Guilty plea from marathon bombing suspect's friend

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Dzhokhar Tsarnaev trial - jury selection - Boston Marathon bombing
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Guilty plea from marathon bombing suspect's friend
Prosecutors want panels of the boat in which Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was found hiding to be brought to court to show jurors what they say is his written confession. His lawyers want them to see the entire bullet-ridden boat.
In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, second from right, is depicted with his lawyers, left, beside U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addresses a pool of potential jurors in a jury assembly room at the federal courthouse, Monday, Jan. 5, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. His trial is scheduled to begin on Jan. 26. He could face the death penalty if convicted. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, left, is depicted beside U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addresses a pool of potential jurors in a jury assembly room at the federal courthouse Monday, Jan. 5, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. His trial is scheduled to begin on Jan. 26, 2015. He could face the death penalty if convicted. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is depicted sitting in federal court in Boston Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014, for a final hearing before his trial begins in January. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. He could face the death penalty if convicted. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
Members of the legal defense team for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, including Miriam Conrad, far left, Timothy Watkins, second from left, William Fick, second from right, and Judy Clarke, far right, return to the federal courthouse after a lunch break in Boston on the first day of jury selection Monday, Jan. 5, 2015, in Tsarnaev's trial. Tsarnaev, 21, is accused of planning and carrying out the twin pressure-cooker bombings that killed three people and wounded more than 260 near the finish line of the race on April 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
Boston Marathon bombing victim Karen Brassard arrives at the federal courthouse in Boston, Monday, Jan. 5, 2015, for the first day of jury selection in the trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Tsarnaev, 21, is accused of planning and carrying out the twin pressure-cooker bombings that killed three people and wounded more than 260 near the finish line of the race on April 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
A U.S. Coast Guard boat patrols on Boston Harbor outside the federal courthouse in Boston, Monday, Jan. 5, 2015, for the first day of jury selection in the trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. The courthouse was under tight security, with dozens of police officers inside and outside the building. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
FILE - This panel of file photos shows attorneys David Bruck, left, Judy Clarke, center, and Miriam Conrad, right, who are the defense team for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Jury selection for Tsarnaev's trial is scheduled to begin Monday, Jan. 5, 2015, in federal court in Boston. (AP Photos/File)
FILE - This file photo released Friday, April 19, 2013 by the Federal Bureau of Investigation shows Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, charged with carrying out the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. Tsarnaev is scheduled to be in federal court in Boston Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014, for the final hearing before his trial begins in January. He could face the death penalty if convicted. (AP Photo/Federal Bureau of Investigation, File)
In this handout provided by the U.S. Department of Justice, a collection of fireworks that was found inside a backpack that belonged to Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev taken on an unspecified date and place. The backpack was recovered by law enforcement agents from a landfill in New Bedford, Massachusetts on April 26, 2013. His brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev is believed to have bought fireworks from a New Hampshire store in February and authorities are trying to determine whether gunpowder from the fireworks were used in the bombs. Today authorities arrested three additional men in connection with the Boston Marathon bombings. Azamat Tazhayakov and Dias Kadyrbayev who are alleged to have tried to conceal and destroy evidence to help the Tsarnaev brothers after the attacks, came to America to study at the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, where Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was also enrolled. The third person taken into custody is Robel Phillipos a U.S. citizen who is charged with lying to federal agents. (Photo by DOJ via Getty Images)
FILE - In this June 2, 2014, file courtroom sketch, Dias Kadyrbayev, left, testifies in federal court in Boston. Kadyrbayev, a native of Kazakhstan and friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, is charged with obstruction of justice and conspiracy for allegedly removing a backpack containing fireworks from Tsarnaev's dorm room after realizing he was suspected of carrying out the deadly 2013 attack. Kadyrbayev is scheduled to be in federal court in Boston, Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014 where he is expected to plead guilty to the charges. He was to go on trial in September. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins, File)
In this courtroom sketch, defendant Azamat Tazhayakov, foreground center, a college friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, is stands between his attorneys as the verdict is read in his federal trial, Monday, July 21, 2014 in Boston. Tazhayakov, of Kazakhstan, was convicted of obstruction of justice and conspiracy, impeding the investigation into the bombing. Prosecutors said he agreed with a plan by another friend, Dias Kadyrbayev, to remove Tsarnaev's backpack containing altered fireworks from his dorm room a few days after the 2013 bombings. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)
