US to provide South Sudan with $180M in food aid

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US to provide South Sudan with $180M in food aid
In this photo of Friday, July 25, 2014, Ertharin Cousin Executive Director of the United Nations World Food programme meets patients at IMC Nutrition program clinic in Malakal, South Sudan. Health experts are meeting in South Sudan’s capital, Juba, Monday July 28, 2014, debating exactly how severe the famine situation is in South Sudan, and their decision may prompt millions of dollars in aid or condemn tens of thousands of displaced people to continued hunger in what is described by Chris Hillbruner, the lead food security analyst for FEWSNET, a famine early warning system "is still the worst food security emergency in the world ... there is still huge need." (AP Photo/ Matthew Abbott)
In this photo dated Friday, July 25, 2014, A child with suspected malnutrition is weighed at IMC nutrition program clinic in Malakal, South Sudan, Health experts are meeting in South Sudan’s capital, Juba, Monday July 28, 2014, debating exactly how severe the famine situation is in South Sudan, and their decision may prompt millions of dollars in aid or condemn tens of thousands of displaced people to continued hunger in what is described by Chris Hillbruner, the lead food security analyst for FEWSNET, a famine early warning system "is still the worst food security emergency in the world ... there is still huge need." (AP Photo/ Matthew Abbott)
In this photo of Friday, July 25, 2014, a child with suspected malnutrition is examined at IMC nutrition program clinic in Malakal, South Sudan. Health experts are meeting in South Sudan’s capital, Juba, Monday July 28, 2014, debating exactly how severe the famine situation is in South Sudan, and their decision may prompt millions of dollars in aid or condemn tens of thousands of displaced people to continued hunger in what is described by Chris Hillbruner, the lead food security analyst for FEWSNET, a famine early warning system "is still the worst food security emergency in the world ... there is still huge need." (AP Photo/ Matthew Abbott)
In this photo of Friday, July 25, 2014, Workers unloading grain for food distribution from a WFP plane in Malakal, South Sudan. Health experts are meeting in South Sudan’s capital, Juba, Monday July 28, 2014, debating exactly how severe the famine situation is in South Sudan, and their decision may prompt millions of dollars in aid or condemn tens of thousands of displaced people to continued hunger in what is described by Chris Hillbruner, the lead food security analyst for FEWSNET, a famine early warning system "is still the worst food security emergency in the world ... there is still huge need." (AP Photo/ Matthew Abbott)
In this photo dated Thursday, July 24, 2014, People trudge along the main passageway through United Nations' Malakal Camp for Internally Displaced People, (IDP) during the wet season which has made life for hundreds of thousands of IDPs in South Sudan very challenging, in Malakal, Sudan. Health experts are meeting in South Sudan’s capital, Juba, Monday July 28, 2014, debating exactly how severe the famine situation is in South Sudan, and their decision may prompt millions of dollars in aid or condemn tens of thousands of displaced people to continued hunger in what is described by Chris Hillbruner, the lead food security analyst for FEWSNET, a famine early warning system "is still the worst food security emergency in the world ... there is still huge need." (AP Photo/ Matthew Abbott)
In this photo of Thursday, July 24, 2014, children moving a bag of grain through the mud with a wheel burrow from a food distribution through the new United Nations' Malakal Camp for Internally Displaced People, (IDP) during the wet season which has made life for hundreds of thousands of IDPs in South Sudan very challenging, in Malakal, Sudan. Health experts are meeting in South Sudan’s capital, Juba, Monday July 28, 2014, debating exactly how severe the famine situation is in South Sudan, and their decision may prompt millions of dollars in aid or condemn tens of thousands of displaced people to continued hunger in what is described by Chris Hillbruner, the lead food security analyst for FEWSNET, a famine early warning system "is still the worst food security emergency in the world ... there is still huge need." (AP Photo/ Matthew Abbott)
Workers offload sacks of cereals from a truck in Minkaman, South Sudan , Thursday, June 26, 2014. Once a month the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) distribute to over 100,000 internally displace people in Minkaman, the largest such camp in South Sudan. Averaging 8-10 thousand people a day it is a slow process, made more difficult by poor quality ration cards distributed by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) that have in some cases been destroyed. Depending on the size of the family they are distributed portions of Sorghum, Lentils, Oil and Salt. (AP Photo/Matthew Abbott
