyond usual government policy talk and his speeches have sometimes taken on a paternalistic tone.

Taking to the airwaves almost every Friday night to explain the junta's objectives, Prayuth has urged people to recycle their trash, to avoid credit card debt, and even to avoid shopping if they feel stressed. He has also launched a "national happiness" campaign and spelled out the "12 core values of the Thai people," key among them, showing respect for the nation's king.

Slideshow with more on Thailand:

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Thai army ruler nominated as next prime minister
Nachacha Kongudom, 21, raises a three-finger salute outside a cinema where “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1” is showing, in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014. Police detained three students Thursday at the opening of the latest "Hunger Games" movie in Thailand, where opponents of May’s military coup have adopted the film’s three-finger salute as a sign of defiance. The military-imposed government has banned the gesture, which symbolizes rebellion against totalitarian rule in the film series. One cinema chain in the country's capital canceled all screenings of the movie ahead of its Thursday opening after a student group planned an anti-coup protest outside one of its theaters. Activists say police pressured the chain to halt the showings. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai policemen stand guard outside a cinema hall ahead of a planned anti-coup protest in Bangkok on November 20, 2014. Thai police said they have detained three university students from outside Bangkok cinemas on November 20 as at least two theatres cancelled opening screenings of 'The Hunger Games' in the junta-ruled nation. AFP PHOTO/Christophe ARCHAMBAULT (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)
A Thai student flashes a three-finger salute, an unofficial symbol of resistance against the army's May coup, at a cinema hall in Bangkok on November 20, 2014. Thai police said they have detained three university students from outside Bangkok cinemas on November 20 as at least two theatres cancelled opening screenings of 'The Hunger Games' in the junta-ruled nation. AFP PHOTO/Christophe ARCHAMBAULT (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)
A Thai student (C) holds her arms up as she is escorted out of a cinema hall by plainclothes police officers in Bangkok on November 20, 2014. Thai police said they have detained three university students from outside Bangkok cinemas on November 20 as at least two theatres cancelled opening screenings of 'The Hunger Games' in the junta-ruled nation. AFP PHOTO/Christophe ARCHAMBAULT (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)
A Thai student (C) is escorted out of a cinema hall by plainclothes police officers after she flashed a three-finger salute, an unofficial symbol of resistance against the army's May coup, in Bangkok on November 20, 2014. Thai police said they have detained three university students from outside Bangkok cinemas on November 20 as at least two theatres cancelled opening screenings of 'The Hunger Games' in the junta-ruled nation. AFP PHOTO/Christophe ARCHAMBAULT (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)
A Thai student flashes a three-finger salute, an unofficial symbol of resistance against the army's May coup, as she stands by a poster of the latest Hunger Games film, at a cinema hall in Bangkok on November 20, 2014. Thai police said they have detained three university students from outside Bangkok cinemas on November 20 as at least two theatres cancelled opening screenings of 'The Hunger Games' in the junta-ruled nation. AFP PHOTO/Christophe ARCHAMBAULT (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)
A Thai student (C) flashes a three-finger salute, an unofficial symbol of resistance against the army's May coup, as she is escorted out of a cinema hall by plainclothes female police officers in Bangkok on November 20, 2014. Thai police said they have detained three university students from outside Bangkok cinemas on November 20 as at least two theatres cancelled opening screenings of 'The Hunger Games' in the junta-ruled nation. AFP PHOTO/Christophe ARCHAMBAULT (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)
In this Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 photo, Thai student activists raise the three-fingered salute in front of Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha as he speaks in Khon Kaen province, northeast of Bangkok, Thailand. Five university students were arrested after giving the salute during the speech by Prayuth who led the coup as army commander. The military-imposed government banned the gesture, which symbolizes rebellion against totalitarian rule in the "Hunger Games" movie series. One cinema chain in Thailand's capital canceled all screenings of the movie ahead of its Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014 opening after a student group planned an anti-coup protest outside one of its theaters. (AP Photo/Bangkok Post) THAILAND OUT
