Fight brews over separate trial for 9/11 suspect

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Fight brews over separate trial for 9/11 suspect
399770 02: A video image released by the FBI January 17, 2002 shows Ramzi Binalshibh, the suspected al Qaeda member who is accused of helping plan the September 11 attacks, has been captured in Pakistan, U.S. officials said September 13, 2002. Binalshibh was caught after a deadly shootout in which two other al Qaeda members were killed. Officials say Binalshibh tried to enter the U.S. four seperate occasions but was denied a visa each time. Officials believe he intended to join the 19 hijackers. (Photo by Getty Images)
ARCHIV: Pakistan police escort an unidentified gunman who was arrested after a gunbattle between police and suspected al-Qaida members in Karachi, Pakistan. A local police officer identified the man in this photo as Ramzi Binalshibh, believed to be a key planner of the Sept. 11 terror attacks (Foto vom 11.09.02). Ramzi Binalshibh, der ehemals mit Mohammed Atta in einer Hamburger Wohngemeinschaft lebte, ist der sogenannte Koordinator der Anschlaege vom 11. September 2001. Er war urspruenglich als 20. Attentaeter vorgesehen, erhielt aber trotz mehrfacher Versuche kein US-Visum. (zu dapd-Text) Foto: Itsuo Inouye/AP/dapd
In this Pentagon-approved sketch by court artist Janet Hamlin, Judge, Army Col. James Pohl halts the Sept. 11 pretrial hearing at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base in Cuba, Thursday April 17, 2014. An effort to prosecute the self-proclaimed mastermind of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack and four co-defendants veered off track again as a pretrial hearing ended with new obstacles that threaten to further derail the case before a military tribunal at Guantanamo Bay. (AP Photo/Janet Hamlin, Pool)
In this pool photo of a Pentagon-approved sketch by court artist Janet Hamlin, defendant Ramzi Binalshibh, center, attends his pretrial hearing along with other defendants at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base in Cuba, Monday, April 14, 2014. From right to left are Mustafa al Hawsawi, partially cut off, Ali Abdul Aziz Ali, Ramzi Binalshibh, Walid bin Attash and Khalid Sheikh Mohammad. A lawyer for one of five defendants in the Sept. 11 war crimes tribunal said Monday that FBI agents questioned a member of his defense team, apparently in an investigation related to the handling of evidence, a revelation that brought an abrupt halt to proceedings. The disclosure came at the start of what was supposed to be a mental competency hearing for Harrington's client, Ramzi Binalshibh, a Yemeni accused of providing logistical support to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist plot. (AP Photo/Janet Hamlin, Pool)
In this pool photo of a Pentagon-approved sketch by court artist Janet Hamlin, defendant Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, left, speaks with lead defense lawyer David Nevin during a pretrial hearing at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base in Cuba, Monday, April 14, 2014. A lawyer for one of five defendants in the Sept. 11 war crimes tribunal said Monday that FBI agents questioned a member of his defense team, apparently in an investigation related to the handling of evidence, a revelation that brought an abrupt halt to proceedings. (AP Photo/Janet Hamlin, Pool)
A U.S. trooper jogs at the tent city which makes up the legal complex of the U.S. Military Commissions, at Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, in Cuba, Wednesday, June 4, 2008. Alleged 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed has told a military judge he wants the death sentence so he can be a martyr. Mohammed made the statement Thursday June 5, 2008 after Judge Ralph Kohlmann, a Marine colonel, told him he could face the death penalty if convicted of war crimes. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, Pool)
A courtroom drawing by artist Janet Hamlin, reviewed by the US military, shows one-time Office of Military Commissions legal advisor Brigadier General Thomas Hartmann, right, testifying in a pre-trial hearing for Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and co-defendants on charges related to the 9/11 attacks presided over by Judge Army Colonel Stephen Henley, left, in Camp Justice on the U.S. Naval Base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Monday, Dec. 8, 2008. The five men said Monday they want to confess to a war-crimes court to carrying out the bloodiest attacks on U.S. soil as victims' relatives looked on. (AP Photo/Janet Hamlin, Pool)
A courtoom drawing by artist Janet Hamlin, reviewed by the US military, shows victim family members Maureen Santora, right and Hamilton Peterson, second from right, watching as Judge Army Col. Stephen Henley, top right, presides over a pre-trial session for Khalid Sheikh Mohammed,left top, and co-defendants Walid Bin Attash, left, second from top, Ramzi Bin al Shibh, left, third from top, Ali Abudl Aziz Ali, left fourth from top and Mustafa al-Hawsawi, left, fifth from top, Monday Dec. 8, 2008 in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Santora is the mother of New York City firefighter Christopher Santora of Engine 54 who was killed when in the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center. Peterson's father, Donald Peterson, and stepmother Jean Peterson were killed when United flight 93 crashed into the Pennsylvania countryside. (AP Photo/Janet Hamlin, Pool)