In this photo taken Thursday, June 5, 2014, displaced South-Sudanese wade through mud-filled paths between makeshift tents in the United Nations base which has become home to thousands of those displaced by recent fighting, in the town of Malakal, Upper Nile State, in South Sudan. While international donors last month pledged an additional $600 million to help the country upended by conflict, the seasonal rains now setting in are closing off many of the country's bad dirt roads and preventing the delivery by truck of food and other aid which must now be done by air, costing six or seven times as much. In addition, hundreds of cases of the water-borne disease cholera have been recorded in the last month, according to aid group Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders), which is proliferating in part because of the cramped and dirty environment seen in the U.N. camps housing tens of thousands of people seeking shelter from the violence. (AP Photo/Matthew Abbott)
In this photo taken Thursday, June 5, 2014, a displaced South-Sudanese man carries a goat as he and others wade through mud-filled paths between makeshift tents in the United Nations base which has become home to thousands of those displaced by recent fighting, in the town of Malakal, Upper Nile State, in South Sudan. While international donors last month pledged an additional $600 million to help the country upended by conflict, the seasonal rains now setting in are closing off many of the country's bad dirt roads and preventing the delivery by truck of food and other aid which must now be done by air, costing six or seven times as much. In addition, hundreds of cases of the water-borne disease cholera have been recorded in the last month, according to aid group Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders), which is proliferating in part because of the cramped and dirty environment seen in the U.N. camps housing tens of thousands of people seeking shelter from the violence. (AP Photo/Matthew Abbott)
In this photo taken Thursday, June 5, 2014, displaced children wash themselves on the muddy bank of a river just outside the United Nations base which has become home to thousands of those displaced by recent fighting, in the town of Malakal, Upper Nile State, in South Sudan. While international donors last month pledged an additional $600 million to help the country upended by conflict, the seasonal rains now setting in are closing off many of the country's bad dirt roads and preventing the delivery by truck of food and other aid which must now be done by air, costing six or seven times as much. In addition, hundreds of cases of the water-borne disease cholera have been recorded in the last month, according to aid group Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders), which is proliferating in part because of the cramped and dirty environment seen in the U.N. camps housing tens of thousands of people seeking shelter from the violence. (AP Photo/Matthew Abbott)
In this photo taken Tuesday, April 1, 2014, a South Sudanese woman poses with her World Food Programme (WFP) card which she uses to receive food and other aid, in Nyal, Unity State, South Sudan. Desperate South Sudan villagers, fleeing fighting across the country, are eating grass and roots to survive as WFP starts costly air drops of food, three times more expensive than road deliveries, to northern parts of the country, straining the ramped-up humanitarian response because only a third of the U.N.'s requested $1.27 billion has been raised for the crisis. (AP Photo/Ilya Gridneff)
In this photo taken Tuesday, April 1, 2014, a South Sudanese family distributes cooking oil received from the World Food Programme (WFP) via air drop in Nyal, Unity State, South Sudan. Desperate South Sudan villagers, fleeing fighting across the country, are eating grass and roots to survive as WFP starts costly air drops of food, three times more expensive than road deliveries, to northern parts of the country, straining the ramped-up humanitarian response because only a third of the U.N.'s requested $1.27 billion has been raised for the crisis. (AP Photo/Ilya Gridneff)
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By JULIE PACE

EDGARTOWN, Mass. (AP) - The United States is providing $180 million in emergency aid to address a food crisis in South Sudan.

White House National Security Adviser Susan Rice says the people of South Sudan face the worst food shortage in the world. She blamed the suffering of the South Sudanese on their leaders' inability to put the people's interests ahead of their own.

The money for the food aid is coming from USAID, as well as a Department of Agriculture trust.

The White House says the U.S. has already provided South Sudan with more than $456 million in humanitarian aid, but more is needed because of the threat of famine.


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