Researchers ID 1st set of remains from Fla. school

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Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys
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Researchers ID 1st set of remains from Fla. school
From left, Steven Barnes, 61, of Smyrna, Ga., his son Jason Due-Barnes, 9, wife Tananarive Due, 47, and her father John Due, 78, of Atlanta, embrace during a memorial ceremony at the Boot Hill cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013 in Marianna, Fla. John Due's wife's uncle died at the school in 1937 after he was stabbed by another student. A team of anthropologists from the University of South Florida began exhuming suspected graves on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013 at the now closed school. Thirty one metal crosses mark a cemetery on the property, but ground penetrating radar shows 19 possible burial sites that are unmarked. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
Dick Colon, a member of the White House Boys, walks through the grave site of fellow inmates at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys, following ceremonies dedicating a memorial to the suffering of the White House Boys,Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008, in Marianna, Fla.(AP Photo/Phil Coale)
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., speaks to the media about the on-going research being done at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla., at the United States Courthouse, Tuesday, April 15, 2014, in Tampa, Fla. Researchers from the university said they have excavated the remains that were in a graveyard at Dozier. Nelson is sitting in front of a photo showing facial approximation and superimposition of what one of the victims may have looked like based on skull fragments found. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., center, along with University of South Florida Associate Professor Erin Kimmerle, left, and Hillsborough County Sheriff David Gee, right, speak to the media about the on-going research being done at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla., at the United States Courthouse, Tuesday, April 15, 2014, in Tampa, Fla. Researchers from the university said they have excavated the remains that were in a graveyard at Dozier. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
University of South Florida Associate Professor Erin Kimmerle speaks to the media about the on-going research being done at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla., at the United States Courthouse, Tuesday, April 15, 2014, in Tampa, Fla. Researchers from the university said they have excavated the remains that were in a graveyard at Dozier. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., center, along with University of South Florida Associate Professor Erin Kimmerle, left, and Hillsborough County Sheriff David Gee, right, speak to the media about the on-going research being done at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla., at the United States Courthouse, Tuesday, April 15, 2014, in Tampa, Fla. Researchers from the university said they have excavated the remains that were in a graveyard at Dozier. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
Artifacts from a coffin found in a grave at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla., are shown during news conference Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, at the University of South Florida in Tampa. Researchers from the university have excavated the remains of 55 people in a graveyard at Dozier, five more than previous fieldwork had indicated might be there and 24 more than official records indicate should be there. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
University of South Florida Associate Professor Christian Wells holds a childs marble during news conference Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, in Tampa, Fla., regarding a research project at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Researchers from the university have excavated the remains of 55 people in a graveyard at Dozier, five more than previous fieldwork had indicated might be there and 24 more than official records indicate should be there. The marble was found in one of the grave sites. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
Artifacts from a coffin found in a grave at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla., are shown during news conference Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, at the University of South Florida in Tampa. Researchers from the university have excavated the remains of 55 people in a graveyard at Dozier, five more than previous fieldwork had indicated might be there and 24 more than official records indicate should be there. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
Hillsborough County Sheriff Office Major Robert Ura gestures during news conference Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Fla., regarding a research project at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Researchers say the remains of 55 people have been excavated from a graveyard at a former reform school with a history of abuse. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
University of South Florida Associate Professor Christian Wells looks at some artifacts during a news conference Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, in Tampa, Fla., regarding a research project at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Researchers from the university have excavated the remains of 55 people in a graveyard at Dozier, five more than previous fieldwork had indicated might be there and 24 more than official records indicate should be there. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
University of South Florida Associate Professor Erin Kimmerle gestures during news conference Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, in Tampa, Fla., regarding a research project at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Researchers from the university have excavated the remains of 55 people in a graveyard at Dozier, five more than previous fieldwork had indicated might be there and 24 more than official records indicate should be there. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
Ovell Krell speaks about her deceased brother George Owen Smith during news conference Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, in Tampa, Fla., regarding a research project at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Researchers say the remains of 55 people have been excavated from a graveyard at a former reform school with a history of abuse. George Owen Smith reportedly died at Dozier in 1941. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
A Dec. 17, 2013 photo, provided by the University of South Florida, shows artifacts from a coffin found in a grave at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Researchers from the university have excavated the remains of 55 people in a graveyard at Dozier, five more than previous fieldwork had indicated might be there and 24 more than official records indicate should be there. (AP Photo/Ho, University of South Florida Anthropology Team)
A Dec. 17, 2013 photo, provided by the University of South Florida, shows Associate Professor Erin Kimmerle, center, facing camera, with investigators at a research site in a graveyard at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Researchers from the university have excavated the remains of 55 people in the graveyard at Dozier, five more than previous fieldwork had indicated might be there and 24 more than official records indicate should be there. (AP Photo/Ho, University of South Florida Anthropology Team)
Anthropologists from the University of South Florida removed the first remains from the cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla on Sept. 2, 2013. After being wheeled on a stretcher, the remains, which were removed encased in clay blocks, waited to be loaded for transportation. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
