Man: Wife's remains found 35 years after Jonestown

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Man: Wife's remains found 35 years after Jonestown
Color copies of Jonestown Promotional Book in 1978. (AP Photo/Ray Stubblebine)
The Guyana home of the religious cult, The Peoples Temple, is surrounded by dense jungle, Nov. 26, 1978, Jonestown, Guyana. The founder and leader of the cult, Rev. Jim Jones, led the residents of Jonestown in a mass suicide that resulted in 914 deaths. (AP Photo)
Tracy Parks, 12, of Ukiah, Calif., looks at a photographer as her father, Gerald, rests in a Georgetown, Guyana hotel, Nov. 24, 1978. Tracy, along with the rest of her family, was present when shooting broke out at the airport and saw her mother, Patricia Parks, shot to death, allegedly by one of Rev. Jim Jones followers. The shooting occurred at the same time Calif. Rep. Leo J. Ryan and three newsmen were also killed. The five surviving Parks, including Tracy's 64-year-old grandmother, then fled into the jungle, re-emerging as some of the first survivors to come back out of the jungle. (AP Photo/Ken Hawkins)
Various drugs are scattered along a table at a cult site, Nov. 26, 1978, Jonestown, Guyana. Investigators uncovered the large quantity of drugs while searching the home of the religious cult for victims of the mass suicide which 909 died. (AP Photo/Val Mazzenga)
Picture taken in 1978 of 'Temple of people' members' children in the nursery of the sect in Georgetown, renamed Jonestown, Jim Jones guru's name. Overnight 20 November 1978, bodies of more than 400 members of the sect were discovered after they committed mass suicide, compliance with the rules of the sect. (Photo by AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. soldiers remove the last of the bodies of the 914 suicide victims at Jonestown, Guyana, Nov. 26, 1978. The members of the religious cult all died in a mass suicide led by Rev. Jim Jones. (AP Photo)
A worker nails shut a window on one of the buildings at Jonestown, Guyana Monday, Nov. 28, 1978. Government officials went to Jonestown to take inventory and to shut down the settlement where a mass suicide led by Rev. Jim Jones killed 912 members of the cult. (AP Photo/Harrity)
This is the bedroom of Cult leader Rev. Jim Jones, Nov. 26, 1978, Jonestown, Guyana. Jones led the cult in mass suicide a week ago on Saturday, which resulted in 918 deaths. (AP Photo/Val Mazzenga)
U.S. military personnel place bodies in coffins at the airport in Georgetown, Guyana after 900 members of the People's Temple committed suicide in Jonestown, Guyana in Nov. 1978. The Rev. Jim Jones urged his disciples to drink cyanide-laced grape punch. Jones, who was among those who died, led the Peoples Temple, which ran a free clinic and a drug rehabilitation program and performed other charitable functions. (AP Photo/file)
Picture taken in 1978 of 'Temple of people' members' children in the nursery of the sect in Georgetown, renamed Jonestown, Jim Jones guru's name. Overnight 20 November 1978, bodies of more than 400 members of the sect were discovered after they committed mass suicide, compliance with the rules of the sect. (Photo by AFP/Getty Images)
Stack of U.S. passports that belonged to members of the Peoples Temple cult, who participated in a mass suicide, 1978, Jonestown, Guyana. (AP Photo)
Bottles of poison which belonged to members of the Peoples Temple cult, who participated in a mass suicide, 1978, in Jonestown, Guyana. (AP Photo)
Picture taken in 1978 of 'Temple of people' members' mending old clothes in Georgetown sect' house, renamed Jonestown, Jim Jones guru's name. Overnight 20 November 1978, bodies of more than 400 members of the sect were discovered after they committed mass suicide, compliance with the rules of the sect. (Photo by AFP/Getty Images)
Picture taken in 1978 of 'Temple of people' members' in front of the agricultural department of the sect, in Georgetown, renamed Jonestown, Jim Jones guru's name. Overnight 20 November 1978, bodies of more than 400 members of the sect were discovered after they committed mass suicide, compliance with the rules of the sect. (Photo by AFP/Getty Images)
Steve Jones, son of the Rev. Jim Jones, listens to speakers while attending a ceremony marking the 20th anniversary of the People's Temple mass murder-suicide in Jonestown, Guyana Wednesday, Nov. 18, 1998, at the Evergreen cemetery in Oakland, Calif. The service was held on the location of a mass gravesite, where 417 of the victims are buried. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
