One of the biggest great white sharks ever caught on tape

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'Jaws Strikes Back': One of the Biggest Great Whites Ever Filmed

Nicknamed 'Deep Blue,' this great white is almost as long as the 22-foot-long boat the researchers were aboard near Guadalupe, Mexico, nearly 165 miles away from mainland.

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One of the biggest great white sharks ever caught on tape
GUADALUPE ISLAND, MEXICO - DATE UNSPECIFIED: ***EXCLUSIVE*** These stunning photographs show a scuba diver swimming astonishingly close to a deadly 12 foot great white shark. Taken by top-adventure photographer Amos Nachoum, the images were shot during August of this year. Taken as part of the human interaction section of Amos' Big Animals World Class Photography expeditions, the human diver is Fernando, Amos' Mexican assistant. Regularly taking groups of up to six people diving with great white sharks, Amos has run Big Animals for almost 20 years. (Photo by Amos Nachoun / Barcroft USA / Getty Images)
In this photo released by Sea Shepherd, a male tiger shark hangs tied up on a fishing boat off Moses Rock on the Western Australian coast, Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014. The shark catch was part of Western Australia's controversial shark cull policy. The government began placing baited hooks on drum lines off popular beaches in the state capital Perth and to the south to kill white, bull and tiger sharks over three meters (10 feet) long. The policy is a response to seven fatal shark attacks in Australia's southwest in three years. (AP Photo/Sea Shepherd)
This photo released by the Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department shows the surfboard being ridden by 39-year-old surfer Francisco Javier Solorio Jr., who was fatally attacked by a shark Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012. An expert has determined that Solorio was killed by a 15- to 16-foot great white shark, according to Ralph Collier of the Shark Research Committee. He was bitten in the upper torso in the waters off Surf Beach on Vandenberg Air Force Base in Santa Barbara County and died at the scene despite a friend's efforts to save him. (AP Photo/Santa Barbara County Sheriff)
Eric Tarantino leaves a San Jose, Calif., hospital Monday, Oct. 31, 2011, after he was attacked by a shark at Marina State Beach on Saturday. Tarantino, 27, was bitten on the neck, arm and hands. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
WILD COAST, SOUTH AFRICA - UNDATED. EXCLUSIVE: An oceanic black tip shark hunts for prey during this years 'sardine run' on the Wild Coast in South Africa. From May to July millions of sardines migrate across these water providing a feeding bonanza for dolphin, sharks and birds. Millions of desperate sardines swam the 170 miles gauntlet of snapping sharks, dolphins and birds who all took part in a feeding bonanza during this years 'sardine run'. The movement of the ten mile long mass of fish is widely hailed as one of natures greatest spectacles off the coast of southern Africa takes place from May to July. World-class Russian photographer, Alexander Sefonov, 36, donned his scuba gear and jumped into the underwater fray to capture this incredible natural phenomenon. 'The sardines migrate along the Wild Coast every year for reasons not completely understood by science,' explained Alexander. 'This is one of the most spectacular natural events on the planet - but also puzzle box full of unanswered questions for the science.' The unexplained sardine journey takes the silvery fish from the warmer waters of the Indian Ocean to the west and into the colder Atlantic. Because of the narrow underwater shelf they must swim through the sardines - or pilchards as they are also known - must travel close to shore where they encounter more deadly predators. (Photo by Alexander Safonov / Barcroft Med / Getty Images)
WILD COAST, SOUTH AFRICA - UNDATED. EXCLUSIVE: Oceanic black tip sharks hunt for prey during this years 'sardine run' on the Wild Coast in South Africa. From May to July millions of sardines migrate across these water providing a feeding bonanza for dolphin, sharks and birds. Millions of desperate sardines swam the 170 miles gauntlet of snapping sharks, dolphins and birds who all took part in a feeding bonanza during this years 'sardine run'. The movement of the ten mile long mass of fish is widely hailed as one of natures greatest spectacles off the coast of southern Africa takes place from May to July. World-class Russian photographer, Alexander Sefonov, 36, donned his scuba gear and jumped into the underwater fray to capture this incredible natural phenomenon. 'The sardines migrate along the Wild Coast every year for reasons not completely understood by science,' explained Alexander. 'This is one of the most spectacular natural events on the planet - but also puzzle box full of unanswered questions for the science.' The unexplained sardine journey takes the silvery fish from the warmer waters of the Indian Ocean to the west and into the colder Atlantic. Because of the narrow underwater shelf they must swim through the sardines - or pilchards as they are also known - must travel close to shore where they encounter more deadly predators. (Photo by Alexander Safonov / Barcroft Med / Getty Images)