Defense Attorney Robert Stahl, left, guides Murat Kadyrbayev across the street outside of the Moakley Courthouse after they left his son, Dias Kadyrbayev's U.S. District Court hearing in Boston on August 13, 2013. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi for The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Robel Phillipos, of Cambridge, arrived with attorneys, family and friends at the Moakley Federal Courthouse. He is accused of lying to investigators. Dias Kadyrbayev and Azamat Tazhayakov face obstruction of justice charges for allegedly helping Tsarnaev hide evidence after the Boston Marathon bombings were also present at court. (Photo by David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Robert G. Stahl of the Law Offices of Robert G. Stahl, LLC, defending Dias Kadyrbayev, spoke with the media as he walked, after leaving the courthouse. Two men from Kazakhstan and a man from Cambridge were arrested and charged today in connection with the Boston Marathon bombings at the John Joseph Moakley Courthouse in Boston, Mass. on Wednesday, May 1, 2013. (Photo by Yoon S. Byun/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Robel Phillipos, center, a college friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, leaves federal court after a hearing, Tuesday, May 13, 2014, in Boston. Phillipos, of Cambridge, Mass., is charged with lying to investigators after last year's fatal bombing. Judge Douglas Woodlock ruled Tuesday that separate trials will be held for Phillipos and two other of Tsarnaev's friends, Azamat Tazhayakov and Dias Kadyrbayev, but that their trials do not need to be moved out of Massachusetts. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)
Robel Phillipos, a college friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, leaves federal court after a hearing Tuesday, May 13, 2014, in Boston. Phillipos, of Cambridge, Mass., is charged with lying to investigators after last year's fatal bombing. Judge Douglas Woodlock ruled Tuesday that separate trials will be held for Phillipos and two other of Tsarnaev's friends, Azamat Tazhayakov and Dias Kadyrbayev, but that their trials do not need to be moved out of Massachusetts. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)
Robel Phillipos leaves federal court Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, in Boston after he was arraigned on charges of hindering the investigation of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Phillipos pleaded not guilty to the charges. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)
Robel Phillipos, 20, one of four former classmates of Dzhokhar (Jahar) Tsarnaev to face federal charges related to the Marathon bombing, leaves the Moakley Federal Courthouse on October 6, 2014. The charges that they face, though not all the same, relate to the night of April 18, 2013, a few days after the bombing when photos of the two Tsarnaev brothers were publicized by the FBI and the pair was on the run. Phillipos, the only one free on bail. (Photo by David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
FILE - In a Monday, Oct. 27, 2014 file photo, Robel Phillipos, left, a college friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, departs federal court with defense attorney Derege Demissie, right, following jury deliberations in his trial, in Boston. Phillipos was convicted Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014 of lying during the investigation into the 2013 attack. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
Derege B. Demissie of Demissie & Church, defending Robel Phillipos, walked out of the courthouse. Two men from Kazakhstan and a man from Cambridge were arrested and charged today in connection with the Boston Marathon bombings at the John Joseph Moakley Courthouse in Boston, Mass. on Wednesday, May 1, 2013. (Photo by Yoon S. Byun/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
FILE - In this May 15, 2014 file photo, Robel Phillipos, a college friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, arrives at federal court before a hearing in Boston. Jury selection for his trial is set to begin on Monday, Sept. 29, 2014, in federal court in Boston. Phillipos, a U.S. citizen, is charged with lying to investigators after last year's fatal bombing. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
Amir Ismagulov, of Kazakhstan, and his family leave federal court where his son, Azamat Tazhayakov, and his son's friend, Dias Kadyrbayev, were arraigned Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013 in Boston. The two college friends of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev pleaded not guilty to allegations they conspired to obstruct justice by agreeing to destroy and conceal some of their friend's belongings as he evaded authorities. (AP Photo/Bill Sikes)
Amir Ismagulov, of Kazakhstan, kisses the hand of his daughter after speaking to media outside federal court where his son, Azamat Tazhayakov, and his son's friend Dias Kadyrbayev were arraigned Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013 in Boston. The two college friends of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev pleaded not guilty to allegations they conspired to obstruct justice by agreeing to destroy and conceal some of their friend's belongings as he evaded authorities. (AP Photo/Bill Sikes)
Attorneys for Robel Phillipos, Susan Church, left, and Derege Demissie, arrive at federal court Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014, in Boston. Phillipos, 21, of Cambridge, Mass., a college friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, is charged with lying to authorities investigating the bombing. A judge on Tuesday denied a motion to move next week's trial for Phillipos. Jury selection is set to begin Monday in U.S. District Court. Opening statements are scheduled for Oct. 6. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
Robel Phillipos, a college friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, left, arrives at federal court with attorney Derege Demissie, before a hearing Thursday, May 15, 2014, in Boston. Phillipos, of Cambridge, Mass., is charged with lying to investigators after last year's fatal bombing. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
Robel Phillipos, of Cambridge, arrived with attorneys, family and friends at the Moakley Federal Courthouse. He is accused of lying to investigators. Dias Kadyrbayev and Azamat Tazhayakov face obstruction of justice charges for allegedly helping Tsarnaev hide evidence after the Boston Marathon bombings were also present at court. (Photo by David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Newspapers in New York report on the Boston Marathon bombing
Newspapers at a newsstand in New York report on the Boston Marathon bombers
BOSTON - JANUARY 6: A Boston Police boat tied up to a pier behind the Moakley Courthouse, where the second day of jury selection took place in the upcoming trial of Dzohkhar Tsarnaev on January 6, 2015. (Photo by Wendy Maeda/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON - JANUARY 5: Jury selection for the trial of the Boston Marathon bomber started at Moakley Federal Court. A heavily armed Coast Guard boat patrolled the water off of the courthouse. (Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON - JANUARY 5: Jury selection for the trial of the Boston Marathon bomber started at Moakley Federal Court. A heavy police presence was seen outside the courthouse. (Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
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BY Denise Lavoie

