Detroit mayor announces water bill collection plan

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...

7 PHOTOS
Detroit water
See Gallery
Detroit mayor announces water bill collection plan
Mary Ellen Kavanaugh, and her children Abby, second from left, Grace and Owen, right, of Windsor, help carry water jugs to St. Peter's Episcopal Church in Detroit, Thursday, July 24, 2014, for a water station being set up to help Detroit residents who need water. A small group of Canadians brought 1,000 liters (264 gallons) of water from Windsor, Ontario, to Detroit to protest thousands of residential service shutoffs by Detroit's water department. (AP Photo)
Rob McGuffin, of Windsor, Ontario, carries water jugs into St. Peter's Episcopal Church in Detroit, Thursday, July 24, 2014, for a water station being set up to help Detroit residents who need water. A small group of Canadians brought 1,000 liters (264 gallons) of water from Windsor, Ontario, to Detroit to protest thousands of residential service shutoffs by Detroit's water department. (AP Photo)
People stand outside Detroit City Hall, protesting thousands of residential water-service shutoffs by Detroit's water department, during a rally in Detroit, Thursday, July 24, 2014. (AP Photo)
Claire McAllister, a Canadian who helped bring 1,000 liters (264 gallons) of water from Windsor, Ontario, to Detroit to protest thousands of residential service shutoffs by Detroit's water department, carries a container of water at a rally outside Detroit City Hall in Detroit, Thursday, July 24, 2014. (AP Photo)
Nicole Hill stands at her kitchen sink where bottled water is used to wash dishes in Detroit Wednesday, June 25, 2014. Detroit Water department spokeswoman Curtrise Garner says service to 4,500 customers was cut last month, but more than half then paid up. Garner says about $90 million is owed by 90,000 active customers who are behind at least two months. United Nations experts say water shutoffs at Detroit homes due to overdue bills violate international human rights. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Nicole Hill holds up her past due water bill at her home in Detroit Wednesday, June 25, 2014. Detroit Water department spokeswoman Curtrise Garner says service to 4,500 customers was cut last month, but more than half then paid up. Garner says about $90 million is owed by 90,000 active customers who are behind at least two months. United Nations experts say water shutoffs at Detroit homes due to overdue bills violate international human rights. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

DETROIT (AP) - Detroit's mayor says the city will provide financial help for water customers in an effort to reduce mass service shutoffs that were the subject of protests and widespread criticism, including from the United Nations.

Mayor Mike Duggan made the announcement Thursday at City Hall. His office and Detroit water officials spent days redesigning how collections will be handled.

Detroit had been cutting off water to commercial and residential customers 60 days behind or owing more than $150. Several groups appealed to the U.N. for support, and three U.N. experts responded the shutoffs could constitute a violation of the human right to water.

More than 15,000 customers had service cut between March and June, although many have had it restored. Shutoffs have been halted until Aug. 25.

Read Full Story

People are Reading