WILD COAST, SOUTH AFRICA - UNDATED. EXCLUSIVE: An oceanic black tip shark hunts for prey during this years 'sardine run' on on the Wild Coast in South Africa. From May to July millions of sardines migrate across these water providing a feeding bonanza for dolphin, sharks and birds. Millions of desperate sardines swam the 170 miles gauntlet of snapping sharks, dolphins and birds who all took part in a feeding bonanza during this years 'sardine run'. The movement of the ten mile long mass of fish is widely hailed as one of natures greatest spectacles off the coast of southern Africa takes place from May to July. World-class Russian photographer, Alexander Sefonov, 36, donned his scuba gear and jumped into the underwater fray to capture this incredible natural phenomenon. 'The sardines migrate along the Wild Coast every year for reasons not completely understood by science,' explained Alexander. 'This is one of the most spectacular natural events on the planet - but also puzzle box full of unanswered questions for the science.' The unexplained sardine journey takes the silvery fish from the warmer waters of the Indian Ocean to the west and into the colder Atlantic. Because of the narrow underwater shelf they must swim through the sardines - or pilchards as they are also known - must travel close to shore where they encounter more deadly predators. (Photo by Alexander Safonov / Barcroft Med / Getty Images)
WILD COAST, SOUTH AFRICA - UNDATED. EXCLUSIVE: An oceanic black tip shark hunts for prey during this years 'sardine run' on the Wild Coast in South Africa. From May to July millions of sardines migrate across these water providing a feeding bonanza for dolphin, sharks and birds. Millions of desperate sardines swam the 170 miles gauntlet of snapping sharks, dolphins and birds who all took part in a feeding bonanza during this years 'sardine run'. The movement of the ten mile long mass of fish is widely hailed as one of natures greatest spectacles off the coast of southern Africa takes place from May to July. World-class Russian photographer, Alexander Sefonov, 36, donned his scuba gear and jumped into the underwater fray to capture this incredible natural phenomenon. 'The sardines migrate along the Wild Coast every year for reasons not completely understood by science,' explained Alexander. 'This is one of the most spectacular natural events on the planet - but also puzzle box full of unanswered questions for the science.' The unexplained sardine journey takes the silvery fish from the warmer waters of the Indian Ocean to the west and into the colder Atlantic. Because of the narrow underwater shelf they must swim through the sardines - or pilchards as they are also known - must travel close to shore where they encounter more deadly predators. (Photo by Alexander Safonov / Barcroft Med / Getty Images)
BEQA LAGOON, FIJI: UNDATED: *** EXCLUSIVE *** White Tip Reef Shark at Beqa Lagoon, Fiji. It is one of the world's most shark-infested patches of water yet this lagoon off Fiji manages to draw hundreds of divers every year. For most people the possibility of coming face to face with hungry sharks in one dive would be enough to have them rooted to dry land, but there is a breed of nature lovers who get a thrill from being that close to the deadly predators. Underwater photographer Alexander Safonov while on a diving trip the Beqa Lagoon south of the Fijian island of Viti Levu in May. Harbouring eight species of sharks divers can interact with Whitetip Reef Sharks, Blacktip Reef Sharks, Grey Sharks, Tawny Nurse Sharks, Sicklefin Lemon Sharks, Silvertip Sharks, Bull Sharks and Tiger Sharks. Beqa Lagoon is one of the world's very few shark sanctuaries, set up to protect the many species nearby from the harmful effects of overfishing on their food supplies. Established in 2004 the Shark Reef Marine Reserve is dedicated to the protection of Sharks. (Photo by Alexander Safonov / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
