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Ohio postal worker caught throwing mail in dumpster

Ohio Postal Worker Caught Throwing Mail In Dumpster

Some Cincinnati, Ohio, residents captured video of a U.S. postal worker dumping stacks of mail into a dumpster Wednesday -- and they quickly handed that video over to local media.



‚ÄčWCPO reports: In they go, letters, bills, paychecks for people in Bond Hill.

WCPO spoke with residents of that neighborhood who were confused about why they didn't receive any mail Thursday. After the station showed them that video, they were shocked:

Alicia Carr: "Me, my stepmom lives here -- she's missing mail, my sister, some of my friends who live here are missing mail."

Calvin Harper: "I'm a little saddened because you rely on the postal system."

Resident complaints combined with that video prompted the local post office to fish the mail out of the dumpster so it could still be delivered.

In an email to The Cincinnati Enquirer, a spokesman for the U.S. Postal Service said: "This is clearly unacceptable behavior. ... The Postal Service's Office of the Inspector General (OIG) is currently investigating this incident."

A select few postal workers haven't exactly given the agency a good image in the media the past several months.

Back in March, a New York postal worker was arrested on suspicion of throwing mail in dumpsters 15 times over several months.

Just one month later, WLEX reported a Kentucky couple's surveillance camera caught a postal worker apparently sitting in his or her vehicle while simply throwing packages onto the couple's driveway.

Although the Bond Hill residents eventually received their mail, that doesn't mean the postal worker is off the hook.

It's against the law for anyone who's voluntarily taken charge of someone else's mail not to deliver it, and failing to do so can result in a fine up to $500 and up to one year in prison.

The Cincinnati Enquirer says that USPS put the unidentified postal worker on unpaid leave, and the decision whether to prosecute her will be made by the U.S. Attorney's office.

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