CORRECTS NAME TO LARRY BEDORE-Larry Bedore and Jason Byrd, both from the Florida Emergency Mortuary Operations Response System, load a stretcher containing remains removed from a grave at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys into a body bag on September 2, 2013. Anthropologists from the University of South Florida removed the first remains from the cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla on Sept. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
CORRECTS NAME TO LARRY BEDORE- Jason Byrd, left, and Larry Bedore,center, both with the Florida Emergency Mortuary Operations Response System, help University of South Florida assistant professor Dr. Erin Kimmerle, right, load remains exhumed from a grave at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys on September 2, 2013 in Marianna. Anthropologists from the University of South Florida removed the first remains from the cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla on Sept. 2, 2013.
Remains from a grave at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys await removal by a team of anthropologists from the University of South Florida on September 2, 2013. Due to wet conditions, the remains were left encased in clay and the entire block of clay and dirt was ultimately removed. Anthropologists from the University of South Florida removed the first remains from the cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla on Sept. 2, 2013.
University of South Florida associate professor Christian Wells uses string in an attempt to cut loose a block of dirt and clay containing skull fragments. Wet conditions meant that the team removed the remains encased in dirt so that they can be dried in a laboratory setting and then examined. from the University of South Florida removed the first remains from the cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla on Sept. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
Volunteer Brett Harding, University of South Florida associate professor Chistian Wells, and assistant professor Erin Kimmerle look at a body bag containing remains removed from an unmarked grave at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys on September 2, 2013. South Florida research Anthropologists from the University of South Florida removed the first remains from the cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla on Sept. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
Pat Brewer, Jason Byrd, and Larry Bedore, all of the Florida Emergency Mortuary Operations Response System, wheel the first remains to be removed from the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys to a van. Florida Anthropologists from the University of South Florida removed the first remains from the cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla on Sept. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
University of South Florida associate professor Christian Wells attempts to cut loose a block of dirt and clay containing skeletal remains. Wet conditions meant that the team removed the remains encased in dirt so that they can be dried in a laboratory setting and then examined. from the University of South Florida removed the first remains from the cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla on Sept. 2, 2013.
Jason Byrd, left, helps University of South Florida assistant professor Erin Kimmerle, center, and assistant professor Christian Wells, right, remove remains from the cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla on Sept. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
University of South Florida associate professor Christian Wells cleans away dirt from a coffin handle at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla., on Sept. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
Wet conditions slowed progress as anthropologists from the University of South Florida made an attempt to remove the first remains from the cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla on Sept. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
University of South Florida associate professor Christian Wells uses a trowel in attempt to cut loose a block of dirt and clay containing skull fragments. Wet conditions meant that the team removed the remains encased in dirt so that they can be dried in a laboratory setting and then examined. from the University of South Florida removed the first remains from the cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla on Sept. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
Tools used to exhume graves at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys lie scattered beside a grave on Sept. 2, 2013. Anthropologists from the University of South Florida removed the first remains from the cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
University of South Florida assistant professor Dr. Erin Kimmerle displays a pants button found in an exhumed grave at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys on Sept. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
Clockwise from top: University of South Florida students Meredith Tise, Liotta Noche-Dowdy, and Suzanna Pratt exhume a second unmarked grave on the campus of the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. on Sunday, Sept. 1, 2013. Ex-inmates from the 1950s and 1960s detailed horrific beatings at the notorious former reform school. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
University of South Florida student Paige Phillips takes notes while exhuming a second grave shaft discovered on the campus of the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. on Sunday, Sept. 1, 2013. Ex-inmates from the 1950s and 1960s detailed horrific beatings at the notorious former reform school. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
Marianna Police Chief Hayes Baggett, left, examines a nail recovered from an unmarked grave at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys with University of South Florida assistant professor of anthropology Dr. Erin Kimmerle in Marianna, Fla. on Sunday, Sept. 1, 2013. Ex-inmates from the 1950s and 1960s detailed horrific beatings at the notorious former reform school. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
University of South Florida assistant professor of anthropology Dr. Erin Kimmerle removes a clip used to hold a shroud around a body from an unmarked grave at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. on Sunday, Sept. 1, 2013. Ex-inmates from the 1950s and 1960s detailed horrific beatings at the notorious former reform school. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
Coffin nails removed from an unmarked grave are placed in bags by University of South Florida assistant professor of anthropology Dr. Erin Kimmerle at the Boot Hill cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. on Sunday, Sept. 1, 2013. Ex-inmates from the 1950s and 1960s detailed horrific beatings at the notorious former reform school. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
Christian Wells, University of South Florida associate professor of anthropology, and student Ashley Humphries exhume a grave at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. on Sunday, Sept. 1, 2013. Ex-inmates from the 1950s and 1960s detailed horrific beatings at the notorious former reform school. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
A fragment of bone is seen with a burial shroud pin in a shallow, unmarked gravesite unearthed by anthropologists from the University of South Florida at at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. on Sunday, Sept. 1, 2013. Ex-inmates from the 1950s and 1960s detailed horrific beatings at the notorious former reform school. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
Anthropologists from the University of South Florida exhume gravesites at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. on Sunday, Sept. 1, 2013. Ex-inmates from the 1950s and 1960s detailed horrific beatings at the notorious former reform school. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