BEQA LAGOON, FIJI: UNDATED: *** EXCLUSIVE *** Shot taken of bull shark from below at Beqa Lagoon, Fiji. It is one of the world's most shark-infested patches of water yet this lagoon off Fiji manages to draw hundreds of divers every year. For most people the possibility of coming face to face with hungry sharks in one dive would be enough to have them rooted to dry land, but there is a breed of nature lovers who get a thrill from being that close to the deadly predators. Underwater photographer Alexander Safonov while on a diving trip the Beqa Lagoon south of the Fijian island of Viti Levu in May. Harbouring eight species of sharks divers can interact with Whitetip Reef Sharks, Blacktip Reef Sharks, Grey Sharks, Tawny Nurse Sharks, Sicklefin Lemon Sharks, Silvertip Sharks, Bull Sharks and Tiger Sharks. Beqa Lagoon is one of the world's very few shark sanctuaries, set up to protect the many species nearby from the harmful effects of overfishing on their food supplies. Established in 2004 the Shark Reef Marine Reserve is dedicated to the protection of Sharks. (Photo by Alexander Safonov / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
BEQA LAGOON, FIJI: UNDATED: *** EXCLUSIVE *** Scuba diver gets close to bull shark at Beqa Lagoon, Fiji. It is one of the world's most shark-infested patches of water yet this lagoon off Fiji manages to draw hundreds of divers every year. For most people the possibility of coming face to face with hungry sharks in one dive would be enough to have them rooted to dry land, but there is a breed of nature lovers who get a thrill from being that close to the deadly predators. Underwater photographer Alexander Safonov while on a diving trip the Beqa Lagoon south of the Fijian island of Viti Levu in May. Harbouring eight species of sharks divers can interact with Whitetip Reef Sharks, Blacktip Reef Sharks, Grey Sharks, Tawny Nurse Sharks, Sicklefin Lemon Sharks, Silvertip Sharks, Bull Sharks and Tiger Sharks. Beqa Lagoon is one of the world's very few shark sanctuaries, set up to protect the many species nearby from the harmful effects of overfishing on their food supplies. Established in 2004 the Shark Reef Marine Reserve is dedicated to the protection of Sharks. (Photo by Alexander Safonov / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
BEQA LAGOON, FIJI: UNDATED: *** EXCLUSIVE *** It is one of the world's most shark-infested patches of water yet this lagoon off Fiji manages to draw hundreds of divers every year. For most people the possibility of coming face to face with hungry sharks in one dive would be enough to have them rooted to dry land, but there is a breed of nature lovers who get a thrill from being that close to the deadly predators. Underwater photographer Alexander Safonov while on a diving trip the Beqa Lagoon south of the Fijian island of Viti Levu in May. Harbouring eight species of sharks divers can interact with Whitetip Reef Sharks, Blacktip Reef Sharks, Grey Sharks, Tawny Nurse Sharks, Sicklefin Lemon Sharks, Silvertip Sharks, Bull Sharks and Tiger Sharks. Beqa Lagoon is one of the world's very few shark sanctuaries, set up to protect the many species nearby from the harmful effects of overfishing on their food supplies. Established in 2004 the Shark Reef Marine Reserve is dedicated to the protection of Sharks. (Photo by Alexander Safonov / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
BEQA LAGOON, FIJI: UNDATED: *** EXCLUSIVE *** A diver swims with a grey reef shark in Beqa Lagon, Fiji. It is one of the world's most shark-infested patches of water yet this lagoon off Fiji manages to draw hundreds of divers every year. For most people the possibility of coming face to face with hungry sharks in one dive would be enough to have them rooted to dry land, but there is a breed of nature lovers who get a thrill from being that close to the deadly predators. Underwater photographer Alexander Safonov while on a diving trip the Beqa Lagoon south of the Fijian island of Viti Levu in May. Harbouring eight species of sharks divers can interact with Whitetip Reef Sharks, Blacktip Reef Sharks, Grey Sharks, Tawny Nurse Sharks, Sicklefin Lemon Sharks, Silvertip Sharks, Bull Sharks and Tiger Sharks. Beqa Lagoon is one of the world's very few shark sanctuaries, set up to protect the many species nearby from the harmful effects of overfishing on their food supplies. Established in 2004 the Shark Reef Marine Reserve is dedicated to the protection of Sharks. (Photo by Alexander Safonov / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
GUADALUPE ISLAND, MEXICO - DATE UNSPECIFIED: ***EXCLUSIVE*** These stunning photographs show a scuba diver swimming astonishingly close to a deadly 12 foot great white shark. Taken by top-adventure photographer Amos Nachoum, the images were shot during August of this year. Taken as part of the human interaction section of Amos' Big Animals World Class Photography expeditions, the human diver is Fernando, Amos' Mexican assistant. Regularly taking groups of up to six people diving with great white sharks, Amos has run Big Animals for almost 20 years. (Photo by Amos Nachoun / Barcroft USA / Getty Images)
