Obama's great-uncle Charles Payne dies at age 89

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Obama's great-uncle Charles Payne dies at age 89
FILE - This July 22, 2008 file photo shows Charles T. Payne, President Obama’s great-uncle, during an interview with The Associated Press in Chicago. Payne is the brother of Obama’s maternal grandmother, Madelyn Payne Dunham. Payne died Friday, Aug. 1, 2014, in Chicago of non-Hodgkins lymphoma, his wife Melanie said. He was 89. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty, File)
FILE - This July 22, 2008 file photo shows Charles T. Payne, President Obama’s great-uncle, during an interview with The Associated Press in Chicago. Payne is the brother of Obama’s maternal grandmother, Madelyn Payne Dunham. Payne died Friday, Aug. 1, 2014, in Chicago of non-Hodgkins lymphoma, his wife Melanie said. He was 89. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty, File)
Visitors walk over the gravel ground in the former Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar, Germany, on Thursday, June 4, 2009 on the route which U.S. President Barak Obama will take along the remains of the camp blocks during his visit to the memorial site on Friday, June 5, 2009. President Obama's uncle, Charles T. Payne, helped liberate the camp at the end of World War II. On April 11, 1945, units of the 3rd US Army reached Ettersberg Hill in Buchenwald. More than 250.000 people were held captive in the camp between 1937 and 1945, and more than 50.000 of them died during that time. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
Visitors walk behind of the entrance gate in the former Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar, Germany, on Thursday, June 4, 2009. U.S. President Barak Obama will take a walk along the remains of the camp blocks during his visit to the memorial site on Friday, June 5, 2009. President Obama's uncle, Charles T. Payne, helped liberate the camp at the end of World War II. On April 11, 1945, units of the 3rd US Army reached Ettersberg Hill in Buchenwald. More than 250.000 people were held captive in the camp between 1937 and 1945, and more than 50.000 of them died during that time. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
Policemam patrols in the former Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar, Germany, on Thursday, June 4, 2009. U.S. President Barack Obama is planning to visit the former Nazi concentration camp near Weimar, on Friday, June 5, 2009, which his uncle, Charles T. Payne, helped liberate at the end of World War II. On April 11, 1945, units of the 3rd US Army reached Ettersberg Hill in Buchenwald. More than 250.000 people were held captive in the camp between 1937 and 1945, and more than 50.000 of them died during that time. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)
Visitors walk in front of the entrance building in the former Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar, Germany, on Thursday, June 4, 2009. U.S. President Barack Obama is planning to visit the former Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar on Friday, June 5, 2009, which his uncle, Charles T. Payne, helped liberate at the end of World War II, on June 5th, 2009. On April 11, 1945, units of the 3rd US Army reached Ettersberg Hill in Buchenwald. More than 250.000 people were held captive in the camp between 1937 and 1945, and more than 50.000 of them died during that time. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)
A cameraman checks his equipment in the former Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar, Germany, on Thursday, June 4, 2009. U.S. President Barack Obama is planning to visit the former Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar, on Friday, June 5, 2009, which his uncle, Charles T. Payne, helped liberate at the end of World War II. On April 11, 1945, units of the 3rd US Army reached Ettersberg Hill in Buchenwald. More than 250.000 people were held captive in the camp between 1937 and 1945, and more than 50.000 of them died during that time. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)
Policemen walk behind the memorial 'Little Camp' in the former Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar, Germany, on Thursday, June 4, 2009. The Little Camp was created in 2001/2002 as a joint project of the United State Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad and the Buchenwald Memorial. It was financed by donations from the U.S. U.S. President Barack Obama is planning to visit the former Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar on Friday, June 5, 2009, which his uncle, Charles T. Payne, helped liberate at the end of World War II. On April 11, 1945, units of the 3rd US Army reached Ettersberg Hill in Buchenwald. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)
A cameraman checks his equipment in the former Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar, Germany, on Thursday, June 4, 2009. U.S. President Barack Obama is planning to visit the former Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar, on Friday, June 5, 2009, which his uncle, Charles T. Payne, helped liberate at the end of World War II. On April 11, 1945, units of the 3rd US Army reached Ettersberg Hill in Buchenwald. More than 250.000 people were held captive in the camp between 1937 and 1945, and more than 50.000 of them died during that time. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)
Policemam patrols in the former Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar, Germany, on Thursday, June 4, 2009. U.S. President Barack Obama is planning to visit the former Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar, on Friday, June 5, 2009, which his uncle, Charles T. Payne, helped liberate at the end of World War II. On April 11, 1945, units of the 3rd US Army reached Ettersberg Hill in Buchenwald. More than 250.000 people were held captive in the camp between 1937 and 1945, and more than 50.000 of them died during that time. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)
Cakes named 'Obama Americans' are seen in a bakery in Weimar, central Germany, on Friday, May 29, 2009. President Barack Obama is planning to visit Weimar, specifically Buchenwald Nazi concentration camp, which his uncle, Charles T. Payne, helped liberate at the end of World War II, on June 5th, 2009. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)
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CHICAGO (AP) -- President Obama's great-uncle, World War II veteran Charles T. Payne, has died.

Payne's wife of 50 years, Melanie Payne, says her husband died Aug. 1 in Chicago of non-Hodgkins lymphoma. He was 89.

Payne helped liberate a Nazi concentration camp during the war, and he later became a pioneer in library science at the University of Chicago.

He briefly became part of the news during the 2008 presidential campaign when Obama mistakenly said his Uncle Charlie had helped liberate Auschwitz. Payne's infantry division liberated Ohrdruf, a subcamp of the Buchenwald concentration camp.

Payne told The Associated Press at the time that he was "truly astonished" by the attention paid to Obama's flub, and called his nephew "truly an astounding young man."

Payne was the brother of Obama's maternal grandmother.

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