This Pentagon-approved sketch by court artist Janet Hamlin, shows Kevin Driscoll, from left to right, Maia Miller, and Fernando Compoamor Sanchez, a team of lawyers brought in by the U.S. to address an FBI probe that occurred with the defense, during the Sept. 11 pretrial hearings at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base in Cuba, Monday, June 16, 2014. Lawyers for Guantanamo prisoners charged in the Sept. 11 attack say the FBI has questioned more support staff on their legal teams, a development that may prompt a new detour in an already snarled case as the war crimes tribunal reconvened Monday at this U.S. base. (AP Photo/Janet Hamlin, Pool)
In this Pentagon-approved sketch by court artist Janet Hamlin, self-proclaimed Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammad attends pretrial hearings in at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base in Cuba, Monday, June 16, 2014. Lawyers for Guantanamo prisoners charged in the Sept. 11 attack say the FBI has questioned more support staff on their legal teams, a development that may prompt a new detour in an already snarled case as the war crimes tribunal reconvened Monday at this U.S. base. (AP Photo/Janet Hamlin, Pool)
In this Pentagon-approved sketch by court artist Janet Hamlin, the Sept. 11 accused co-conspirators attend a pretrial hearing at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base in Cuba, Monday, June 16, 2014. David Nevin, defense council for Khalid Sheik Mohammad is at podium addressing presiding Judge James Pohl. The accused, right to left: Khalid Sheikh Mohmmad, Walid bin Attash, Ramzi bin al shibh, Aziz Ali, Mustafa al Hawsawi. Lawyers for Guantanamo prisoners charged in the Sept. 11 attack say the FBI has questioned more people who work as support staff on their legal teams than previously disclosed, a development that may prompt a new detour in an already snarled case as the war crimes tribunal reconvened Monday at this U.S. base. (AP Photo/Janet Hamlin, Pool)
In this Pentagon-approved sketch by court artist Janet Hamlin, the Sept. 11 accused co-conspirators attend a pretrial hearing the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base in Cuba, Monday, June 16, 2014. Defense council James Herrington is at podium addressing presiding Judge James Pohl. The accused, right to left: Khalid Sheikh Mohmmad, Walid bin Attash, Ramzi bin al shibh, Aziz Ali, Mustafa al Hawsawi. Lawyers for Guantanamo prisoners charged in the Sept. 11 attack say the FBI has questioned more people who work as support staff on their legal teams than previously disclosed, a development that may prompt a new detour in an already snarled case as the war crimes tribunal reconvened Monday at this U.S. base. (AP Photo/Janet Hamlin, Pool)
GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA - JUNE 5: (EDITORS NOTE: THIS IMAGE WAS REVIEWED BY U.S. MILITARY) Scott McKay (C), defense lawyer for Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, walks with part of the defense team for Ramzi Binalshibh, during a break in the arraignment proceedings for the September 11 co-conspirator suspects, at the U.S. Military Commissions, June 5, 2008 in Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the accused mastermind of the attacks on September 11, 2001 and four alleged conspirators faced a military judge in Guantanamo June 5, in their first appearance before a war-crimes tribunal. (Photo by Brennan Linsley-PoolGetty Images)
In this image reviewed by the US Military, Scott McKay, (C) defense lawyer for Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, walks with part of the defense team for Ramzi Binalshibh, during a break in the arraignment proceedings for the September 11, 2001 co-conspirator suspects, at the US Military Commissions, at Guantanamo Bay US Naval Base, in Cuba,on June 5, 2008. Binalshibh's lawyers are, Navy Commander Suzanne Lachelier(L), and Tom Durkin (R). AFP PHOTO/POOL/Brennan Linsley (Photo credit should read BRENNAN LINSLEY/AFP/Getty Images)
This June 5, 2008 photo shows the entrance near the new courtroom at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Five men accused of plotting the September 11, 2001 attacks appeared in public for the first time in years Thursday at the start of a US military hearing at the Guantanamo Bay base. All dressed in white and without handcuffs, the five, including Khaled Sheikh Mohammed, the alleged mastermind of the attacks which killed some 3,000 people, were seated at a table with their military defense team. Sheikh Mohammed, a Pakistani, and his alleged co-conspirators Ramzi Binalshibh, Ali Abd al-Aziz Ali, Wallid bin Attash and Mustapha al-Hawsawi all face the death penalty if convicted by the military commission on the US base on Cuba. AFP PHOTO/Fanny CARRIER (Photo credit should read Fanny Carrier/AFP/Getty Images)