GUADALUPE ISLAND, MEXICO - DATE UNSPECIFIED: ***EXCLUSIVE*** These stunning photographs show a scuba diver swimming astonishingly close to a deadly 12 foot great white shark. Taken by top-adventure photographer Amos Nachoum, the images were shot during August of this year. Taken as part of the human interaction section of Amos' Big Animals World Class Photography expeditions, the human diver is Fernando, Amos' Mexican assistant. Regularly taking groups of up to six people diving with great white sharks, Amos has run Big Animals for almost 20 years. (Photo by Amos Nachoun / Barcroft USA / Getty Images)
GUADALUPE ISLAND, MEXICO - DATE UNSPECIFIED: ***EXCLUSIVE*** These stunning photographs show a scuba diver swimming astonishingly close to a deadly 12 foot great white shark. Taken by top-adventure photographer Amos Nachoum, the images were shot during August of this year. Taken as part of the human interaction section of Amos' Big Animals World Class Photography expeditions, the human diver is Fernando, Amos' Mexican assistant. Regularly taking groups of up to six people diving with great white sharks, Amos has run Big Animals for almost 20 years. (Photo by Amos Nachoun / Barcroft USA / Getty Images)
GUADALUPE ISLAND, MEXICO - DATE UNSPECIFIED: ***EXCLUSIVE*** These stunning photographs show a scuba diver swimming astonishingly close to a deadly 12 foot great white shark. Taken by top-adventure photographer Amos Nachoum, the images were shot during August of this year. Taken as part of the human interaction section of Amos' Big Animals World Class Photography expeditions, the human diver is Fernando, Amos' Mexican assistant. Regularly taking groups of up to six people diving with great white sharks, Amos has run Big Animals for almost 20 years. (Photo by Amos Nachoun / Barcroft USA / Getty Images)
Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, close-up, found around the north western islands of Hawaii belongs to the family of the Gray Sharks Carcharhinidae and it is the only species of the Grey Shark with suction holes. Tiger Sharks are incredibly impressive and large sharks which can reach a length of more than six meters. Tiger Sharks have the broadest food spectrum of all sharks. Apart from sea turtles, seals, sea lions, other sharks, whales, and sea birds, they also eat invertebrates, garbage and carrion. Tiger Sharks are mainly found in tropical and warm to temperate seas. (Photo by: Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)
GANSBAAI, SOUTH AFRICA - OCTOBER 19: A Great White Shark is attracted by a lure on the 'Shark Lady Adventure Tour' on October 19, 2009 in Gansbaai, South Africa. The lure, usually a tuna head, is attached to a buoy and thrown into the water in front of the cage with the divers. The waters off Gansbaai are the best place in the world to see Great White Sharks, due to the abundance of prey such as seals and penguins which live and breed on Dyer Island, which lies 8km from the mainland. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, close-up, found around the north western islands of Hawaii belongs to the family of the Gray Sharks Carcharhinidae and it is the only species of the Grey Shark with suction holes. Tiger Sharks are incredibly impressive and large sharks which can reach a length of more than six meters. Tiger Sharks have the broadest food spectrum of all sharks. Apart from sea turtles, seals, sea lions, other sharks, whales, and sea birds, they also eat invertebrates, garbage and carrion. Tiger Sharks are mainly found in tropical and warm to temperate seas. (Photo by: Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)
Mogadishu, SOMALIA: A Somali man carries dead sharks to the market 05, May 2007 near Hamarweyn as Somali citizens take advantage of an uneasy lull in the fighting to resume normalcy. There are fears of retaliatory attacks from Islamist militia who some days ago were driven out of the war battered Mogadishu by government backed Ethiopian forces, by residents particulalrly following warnings from Islamist leaders of the retaliatory deadly guerilla style attacks by the fundamentalist fighters. AFP PHOTO/STRINGER (Photo credit should read STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images)
MEXICO - APRIL 01: A shark's carcass displays its deadly weaponry of teeth, Yucatan State, Mexico (Photo by David Doubilet/National Geographic/Getty Images)
Bahamas, Little Bahama Bank, Diver photographs large tiger shark.