University of South Florida student Ashley Maxwell works in an unmarked grave at the Boot Hill cemetery on the campus of the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. on Sunday, Sept. 1, 2013. Ex-inmates from the 1950s and 1960s detailed horrific beatings at the notorious former reform school. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
University of South Florida student Meredith Tise prepares to photograph an unmarked grave shaft before excavating it further at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. on Sunday, Sept. 1, 2013. The dark rectangular area in the center of this image is the grave shaft. Ex-inmates from the 1950s and 1960s detailed horrific beatings at the notorious former reform school. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
University of South Florida masters student Cristina Kelbaugh, left, and PhD student Ashley Maxwell, 27, dig at the Boot Hill cemetery at the closed Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013. Researchers began exhuming dozens of graves Saturday at the notorious former reform school where ex-inmates from the 1950s and 1960s detailed horrific beatings that took place in a small, white concrete block building at the facility. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
Student volunteer Liotta Noche-Dowdy makes notes as a team of anthropologists from the University of South Florida begin exhuming suspected graves on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013, at the now-closed Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. The researchers are sifting through topsoil to find remains at the former reform school in hopes of identifying the boys buried there and learning how they died. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
Signs mark skeletal remains and debris from a coffin in an unmarked grave exhumed by a team of anthropologists from the University of South Florida on Aug. 31, 2013 at the now closed Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Thirty one metal crosses mark a cemetery on the property, but ground penetrating radar shows 19 possible burial sites that are unmarked.
From left, Steven Barnes, 61, of Smyrna, Ga., his son Jason Due-Barnes, 9, wife Tananarive Due, 47, and her father John Due, 78, of Atlanta, embrace during a memorial ceremony at the Boot Hill cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013 in Marianna, Fla. John Due's wife's uncle died at the school in 1937 after he was stabbed by another student. A team of anthropologists from the University of South Florida began exhuming suspected graves on Saturday. Thirty one metal crosses mark a cemetery on the property, but ground penetrating radar shows 19 possible burial sites that are unmarked. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
A team of anthropologists from the University of South Florida begin exhuming suspected graves on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013 at the now closed Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Thirty one metal crosses mark a cemetery on the property, but ground penetrating radar shows 19 possible burial sites that are unmarked. The darker area at center is a trench from a previous excavation. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
A team of anthropologists from the University of South Florida begin exhuming suspected graves on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013 at the now closed Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Thirty one metal crosses mark a cemetery on the property, but ground penetrating radar shows 19 possible burial sites that are unmarked. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
John Due, 78, of Atlanta, leaves the Boot Hill Cemetery at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys with his daughter Tananarive Due, 47, on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013 after a short memorial ceremony. Due's wife's uncle was named Robert Stephens, and he died at the school in 1937 when he was stabbed by another student. A team of anthropologists from the University of South Florida began exhuming suspected graves at the school on Saturday. Thirty one metal crosses mark a cemetery on the property, but ground penetrating radar shows 19 possible burial sites that are unmarked. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
University of South Florida assistant professor Dr. Erin Kimmerle hugs Elmore Bryant on the site of the Boot Hill cemetery where a team of anthropologists from the University of South Florida began exhuming suspected graves on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013, at the now-closed Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. The researchers are sifting through topsoil to find remains at the former reform school in hopes of identifying the boys buried there and learning how they died. Bryant is a former Dozier School employee and a former mayor of Marianna. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
University of South Florida student volunteer Paige Phillips sifts dirt as the team of anthropologists began exhuming suspected graves on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013, at the now-closed Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. The researchers are sifting through topsoil to find remains at the former reform school in hopes of identifying the boys buried there and learning how they died. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
University of South Florida assistant professor Dr. Erin Kimmerle, center, speaks to a team of anthropologists from the University of South Florida who will begin exhuming suspected graves on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013, at the now-closed Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. The researchers are sifting through topsoil to find remains at the former reform school in hopes of identifying the boys buried there and learning how they died. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
A team of anthropologists from the University of South Florida began exhuming suspected graves on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013, at the now-closed Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. The researchers are sifting through topsoil to find remains at the former reform school in hopes of identifying the boys buried there and learning how they died. (AP Photo/The Tampa Bay Times, Edmund D. Fountain, Pool)
In this July 13, 2011 photo, former Arthur G. Dozier School for boys employees Lloyd Mills, left, and Donald Mears, right, stand outside a job center in Marianna, Fla. The closing of a reform school in this small Panhandle town is casting a sense of dread in the community. Nearly 200 workers at the Dozier School for Boys were given about a month's notice that the facility that's been a steady employer for 111 years was closing. And there isn't much work available elsewhere in Jackson County. (AP Photo/Brendan Farrington)
** FILE ** In this Oct. 21, 2008 file photo, Dick Colon, a member of the White House Boys, walks through grave sites near the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Several men who suffered through severe beatings at what's now called the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys believe the crosses mark the graves of boys who were killed at the school, victims of punishments that went too far. (AP Photo/Phil Coale, File)
Dick Colon, a former inmate at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys, walks away from the White House following ceremonies dedicating a memorial to the suffering of the White House Boys, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008, in Marianna, Fla.(AP Photo/Phil Coale)
Robert Straley, one of the White House Boys, helps plant a tree outside the white house at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys during ceremonies dedicating a memorial to the suffering of the White House Boys,Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008, in Marianna, Fla.(AP Photo/Phil Coale)
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By JARED LEONE

