Hurricane Bertha unlikely to make landfall in US

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Tropical Storm Bertha
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Hurricane Bertha unlikely to make landfall in US
NOAA satellite loop of Hurricane Bertha taken on Monday morning, August 4, 2014.
This NOAA satellite image taken Monday, Aug. 4, 2014 at 01:45 AM EDT shows an elongated stationary front extending across the entire East Coast and into the Southeastern United States. Rain and a few thunderstorms are associated with this frontal boundary. A few thunderstorms and rain showers are over the Great Lakes due to a weakening cold front. Tropical Storm Bertha is just east of the Bahamas. (AP Photo/Weather Underground)
Two women walk with the protection of an umbrella in Old San Juan, Puerto Rico, Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. Bertha pushed just south of Puerto Rico on Saturday as it unleashed heavy rains and strong winds across the region. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)
A surfer enters the water to take advantage of the high waves in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. Bertha pushed just south of Puerto Rico on Saturday as it unleashed heavy rains and strong winds across the region.(AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)
A woman looks over the seaside wall of the 16th century Spanish fort El Morro, under cloudy skies in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. Bertha pushed just south of Puerto Rico on Saturday as it unleashed heavy rains and strong winds across the region. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)
Tourists wear rain coats as they walk towards the 16th century Spanish fort El Morro, under cloudy skies in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. Bertha pushed just south of Puerto Rico on Saturday as it unleashed heavy rains and strong winds across the region. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)
Sergio DeSantiago, right, and wife, Bertha, sit on their beach chairs on Tuesday, July 15, 2014, in Manhattan Beach, Calif. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
NOAA satellite loop of newly formed Tropical Storm Bertha taken on Friday morning, August 1, 2014. Tropical storm warnings have been issued for parts of the Caribbean as the storm barrels in that direction.
Projected 5-day path of Tropical Storm Berth released by the National Hurricane center on Friday, August 1, 2014.
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BY VIVIAN TYSON

PROVIDENCIALES, Turks & Caicos Islands (AP) -- A newly formed Hurricane Bertha swirled northward across open sea Monday after brushing the Turks & Caicos Islands and Bahamas as a tropical storm, while forecasters predicted the storm wasn't likely to make landfall on the U.S. East Coast.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami said the second hurricane of the Atlantic season also was likely to miss Bermuda while beginning to curve north-northeastward.

The current forecast map predicts that the center of the storm will stay offshore as it passes wide of the U.S. East Coast, though it's hard to precisely gauge a storm's path days in advance. If Bertha moves as forecast, it could brush Canada's farthest eastern provinces as a post-tropical storm later this week.

The storm buffeted parts of the Bahamas and the Turks & Caicos with rain and gusty winds Sunday, after passing over the Dominican Republic and causing temporary evacuation of dozens of families as its downpours raised rivers out of their banks. Earlier, it dumped rain on Puerto Rico, which has been parched by unusually dry weather.

The storm strengthened to a hurricane Monday morning with maximum sustained winds of near 80 mph (130 kph) with little change expected in the next 24 hours. It was forecast to start weakening Tuesday. The hurricane was centered about 230 miles (370 kilometers) northeast of Great Abaco Island and is moving north near 17 mph (28 kph).

People in the Bahamas reported mostly sunny weather as Bertha's center moved off into the Atlantic on Sunday afternoon.

"We had some cloudiness earlier this morning. But right now it is sunshine, no breeze," said Bernard Ferguson, an employee at a resort on remote Crooked Island.

Before Bertha reached the Turks & Caicos, residents pulled boats ashore or moored them at marinas in the tourism-dependent archipelago that has little natural protection from strong storm surges. Tourism Director Ralph Higgs said hotels were "taking the threat of the storm seriously."

On the southernmost Bahamian island of Inagua, people had been advised Saturday to make preparations for protecting their properties. But many islanders instead focused on completing a popular sailing regatta before the storm ruined the fun.

"We're all partying because it's homecoming regatta. Honestly, no one's focusing on the weather," said Shakera Forbes on Inagua, one of roughly 30 inhabited islands of the sprawling Bahamas archipelago off Florida's east coast.

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