Hawaii, Whitetip reef shark (triaenodon obesus), close-up of head area.
Caribbean, Bahamas, Caribbean Reef Shark (Carcharhinus perezi) with fish.
Caribbean, Bahamas, Little Bahama Bank, Lemon Shark (Negaprion brevirostris) close-up near surface, mouth open.
Dangerous shark
A Galapagos Shark surfacing, showing its numerous sharp teeth (Carcharhinus galapagensis). This species can reach twelve feet in length and is listed as potentially dangerous, Hawaii, USA.
great white shark,carcharodon carcharias, attacking bait,south australia
Great White Shark attacking a shark cage (Carcharodon carcharias), Guadalupe Island, Mexico.
A little girl looks around as a 2.8 meter tiger shark inside an aquarium passes by Wednesday, April 13, 2011 at Manila's Ocean Park, Philippines. (AP Photo/Pat Roque)
A Sand Tiger Shark swims in its aquarium at the Zoo-Aquarium in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2010. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
Dead small toothed sand tiger sharks lie on the ground at a fishmonger's stall in the coastal city of Tyre, southern Lebanon on December 15, 2013. Nine sharks, weighing up to 50kg each, were caught in Tyre, according to local fishermen, who believe they were brought to the coastal waters by Storm Alexa, which swept the eastern Mediterranean this week. AFP PHOTO / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 16: Michael McLean, of Mississauga, takes photos as a Sawfish and Sand Tiger sharks circle around in Dangerous Lagoon as Ripley's Aquarium of Canada opened to the public. October 16, 2013. (Bernard Weil/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
DARWIN, AUSTRALIA - AUGUST 8: (EUROPE AND AUSTRALASIA OUT) The remains of an Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin that washed up on the beach at Lee Point on August 8, 2011 in Darwin, Australia. The 1.8m dolphin was found on the beach with a chunk missing, believed to have been caused by a bite from a tiger shark. (Photo by Justin Sanson/Newspix/Getty Images)
BAHAMAS - JULY 13: *** EXCLUSIVE *** A Great hammerhead shark on March 27, 2004 in the Bahamas.Shark shepherd Jim Abernathy has spent an incredible 35 years interacting with sharks underwater and BONDED with some of the largest and most fearsome predators ion the seas. The 52-year-old, from Florida, has won the trust of many individual sharks - so much so that they follow him around like meek puppy dogs. He loves the animals so much - spending 320 days a year with them for two decades - that he has even shunned the idea of finding true love with a GIRLFRIEND or WIFE. Using his incredible relationship with sharks he has managed to capture extraordinary close up pictures of the wild predatory fish in their natural habitats in the Bahamas, Mexico and South Africa. During his career he has dived with schools of up to 20 tiger sharks - a species known as one of few man eaters - 24 basking sharks, 70 lemon sharks and a massive 350 Caribbean reef sharks. Other images show him up-close-and-personal with 15foot tiger shark Emma. His new book 'Sharks Up Close' tells the story of the larger sharks of the world and aims to educate about the importance of the animals' conservation from fishing and is available on hardback for £15.75 from Amazon or www.scuba-adventures.com (Photo by Jim Abernethy / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
TIGER BEACH, BAHAMAS - NOVEMBER 26: ***EXCLUSIVE*** Lemon shark cleaned by shark sucker fish, on November 26, 2008 in Tiger Beach, Bahamas. Shark shepherd Jim Abernathy has spent an incredible 35 years interacting with sharks underwater and BONDED with some of the largest and most fearsome predators ion the seas. The 52-year-old, from Florida, has won the trust of many individual sharks - so much so that they follow him around like meek puppy dogs. He loves the animals so much - spending 320 days a year with them for two decades - that he has even shunned the idea of finding true love with a GIRLFRIEND or WIFE. Using his incredible relationship with sharks he has managed to capture extraordinary close up pictures of the wild predatory fish in their natural habitats in the Bahamas, Mexico and South Africa. During his career he has dived with schools of up to 20 tiger sharks - a species known as one of few man eaters - 24 basking sharks, 70 lemon sharks and a massive 350 Caribbean reef sharks. Other images show him up-close-and-personal with 15foot tiger shark Emma. His new book 'Sharks Up Close' tells the story of the larger sharks of the world and aims to educate about the importance of the animals' conservation from fishing and is available on hardback for £15.75 from Amazon or www.scuba-adventures.com (Photo by Jim Abernethy / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