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) - University of South Florida forensic experts announced Thursday that for the first time they have identified the remains of a boy buried at a now-closed Florida reform school where some guards were accused of brutality.

The researchers said they used DNA and other tests to identify the remains of George Owen Smith, who was 14 when he disappeared from the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in 1940. They couldn't say how Smith died. Official records indicated 31 burials at the school, but researchers found the remains of 55 people during a four-month excavation last year.

Researchers said Smith's body was found in a hastily-buried grave wrapped only in a burial shroud. His DNA matched a sample taken from his sister.

"We may never know the full circumstances of what happened to Owen or why his case was handled the way it was," Erin Kimmerle, the lead researcher and an associate anthropology professor, said in a news release. "But we do know that he now will be buried under his own name and beside family members who longed for answers."

University officials said Owen's mother wrote the school's superintendent, Millard Davidson, in December 1940 asking about her son. She got a letter back saying no one knew where he was.

In January 1941, his family was told he was found dead after escaping from the school, the university said. The family traveled to Marianna to claim Owen's body, but they were led to an unmarked grave.

Owen's sister Ovell Krell said her mother never accepted that her son was dead and spent the last decades of her life waiting for him to return home.

A press conference was held Thursday to give further details.

Some former students from the 1950s and 1960s have accused employees and guards at the Panhandle school of physical and sexual abuse, but the Florida Department of Law Enforcement concluded after an investigation that it couldn't substantiate or dispute the claims. Many former Dozier inmates from that era call themselves "The White House Boys" after the white building where they say the worst abuse took place.

Researchers began last September excavating the graveyard at the school, which closed in 2011 for budgetary reasons. The dig finished in December.

The school opened in 1900 and housed over 500 boys at its peak in the 1960s, most of them for minor offenses such as truancy or running away from home.

In 1968, when corporal punishment was outlawed at state-run institutions, then-Gov. Claude Kirk visited and found the institution in disrepair with leaky ceilings, holes in walls, cramped sleeping quarters, no heating for the winters and buckets used as toilets.

"If one of your kids were kept in such circumstances," he said then, "you'd be up there with rifles."

All the bodies found were interred in coffins either made at the school or bought from manufacturers, university officials have said. Some were found under roads or overgrown trees, well away from the white, metal crosses marking the 31 officially recorded graves.

Officials have said that it's unclear if there are other graves elsewhere on the school site. The team excavated about five acres of the property's 1,400 acres.

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