BOSTON (AP) -- A college friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev pleaded guilty Thursday to impeding the investigation by removing incriminating evidence from Tsarnaev's dorm room several days after the deadly attack.

Dias Kadyrbayev, 20, admitted in federal court that he removed Tsarnaev's laptop computer and a backpack containing fireworks that had been emptied of their explosive powder from Tsarnaev's room at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth.

Twin bombs placed near the finish line of the 2013 marathon killed three people and injured more than 260.

Under a plea agreement, federal prosecutors said they would ask for no more than seven years in prison. The agreement allows his lawyer to argue for a lesser sentence. Kadyrbayev also agreed not to fight deportation after he completes his prison sentence.

U.S. District Judge Douglas Woodlock set sentencing for Nov. 18 but did not immediately accept the plea agreement, saying he first wanted to review a report that will be prepared by the probation department.

Kadyrbayev's decision to plead guilty came just two weeks before he was scheduled to go on trial and a month after his friend and co-conspirator, Azamat Tazhayakov, was convicted of identical charges by a jury.

During Tazhayakov's trial, prosecutors described Kadyrbayev as the leader in the decision to remove the items, but said Tazhayakov agreed with the plan. They said Kadyrbayev was the one who actually threw away the backpack and fireworks, which were later recovered in a landfill.

Kadyrbayev's lawyer, Robert Stahl, said his client made a "terrible error in judgment that he's paying for dearly."

Stahl emphasized that Kadyrbayev - a native of Kazakhstan who came to the U.S. in 2011 on a student visa - "had absolutely no knowledge" that Tsarnaev and his brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, were planning to bomb the marathon and was "shocked and horrified" when he learned they were suspects.

He said Kadyrbayev, who was 19 at the time, "now understands he never should have gone to that dorm room, and he never should have taken any items from that room."

His plea agreement with prosecutors does not make any mention of him agreeing to testify against a third friend who was also charged. Robel Phillipos, of Cambridge, is accused of lying to investigators about being present when Kadyrbayev took the items from Tsarnaev's room. Phillipos is scheduled to go on trial next month.

Typically, plea agreements describe whether defendants have given substantial assistance to prosecutors and have agreed to testify against co-defendants.

The backpack, fireworks and laptop were taken from Tsarnaev's room hours after the FBI publicly released photographs and videos of Tsarnaev and his brother as suspects in the bombing.

Prosecutors said Kadyrbayev exchanged text messages with Tsarnaev after seeing the photos, and Tsarnaev told him he could go to his dorm room and "take what's there."

Prosecutors said the fireworks had been emptied of explosive powder that can be used to make bombs.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev was killed in a shootout with police several days after the bombings. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has pleaded not guilty to 30 federal charges and faces the possibility of the death penalty if convicted. His trial is scheduled to begin in November.

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