HAMBURG, GERMANY: From left: Prosecutors Gerhard Hummer, Matthias Krauss and Walter Hemberger arrive for the second session of the retrial of Moroccan defendant Mounir el Motassadeq in the northern German town of Hamburg, 11 August 2004. US authorities told the German court that a terror suspect in their custody had exonerated Motassadeq on trial for involvement in the September 11, 2001 attacks. Ramzi Binalshibh, a Yemeni who has boasted he masterminded the suicide hijackings, reportedly told US authorities that Mounir El Motassadeq was unaware of the plot. AFP PHOTO DPA POOL/MAURIZIO GAMBARINI (Photo credit should read MAURIZIO GAMBARINI/AFP/Getty Images)
399771 03: US Attorney General John Ashcroft (R) and FBI Director Robert Mueller watch a video of suspected al Qaeda terrorists during a press conference January 17, 2002 in Wahington, DC. The government released photos (L) and video excerpts of five suspected al Qaeda members delivering what Ashcroft described as 'martyrdom messages from suicide terrorists'''' and identified four of the five men depicted in the video as (clock wise from top L) Abd Al-Rahim, Muhammad Sa''id Ali Hasan, Khalid Ibn Muhammad Al-Juhani unidentified individual and Ramzi Binalshibh. (Photo by Manny Ceneta/Getty Images)
FILE - In this Aug. 23, 2013 pool file photo reviewed by the U.S. Department of Defense, one of Guantanamo Bay's two courthouses is seen through a broken window at Camp Justice at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba. On Monday, April 14, 2014 a judge in Guantanamo will open a hearing into the sanity of prisoner Ramzi Binalshibh, whose courtroom outbursts about alleged mistreatment in Camp 7 have halted the effort to try five men in the Sept. 11 attacks, all of whom are held there. (AP Photo/Toronto Star, Michelle Shephard, Pool, File)
Der Marokkaner Abdelghani Mzoudi sitzt am Donnerstag, 11. Dez.2003, im Verhandlungssaal des Hamburger Landgerichtes. Ueberraschend verkuendete der Vorsitzende Richter Klaus Ruehle am Donnerstag die Entlassung des 31-jaehrigen Mzoudi. Grund sind neue Aussagen, die wahrscheinlich von dem mutmasslichen Anschlagsplaner Ramzi Binalshibh stammen und wonach Mzoudi nicht zur Hamburger Terrorzelle gehoert, die fuer die Anschlaege vom 11. Sept. 2001 in den USA verantwortlich gemacht wird. (AP Photo/ Kay Nietfeld, POOL) --Agdelghani Mzoudi smiles during his trial in a Hamburg, northern Germany, court room Thursday, Dec. 11, 2003. The court ordered Mzoudi, who was accused of supporting the Sept. 11 al-Qaida cell in Hamburg, freed from custody based on a statement that said only the three Hamburg-based suicide hijackers and their alleged al-Qaida liaison were involved in the plot. (AP Photo/ Kay Nietfeld, POOL)
** RETRANSMITTED TO ADD INFORMATION ABOUT IDENTIFICATION ** Pakistan police escort an unidentified gunman who was arrested after a gunbattle between police and suspected al-Qaida members in Karachi, Pakistan, in this Sept. 11, 2002 photo. A local police officer identified the man in this photos as Ramzi Binalshibh, believed to be a key planner of the Sept. 11 terror attacks. Speaking to reporters Saturday, Sept. 14, 2002, Interior Minister Moinuddin Haider did not come out and say that Binalshibh was among the suspects arrested. However, when he was told that media reports from the United States said Binalshibh was in custody, Haider replied: "He was arrested in this operation."(AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye)
Armed police hustle a blindfolded suspect from a building in Karachi, Pakistan, on Wednesday Sept. 11, 2002, following a prolonged gun battle in which two suspects were killed and five men captured. It is claimed Friday Sept.14, 2002, that one of the suspects captured in the opperation is Ramzi Binalshibh, who is one of America's most wanted men in connection with the September 11, US terrorist attacks. (AP photo/APTN) ** TV OUT **
The old federal courthouse, right, at 40 Centre Street in New York is see on Monday, Nov. 16, 2009. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the professed mastermind of 9/11, and four of his alleged henchmen are headed for a federal civilian trial in New York; five others, including a top suspect in the bombing of the USS Cole, will be tried by a military commission (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
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FORT MEADE, Md. (AP) -- Federal prosecutors are asking a military judge to reconsider his decision to try one of the men accused of plotting the Sept. 11 terror attacks apart from the other four.

Prosecutors are asking Army Col. James Pohl to hear arguments on their emergency motion involving Ramzi Binalshibh (RAM'-zee bin-al-SHEEB') first thing Monday at a pretrial hearing at the Guantanamo Bay naval base in Cuba.

Pohl ruled July 24 that Binalshibh should get a separate war crimes trial because legal issues peculiar to him were preventing the larger case from moving forward.

Attorneys for another defendant oppose the government's request to have the reconsideration motion heard first. That would delay arguments on their motion to sever their client's case.

The hearing is being shown in a video feed at Fort Meade.

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