TIGER BEACH, THE BAHAMAS - UNDATED: Exclusive, A close up of the pores on the nose of a Lemon Shark (Negaprion Brevirostris). These incredible close ups show unprotected divers swimming with huge sharks - and some of them are man-eaters. One spectacular image shows a diver perilously close to the notorious Tiger Shark, thought to be second only to the Great White Shark in terms of attacks on humans. Another stomach-churning portrait shows a Lemon shark with bloodied rows of teeth seemingly smiling for the camera. And in a further demonstration for the apparent lack of fear held by the divers, post office worker Jose Mesas, 41, from Barcelona, casually sits on the edge of a dive boat leaving his feet dangling in the ocean as a huge Lemon shark drifts past in the water below. The stunning collection was caught on camera by Miquel Armengol, 32, an economist and manager of a water sports company from Andorra as he visited Tiger Beach in the Bahamas. (Photo by Miquel Armengol/ Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
Kuala Lumpur, MALAYSIA: A diver feeds a shark at the Aquarium in Kuala Lumpur, 12 June 2006. For the first time in Malaysia, 'Dive with Sharks' offers the experience of a lifetime for visitors to get up close and personal with Kuala Lumpur Aquaria most fascinating marine life of the deep ocean such as the Sand Tiger Sharks, Giant Blotched Fantail Ray, Moray Eels, Giant Groupers and other mesmerizing denizens of the underwater world. AFP PHOTO/TEH ENG KOON (Photo credit should read TEH ENG KOON/AFP/Getty Images)
Tiger shark. (Photo by Peter Stackpole/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
Tiger shark. (Photo by Peter Stackpole/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
Tiger shark eating lemon shark. (Photo by Peter Stackpole/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
Tiger shark devouring a lemon shark. (Photo by Peter Stackpole/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
BEQA LAGOON, FIJI: UNDATED: *** EXCLUSIVE *** A diver swims with a grey reef shark in Beqa Lagon, Fiji. It is one of the world's most shark-infested patches of water yet this lagoon off Fiji manages to draw hundreds of divers every year. For most people the possibility of coming face to face with hungry sharks in one dive would be enough to have them rooted to dry land, but there is a breed of nature lovers who get a thrill from being that close to the deadly predators. Underwater photographer Alexander Safonov while on a diving trip the Beqa Lagoon south of the Fijian island of Viti Levu in May. Harbouring eight species of sharks divers can interact with Whitetip Reef Sharks, Blacktip Reef Sharks, Grey Sharks, Tawny Nurse Sharks, Sicklefin Lemon Sharks, Silvertip Sharks, Bull Sharks and Tiger Sharks. Beqa Lagoon is one of the world's very few shark sanctuaries, set up to protect the many species nearby from the harmful effects of overfishing on their food supplies. Established in 2004 the Shark Reef Marine Reserve is dedicated to the protection of Sharks. (Photo by Alexander Safonov / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
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She is one of the biggest great white sharks ever filmed and could be at least fifty years old.

The vertical slashes on her left flank are either from fights with other sharks or mating scars.

With a hugely swollen belly, she is also heavily pregnant and likely to be hungry.

The team, consisting of scientists from Woods Hole's Oceanographic Institute in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, is able to tag Deep Blue. She leads the scientists to the Twin Canyons elephant seal colony.

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