Activists show tickets of “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1” to distribute free to passers-by in front of the movie's billboard, in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014. Police detained three students Thursday at the opening of the latest "Hunger Games" movie in Thailand, where opponents of May’s military coup have adopted the film’s three-finger salute as a sign of defiance. The military-imposed government has banned the gesture, which symbolizes rebellion against totalitarian rule in the film series. One cinema chain in the country's capital canceled all screenings of the movie ahead of its Thursday opening after a student group planned an anti-coup protest outside one of its theaters. Activists say police pressured the chain to halt the showings. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Nachacha Kongudom, 21, raises a three-finger salute outside a cinema where “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1” is showing, in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014. Police detained three students Thursday at the opening of the latest "Hunger Games" movie in Thailand, where opponents of May’s military coup have adopted the film’s three-finger salute as a sign of defiance. The military-imposed government has banned the gesture, which symbolizes rebellion against totalitarian rule in the film series. One cinema chain in the country's capital canceled all screenings of the movie ahead of its Thursday opening after a student group planned an anti-coup protest outside one of its theaters. Activists say police pressured the chain to halt the showings. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Nachacha Kongudom, 21, raises a three-fingered salute outside a cinema where “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1” is showing, in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014. Police detained three students Thursday at the opening of the latest "Hunger Games" movie in Thailand, where opponents of May’s military coup have adopted the film’s three-finger salute as a sign of defiance. The military-imposed government has banned the gesture, which symbolizes rebellion against totalitarian rule in the film series. One cinema chain in the country's capital canceled all screenings of the movie ahead of its Thursday opening after a student group planned an anti-coup protest outside one of its theaters. Activists say police pressured the chain to halt the showings. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Nachacha Kongudom raises a three-finger salute as she is detained by plainclothes policewomen outside a cinema where “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1” is showing, in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014. Police detained three students Thursday at the opening of the latest "Hunger Games" movie in Thailand, where opponents of May’s military coup have adopted the film’s three-finger salute as a sign of defiance. The military-imposed government has banned the gesture, which symbolizes rebellion against totalitarian rule in the film series. One cinema chain in the country's capital canceled all screenings of the movie ahead of its Thursday opening after a student group planned an anti-coup protest outside one of its theaters. Activists say police pressured the chain to halt the showings. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Nachacha Kongudom, 21, raises a three-finger salute outside a cinema where “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1” is showing, in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014. Police detained three students Thursday at the opening of the latest "Hunger Games" movie in Thailand, where opponents of May’s military coup have adopted the film’s three-finger salute as a sign of defiance. The military-imposed government has banned the gesture, which symbolizes rebellion against totalitarian rule in the film series. One cinema chain in the country's capital canceled all screenings of the movie ahead of its Thursday opening after a student group planned an anti-coup protest outside one of its theaters. Activists say police pressured the chain to halt the showings. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
A protester flashes three fingers, representing liberty, brotherhood and equality, during an anti-coup demonstration at a shopping mall in Bangkok, Thailand Sunday, June 1, 2014. Hundreds of demonstrators shouting "Freedom!" and "Democracy!" gathered Sunday near a major shopping mall in downtown Bangkok to denounce the country's May 22 coup despite a lockdown by soldiers of some of the city's major intersections. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Protesters raise three fingers, representing liberty, brotherhood and equality, during an anti-coup demonstration in Bangkok, Thailand Sunday, June 1, 2014. Hundreds of demonstrators shouting "Freedom!" and "Democracy!" gathered Sunday near a major shopping mall in downtown Bangkok to denounce the country's May 22 coup despite a lockdown by soldiers of some of the city's major intersections. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Protesters flash three fingers, representing liberty, brotherhood and equality, and shouts during an anti-coup demonstration at an overpass in Bangkok, Thailand Sunday, June 1, 2014. Hundreds of demonstrators shouting "Freedom!" and "Democracy!" gathered Sunday near a major shopping mall in downtown Bangkok to denounce the country's May 22 coup despite a lockdown by soldiers of some of the city's major intersections. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Protesters show three fingers represent liberty, brotherhood and equality during an anti-coup demonstration in Bangkok, Thailand Sunday, June 1, 2014. Hundreds of demonstrators shouting "Freedom!" and "Democracy!" gathered Sunday near a major shopping mall in downtown Bangkok to denounce the country's May 22 coup despite a lockdown by soldiers of some of the city's major intersections.(AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Protester raise three fingers representing liberty, brotherhood and equality during an anti-coup demonstration in Bangkok, Thailand, Sunday, June 1, 2014. Hundreds of demonstrators shouting "Freedom!" and "Democracy!" gathered Sunday near a major shopping mall in downtown Bangkok to denounce the country's May 22 coup despite a lockdown by soldiers of some of the city's major intersections.(AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