Jonestown survivor Deborah Layton talks to reporters at her house in Piedmont, Calif., Monday, Nov. 9, 1998. Layton is the author of "Seductive Poison," an account of events leading up to the mass suicide of more than 900 followers of Jim Jones who drank cyanide-poisoned punch in the Guyana jungle in November 1978. (AP Photo/Susan Ragan)
** ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY NOV. 16 ** Stephan Jones, son of Rev. Jim Jones of the Peoples Temple, poses for a portrait near San Rafael, Calif., Thursday, Nov. 13, 2008. Thirty years after the tragedy in Jonestown, dozens of surviving members come together for private reunions. "I go because I feel so strongly about the need for and power of forgiveness and understanding," said Stephan Jones. He was 19, and in Georgetown with other basketball team members on the temple's last day. Today, he is the father of three daughters and is the vice president of a small Bay Area office installation and services company.(AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
Death penalty opponent Sister Kay Burton of Jonestown, Miss., lights a remembrance candle in memory one of the four people killed by death row inmate Jan Michael Brawner, during a memorial ceremony on the grounds of the Mississippi State Penitentiary in Parchman, Miss., Tuesday, June 12, 2012. Brawner was executed by lethal injection Tuesday for the killings of his 3-year-old daughter, his ex-wife and her parents. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
FILE _ In this May 12, 2011 file photo, Jim Jones Jr., the adopted son of Jim Jones, left, and John Cobb, who lost ten relatives in the Jonestown tragedy, stand near a Jonestown memorial at Evergreen Cemetery in Oakland, Calif. Jones Jr. says the inclusion of his father's name among the others is about representing the truth of what happened on Nov. 18, 1978. "Our memorial removes individual opinions and makes it factual," Jones Jr. said (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, file)
From left, Rev. Eugene Lumpkin, Rev. Amos Brown, Jonestown survivor Stanley Clayton, Julana Roberts, Juana Norwood, and Dr. Jynona Norwood watch as flowers are tossed onto names of loved ones during a dedication of a memorial wall following the 30th Anniversary Jonestown memorial service at the Evergreen cemetery in Oakland, Calif., Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008. Thirty years after the mass suicide in Jonestown, Guyana, dozens of people touched by the tragedy came together for the annual memorial service and to see the first sections of a memorial wall. Over 900 people lost their lives in the Jonestown tragedy in 1978. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
Six more People’s Temple members were permitted to leave Guyana on Dec. 2, 1978. They are shown as they prepared to board an aircraft bound for New York’s JFK Airport. They are (from extreme right) Edith Parks and the Julius and Sandra Evans family. (AP Photo)
This is the home of Rev. Jim Jones, Nov. 26, 1978, Jonestown, Guyana. Outside lay scattered letters and papers from his files. Jones led a mass suicide of his religious cult that resulted in 912 deaths. (AP Photo/Val Mazzenga)
Syringes surround one of the vats used to mix up the position drink used in a mass suicide for 918 people at the religious cult town of Jonestown, Nov. 26, 1978, Guyana. (AP Photo/Pool/Val Mazzenga)
Scene at People's Temple, Jonestown, Guyana, 1978, after mass suicide by cult led by Jim Jones. (AP Photo)
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DOVER, Del. (AP) - A California man says he is glad to finally be able to claim the remains of his wife, more than 35 years after she was among more than 900 who died in a suicide-murder in Jonestown, Guyana.

The cremated remains of nine Jonestown victims recently discovered in an abandoned funeral home in Dover, Delaware, include those of 28-year-old Maud Ester Perkins.

Sixty-four-year-old Irvin Ray Perkins told The Associated Press on Friday that he had been unable to determine what happened to his wife's remains until Delaware officials contacted him a day earlier.

Perkins says he plans to put his wife's ashes on his mantle.

Hundreds of decomposing bodies were brought from Jonestown to the Dover Air Force Base military mortuary in 1978. Some remains were never claimed or identified.

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