In this Sunday, June 1, 2014 photo, an anti-coup protester gives a three-finger salute as soldiers keep eyes on him from an elevated walkway near a rally site in central Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's military rulers say they are monitoring the new form of silent resistance to the coup - borrowed from "The Hunger Games" - and will arrest those in large groups who ignore warnings to lower their arms. The raised arm salute has become an unofficial symbol of opposition to Thailand's May 22 coup, and a creative response to several bans the ruling junta has placed on freedom of expression. Some protesters in Thailand say it represents: liberty, equality, fraternity. (AP Photo/Thanyarat Doksone)
Protesters show three fingers representing liberty, brotherhood and equality during an anti-coup demonstration in Bangkok, Thailand Sunday, June 1, 2014. Hundreds of demonstrators shouting "Freedom!" and "Democracy!" gathered Sunday near a major shopping mall in downtown Bangkok to denounce the country's May 22 coup despite a lockdown by soldiers of some of the city's major intersections.(AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Protesters show three fingers representing liberty, brotherhood and equality during an anti-coup demonstration in Bangkok, Thailand Sunday, June 1, 2014. inside shopping mall in downtown Bangkok to denounce the country's May 22 coup despite a lockdown by soldiers of some of the city's major intersections.(AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
A protester wearing a mask shows three fingers representing liberty, brotherhood and equality during an anti-coup demonstration in Bangkok, Thailand Sunday, June 1, 2014. Hundreds of demonstrators shouting "Freedom!" and "Democracy!" gathered Sunday near a major shopping mall in downtown Bangkok to denounce the country's May 22 coup despite a lockdown by soldiers of some of the city's major intersections.(AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Protesters show three fingers representing liberty, brotherhood and equality during an anti-coup demonstration in Bangkok, Thailand Sunday, June 1, 2014. Hundreds of demonstrators shouting "Freedom!" and "Democracy!" gathered Sunday inside major shopping mall in downtown Bangkok to denounce the country's May 22 coup despite a lockdown by soldiers of some of the city's major intersections.(AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai soldiers guard at a convenience store to prevent anti-coup demonstration at Victory Monument Tuesday, June 3, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's military rulers said Tuesday they are monitoring a new form of silent resistance to the coup - a three-fingered salute borrowed from "The Hunger Games" - and will arrest those in large groups who ignore warnings to lower their arms.(AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai police officers leave Victory Monument after they finish guarding inside it Tuesday, June 3, 2014 in Bangkok. Thailand's military rulers said Tuesday they are monitoring a new form of silent resistance to the coup - a three-fingered salute borrowed from "The Hunger Games" - and will arrest those in large groups who ignore warnings to lower their arms.(AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai female soldiers entertain passers by while providing security at the Victory Monument in Bangkok, Thailand Tuesday, June 3, 2014. Thailand's military rulers say they are monitoring a new form of silent resistance to the coup - a three-fingered salute borrowed from "The Hunger Games" - and will arrest those in large groups who ignore warnings to lower their arms. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai police officers leave Victory Monument after they finish guarding inside it Tuesday, June 3, 2014 in Bangkok. Thailand's military rulers said Tuesday they are monitoring a new form of silent resistance to the coup - a three-fingered salute borrowed from "The Hunger Games" - and will arrest those in large groups who ignore warnings to lower their arms.(AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
A woman, center, takes photograph with Thai soldiers providing security at the Victory Monument in Bangkok, Thailand Tuesday, June 3, 2014. Thailand's military rulers say they are monitoring a new form of silent resistance to the coup - a three-fingered salute borrowed from "The Hunger Games" - and will arrest those in large groups who ignore warnings to lower their arms. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers entertain passers by while providing security at the Victory Monument in Bangkok, Thailand Tuesday, June 3, 2014. Thailand's military rulers say they are monitoring a new form of silent resistance to the coup - a three-fingered salute borrowed from "The Hunger Games" - and will arrest those in large groups who ignore warnings to lower their arms. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A mother, left, takes photograph of her son and Thai soldiers providing security at Victory Monument in Bangkok, Thailand Tuesday, June 3, 2014. Thailand's military rulers say they are monitoring a new form of silent resistance to the coup - a three-fingered salute borrowed from "The Hunger Games" - and will arrest those in large groups who ignore warnings to lower their arms. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Passers by hand food and drinks to Thai soldiers providing security at Victory Monument in Bangkok, Thailand Tuesday, June 3, 2014. Thailand's military rulers say they are monitoring a new form of silent resistance to the coup - a three-fingered salute borrowed from "The Hunger Games" - and will arrest those in large groups who ignore warnings to lower their arms. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A Thai soldier salutes while providing security at Victory Monument in Bangkok, Thailand Tuesday, June 3, 2014. Thailand's military rulers say they are monitoring a new form of silent resistance to the coup - a three-fingered salute borrowed from "The Hunger Games" - and will arrest those in large groups who ignore warnings to lower their arms. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
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